35

I am used to creating a .Net Framework console application and exposing a Add(int x, int y) function via a WCF service from scratch with Class Library (.Net Framework). I then use the console application to proxy call this function within the server.

However if I use Console App (.Net Core) and a Class Library (.Net Core) the System.ServiceModel is not available. I have done some Googling but I haven't figured out what "replaces" WCF in this instance.

How do I expose a Add(int x, int y) function within a class library to a console application all within .Net Core? I see System.ServiceModel.Web, and since this is trying to be cross platform do I have to create a RESTful service?

  • do I have to create a RESTful service? - AFAIK yes (or use some 3rd-Party solution I would not know any for .NET Core) – ChrFin Jan 30 '18 at 13:43
  • 2
    WCF won't likely be ported to .NET Core, because most of the code-base depends on Windows internal libraries. Can you use ASP.NET Core? There you'll have a HTTP server that's readily cross-platform – Camilo Terevinto Jan 30 '18 at 13:45
  • 1
    WCF client-side is already supported (I don't know how much), server-side is a hotly debated and votred feature request. – Henk Holterman Mar 31 '18 at 21:48
  • It appears Visual Studio 2017 15.5 and later support generating .NET Core client proxy classes . There is also a list of supported features. – jamiebarrow May 2 '18 at 9:21
  • There is a port for .NET Core: github.com/dotnet/wcf – Flupp Sep 7 '18 at 6:59
17

WCF is not supported in .NET Core since it's a Windows specific technology while .NET Core is supposed to be cross-platform. If you are implementing inter-process communication consider trying this project out. It allows creating services in WCF style:

Step 1 - Create service contract

public interface IComputingService
{
    float AddFloat(float x, float y);
}

Step 2: Implement the service

class ComputingService : IComputingService
{
    public float AddFloat(float x, float y)
    {
        return x + y;
    }
}

Step 3 - Host the service in Console application

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // configure DI
        IServiceCollection services = ConfigureServices(new ServiceCollection());

        // build and run service host
        new IpcServiceHostBuilder(services.BuildServiceProvider())
            .AddNamedPipeEndpoint<IComputingService>(name: "endpoint1", pipeName: "pipeName")
            .AddTcpEndpoint<IComputingService>(name: "endpoint2", ipEndpoint: IPAddress.Loopback, port: 45684)
            .Build()
            .Run();
    }

    private static IServiceCollection ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        return services
            .AddIpc()
            .AddNamedPipe(options =>
            {
                options.ThreadCount = 2;
            })
            .AddService<IComputingService, ComputingService>();
    }
}

Step 4 - Invoke the service from client process

IpcServiceClient<IComputingService> client = new IpcServiceClientBuilder<IComputingService>()
    .UseNamedPipe("pipeName") // or .UseTcp(IPAddress.Loopback, 45684) to invoke using TCP
    .Build();

float result = await client.InvokeAsync(x => x.AddFloat(1.23f, 4.56f));
  • 2
    Nice! Might be worth updating to take advantage of the .Net core system.io.pipelines blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dotnet/2018/07/09/… – Sigex Jul 16 '18 at 15:51
  • Sorry am i missing something important here? Isn't pipes supposed to be only for same host communications? – user1034912 Nov 1 '18 at 0:20
  • Yes, what you're missing is that this briefly demonstrates that IpcServiceFramework, like WCF, allows you to switch kind-of-seamlessly between different messaging technologies. – Chris F Carroll Apr 2 at 13:13
20

You can use gRPC for hosting web services inside .NET core application.

enter image description here

Introduction

  1. gRPC is a high performance, open source RPC framework initially developed by Google.
  2. The framework is based on a client-server model of remote procedure calls. A client application can directly call methods on a server application as if it was a local object.

Example

Server Code

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        RunAsync().Wait();
    }

    private static async Task RunAsync()
    {
        var server = new Grpc.Core.Server
        {
            Ports = { { "127.0.0.1", 5000, ServerCredentials.Insecure } },
            Services =
            {
                ServerServiceDefinition.CreateBuilder()
                    .AddMethod(Descriptors.Method, async (requestStream, responseStream, context) =>
                    {
                        await requestStream.ForEachAsync(async additionRequest =>
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine($"Recieved addition request, number1 = {additionRequest.X} --- number2 = {additionRequest.Y}");
                            await responseStream.WriteAsync(new AdditionResponse {Output = additionRequest.X + additionRequest.Y});
                        });
                    })
                    .Build()
            }
        };

        server.Start();

