1

The method a defined in both A and in A::B.

C is derived from A and uses A::B.

Question 1: Why A::B->a override A->a?

$ perl x.pl 
b

Question 2: Why A::B->a wouldn't override C->a, if we add sub a {'c'} into C?

A.pm: base class

package A;
use Moose;
sub a {
    return 'a';
}
no Moose;
1;

A/B.pm: a role

package A::B;
use Moose::Role;
sub a {
    return 'b';
}
1;

C.pm: a class derived from A with the role A::B

package C;
use Moose;
extends "A";
with "A::B";
no Moose;
1;

bin.pl

use v5.10;
use strict;
use warnings;
use C;
my $c = C->new();
say $c->a;
6
package C;
use Moose;
extends 'A';

makes package C a subclass of A. Behind the scenes, it adds A to @C::ISA. When an object of type C calls a method and the method name is not found in namespace C, perl will inspect the namespaces in @C::ISA to look for a way to resolve the method name.

package C;
use Moose;
with 'A::B';

does something different. It does not make C a subclass of A::B. It copies entries from the A::B namespace into the C namespace.

So when you call $c->a, Perl finds a subroutine &C::a because it was copied from &A::B::a, and that's what it uses. It does not need to walk through @C::ISA to search for another subroutine named a.


If you also define a sub a { ... } in package C, then use Moose ... with 'A::B' will not overwrite it.

  • thank you @mob. Your description is more precisely then metacpan.org/pod/distribution/Moose/lib/Moose/Manual/Roles.pod – palik Jan 30 '18 at 15:50
  • 1
    @palik That’s because — for whatever the reason, I have no idea — that the Moose documentation deliberately hide the actual mechanics of what really happens in Perl proper with imprecise language of their own devising, presenting it as being somehow "real". I have always found it much easier to understand when you strip away those notional constructs and address actual namespace resolution and contents. Under that principle, you should think of the Moose with() function as being an "optional" import from another package, but where you aren't allowed to say what you're importing. Sneaky. – tchrist Apr 8 '18 at 13:58

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