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Suppose I have N char arrays that I would like to concatenate together. Each char array is stored in an individual struct. In order to access the char array in stuct1 I need to access struct2, to access struct2 I need to access struct3, etc (imagine a single linked list with the head at structN and tail at struct1).

I want to concatenate each char array from each struct so that the char array from struct1 appears first and char array from structN appears last.

For example, suppose my char arrays associated with struct1, struct2, and struct3 have contents "A", "B", "C". I want to get the resulting char array "ABC". However, as stated above, to visit structX I must first visit structX+1. It would therefore be much more efficient to concatenate these char arrays on the left; I wouldn't have to keep going through all the structs.

Is there a way to do this efficiently in C (i.e. strcat, snprintf, etc) or do I have to manually manipulate each char array to get what I want (or go through the list, save pointers to the structs, and work my way back)?

Edit (clarity) Suppose I have a single linked, linked list. Each element has a char array. I want to concatenate the char arrays in reverse order. Is there a way to do this without going through the list twice? I know the maximum size of all char arrays at runtime but I don't know their individual sizes until I visit each element of the list (when I visit element X I know the size of the char array stored at X)

  • What's the maximum value of N? – user3386109 Jan 30 '18 at 6:30
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    Why not just write your own function to prepend one string to another? – ex nihilo Jan 30 '18 at 6:37
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    Indeed it is possible but you have to make sure that the buffer you copy to is big enough to fit those objects' contents or use realloc at each iteration what can be slow. Make some benchmarks with O(2N) (when you allocate memory only once) and the O(N) approach, then you will see what's the better choice. – K. Koovalsky Jan 30 '18 at 6:39
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    Show your structures in the question. Explain what you've tried. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '18 at 7:05
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    But you've not said or shown whether one of the other fields is the length of the string in the char array (or the length of the non-string — no null terminator — data in the array). However, for my money, you'll need to make the two passes over the list, but that's a trivial cost compared to the copying you seem likely to need to do. If you don't record the lengths of the arrays in the structure, you've added a lot of cost to the operation. You must have known how long they are as you created them; don't throw valuable information away. Don't forget you can realloc() to shrink an array. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '18 at 7:10
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Here is code which prints a linked list in reverse, you should be able to modify it for your concat problem, by passing in a char buffer parameter.

void ReversePrint(Node *head)
{
  if (head == NULL)
      return;
  else if (head->next == NULL) {
      printf("%d\n", head->data);
  } else {
      ReversePrint(head->next);
      printf("%d\n", head->data);
  }
}

The trick is to make the recursive call BEFORE you do the actual work, so that you begin processing with the last node and then process everything else as you unroll. Then you can avoid the left-handed concatenation issue, you simply concatenate at the end as you normally would like to do.

| improve this answer | |
  • This requires space that is linear in number of elements of the linked list. Which is generally not acceptable. – Ajay Brahmakshatriya Jan 30 '18 at 7:01
  • Space as in, for the call stack, or for the storage buffer? – Stephen Docy Jan 30 '18 at 7:03
  • Space on the call stack. – Ajay Brahmakshatriya Jan 30 '18 at 7:33
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I've made a simple bench to check which approach is more efficient:

  • using realloc on each iteration
  • iterate two times over the list, first time to get the size, second one to copy the strings

Element of the list which I used in this bench is a structure:

struct elem
{
    char *str;
    size_t size;
};

This is an element of a doubly linked list (I used this this implementation of the list).

Then I generated some strings in such a way:

for(int j = 0; j < i; j ++)
{
    char * str = malloc(SINGLE_STRING_LEN + 1);
    memset(str, gimme_next_char(), SINGLE_STRING_LEN);
    str[SINGLE_STRING_LEN] = '\0';

    struct elem e;
    e.str = str;
    e.size = SINGLE_STRING_LEN;

    dl_list_insert_at_tail(&l, (void *) &e);
}

SINGLE_STRING_LEN has value 10 and gimme_next_char returns chars from A to Z cyclically. i is a value from an outer loop which allows to control how many items are inserted to the list. I tested the operation for 100, 200, ... , 900 elements.

The first approach looks like that:

char *concat_str = NULL;
size_t concat_str_len = 1; // Remember about '\0' character
for_each_in_dl_list(struct elem, e, l)
{
    size_t new_len = concat_str_len + e->size;
    concat_str = realloc(concat_str, new_len);
    strcpy(&concat_str[concat_str_len - 1], e->str);
    concat_str_len = new_len;
}

(I assumed that sizeof(char) == 1).
As you can see on each iteration realloc is used to resize the string. Then the string from the list is appended to the resulting string using strcpy. Basically you get there O(N * (M + realloc complexity)) where M is strcpy function complexity.

The second approach:

size_t concat_str_len = 1;
for_each_in_dl_list(struct elem, e, l)
    concat_str_len += e->size;

char *concat_str = malloc(concat_str_len);
concat_str_len = 1;
for_each_in_dl_list(struct elem, e, l)
{
    size_t new_len = concat_str_len + e->size;
    strcpy(&concat_str[concat_str_len - 1], e->str);
    concat_str_len = new_len;
}

Here we firstly get the size of the whole final string and then we iterate through the list to append each of the strings from the list. You get there O(N + N * M + malloc complexity).

The dynamically allocated data must be freed but I don't want to paste this code here as it's useless in this topic.

I've invoked the first program and the second program ~20 times to compute an average of the execution time:

Elems on the list    |  105  |  305  |  505  |  705  |  905
First approach [us]  |   9   |  25   |  42   |  54   |   67
Second approach [us] |   6   |  14   |  25   |  31   |   39

The second approach is quite faster. I could also see that the standard deviation for the first approach is much bigger (about 6 times bigger for 905 elements on the list). This is probably a cause of multiple calls to realloc function as the first approach is more system dependent.

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0

I would consider following code if you don't mind doing some pointer ugliness.

struct Ptr {
    char *alloc_;
    char *start_;
};
struct Ptr concat(Node *head) {
    Ptr ptr;
    ptr.alloc_ = malloc(maxSizeOfCharArray);
    ptr.start_ = ptr.alloc_ + maxSizeOfCharArray - 2;
    *(ptr.start_ + 1) = 0;
    while (head != NULL){
        ptr.start_ -= strlen(head->str)
        memcpy(ptr.start_, head->str, strlen(head->str));
        head = head->next;
    }
    return ptr;
}

After all of this you are responsible for freeing the alloc_ memory. Don't know if it will be faster than naive solution.

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