        Console.WriteLine($"Server started under [127.0.0.1:5000]. Press Enter to stop it...");
        Console.ReadLine();

        await server.ShutdownAsync();
    }
}

Client Code

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        RunAsync().Wait();
    }

    private static async Task RunAsync()
    {
        var channel = new Channel("127.0.0.1", 5000, ChannelCredentials.Insecure);
        var invoker = new DefaultCallInvoker(channel);
        using (var call = invoker.AsyncDuplexStreamingCall(Descriptors.Method, null, new CallOptions{}))
        {
            var responseCompleted = call.ResponseStream
                .ForEachAsync(async response => 
                {
                    Console.WriteLine($"Output: {response.Output}");
                });

            await call.RequestStream.WriteAsync(new AdditionRequest { X = 1, Y = 2});
            Console.ReadLine();

            await call.RequestStream.CompleteAsync();
            await responseCompleted;
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Press enter to stop...");
        Console.ReadLine();

        await channel.ShutdownAsync();
    }
}

Shared Classes between Client and Server

[Schema]
public class AdditionRequest
{
    [Id(0)]
    public int X { get; set; }
    [Id(1)]
    public int Y { get; set; }
}

[Schema]
public class AdditionResponse
{
    [Id(0)]
    public int Output { get; set; }
}

Service descriptors

using Grpc.Core;
public class Descriptors
{
    public static Method<AdditionRequest, AdditionResponse> Method =
            new Method<AdditionRequest, AdditionResponse>(
                type: MethodType.DuplexStreaming,
                serviceName: "AdditonService",
                name: "AdditionMethod",
                requestMarshaller: Marshallers.Create(
                    serializer: Serializer<AdditionRequest>.ToBytes,
                    deserializer: Serializer<AdditionRequest>.FromBytes),
                responseMarshaller: Marshallers.Create(
                    serializer: Serializer<AdditionResponse>.ToBytes,
                    deserializer: Serializer<AdditionResponse>.FromBytes));
}

Serializer/Deserializer

public static class Serializer<T>
{
    public static byte[] ToBytes(T obj)
    {
        var buffer = new OutputBuffer();
        var writer = new FastBinaryWriter<OutputBuffer>(buffer);
        Serialize.To(writer, obj);
        var output = new byte[buffer.Data.Count];
        Array.Copy(buffer.Data.Array, 0, output, 0, (int)buffer.Position);
        return output;
    }

    public static T FromBytes(byte[] bytes)
    {
        var buffer = new InputBuffer(bytes);
        var data = Deserialize<T>.From(new FastBinaryReader<InputBuffer>(buffer));
        return data;
    }
}

Output

Sample client output

Sample Server output

References

  1. https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dotnet/2018/12/04/announcing-net-core-3-preview-1-and-open-sourcing-windows-desktop-frameworks/
  2. https://grpc.io/docs/
  3. https://grpc.io/docs/quickstart/csharp.html
  4. https://github.com/grpc/grpc/tree/master/src/csharp

Benchmarks

  1. http://csharptest.net/787/benchmarking-wcf-compared-to-rpclibrary/index.html
  • 2
    As of March 2019, this answer is more relevant. See github.com/grpc/grpc-dotnet (and ASP.NET Core updates in .NET Core 3.0). – resnyanskiy Mar 14 at 9:20
  • I think this is the closest answer but still, sadly , it doesn't provide any behavior or throttling support. – joe Mar 26 at 6:33
  • 1
    Be also aware that as of now gRPC does not compile against the .net native tool chain in VS 2019 (16.0.2) and therefore won't work with UWP. – Samuel May 15 at 13:50
4

So from my research the best solution does not have the auto-generated proxy classes. This best solution is to create a RESTful service and to serialise the response body into model objects. Where the models are the usual model objects found in the MVC design pattern.

Thank you for your responses

1

It seems, that there will be a Core WCF project maintained by .NET Foundation with Microsoft support. More details here: https://www.dotnetfoundation.org/blog/2019/06/07/welcoming-core-wcf-to-the-net-foundation

Initially only netTcp and http transport will be implemented.

0

There is a .NET Core port available: https://github.com/dotnet/wcf It's still in preview, but they are actively developing it.

  • 12
    I believe this port is for communication from Core to WCF but not for writing WCF in Core. – hal9000 Sep 12 '18 at 17:11
  • 3
    The linked github repository clearly says: " This repo contains the client-oriented WCF libraries that enable applications built on .NET Core to communicate with WCF services. " – Bahaa Dec 4 '18 at 14:30

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