10

Following code does not compile in g++7.2.0

template <class Internal>
class Request {
    int content = 0;
public:
    friend void setContent(int i, void *voidptr) {
        Request<Internal> *ptr = (Request<int>*)voidptr;
        ptr->content = i;
    }
    int getContent() {return content;}
};

int main() {
    Request<int> req;
    setContent(4, &req);
    return req.getContent();
}

With error

test.cpp: In instantiation of ‘void setContent(int, void*)’:
test.cpp:14:23:   required from here
test.cpp:7:14: error: use of local variable with automatic storage from containing function
         ptr->content = i;
         ~~~~~^~~~~~~
test.cpp:6:28: note: ‘Request<Internal>* ptr’ declared here
         Request<Internal> *ptr = (Request<int>*)voidptr;

I don't understand what is wrong with this (apart from being stupid example). Clang 4.0.1 seems to accept it and I am pretty sure it compiled under g++ 5.4 Also: if I remove all templates, this compiles ok.

Is this bug in compiler or I violate some rule I don't know?

EDIT It seems it stopped working beginning with gcc 7.x https://godbolt.org/g/D6gqcF

10
  • I can confirm it compiles with no errors under g++ 6.3.0 also. – Erik Alapää Jan 30 '18 at 15:36
  • 2
    Aside: You probably want to cast the void * to Request<Internal> * rather than Request<int> * if you ever intend to instantiate this template with a different type – Caleth Jan 30 '18 at 15:49
  • @Caleth true, but does not change anything. This was mistake in prepared example, not actual code – MateuszL Jan 30 '18 at 15:53
  • 1
    @Caleth I think you are onto the problem, because swapping int for Internal in declaration of friend void setContent(int i, void *voidptr) makes it pass. Though that would be a rather cryptic way of spelling this. – luk32 Jan 30 '18 at 16:00
  • 1
    I've striped your example down a little and found something alone the same lines said above. In this you can see the difference: godbolt.org/g/7pe788 – bolov Jan 30 '18 at 16:05
2

I don't know whether GCC is legitimately balking at this construction, but it seems like the total lack of Request<Internal> in the type of setContent is confusing it. The only reason you can refer to Request<Internal> is the injected class name, that comes from the scope of the definition.

template <class Internal>
class Request {
    int content = 0;
public:
    friend void setContent(int i, void *voidptr); // shouldn't make a difference
    int getContent() {return content;}
};

void setContent(int i, void * voidptr)
{
    // Where does Internal come from?
    Request<Internal> *ptr = (Request<Internal>*)voidptr; 
    ptr->content = i;
}

I don't think you want a template here, because if you instantiate it with a second type you violate the one definition rule.

class RequestBase {
    int content = 0;
public:
    virtual ~RequestBase() = default;
    friend void setContent(int i, RequestBase * ptr) {
        ptr->content = i;
    }
    int getContent() {return content;}
};

If there are other members of your class, which use Internal, you can add them with a template subclass

template <class Internal>
class Request : public RequestBase {
    // members involving Internal
};

The other alternative is that you use Internal in the arguments to setContent

template <class Internal>
class Request {
    Internal content = 0;
public:
    friend void setContent(Internal i, void *voidptr){
        Request<Internal> *ptr = (Request<Internal>*)voidptr;
        ptr->content = i;
    }
    Internal getContent() {return content;}
};

or

template <class Internal>
class Request {
    int content = 0;
public:
    friend void setContent(int i, Request<Internal> *ptr) {
        ptr->content = i;
    }
    int getContent() {return content;}
};

note that you can still bind void setContent(int, Request<Internal> *) to a void (*)(int, void *) function pointer etc

4
  • 1
    quoting the OP: "I don't understand what is wrong with this (apart from being stupid example)" so I don't think the answer to the question is to find an alternate design as the core of the problem is how gcc is dealing with this particular example. – bolov Jan 30 '18 at 16:09
  • 3
    While obviously, that's a better idea to write actual code, I don't think it answers the real question, whether compiler is allowed to refuse the code or not. – luk32 Jan 30 '18 at 16:09
  • Couldn't find anything in basic.def.odr, class.friend, temp.dep, temp.friend or temp.inject to suggest that the code is ill-formed – as long as the template is instantiated at most once. But you are right to point out that this is very bad style. – Arne Vogel Jan 30 '18 at 17:52
  • Ok, so my current theory is that the code is shitty (I knew it before) and gcc since 7.x is confused by its faults. I am pretty sure that in no scope there is actually multiple setContent definitions, because if there were previous versions would not compile as well. I will have to think how to apply one of suggestions. Sadly actual code is more like friend void setContent(int i, http_parser parser) {Request<Internal> *ptr = (Request<Internal>) parser->data;... where http_parser is not templated and data is void*, so multiple changes are needed – MateuszL Jan 31 '18 at 7:24
1

This one looks genuinely tricky. Let's look at the line again:

Request<Internal> *ptr = (Request<int>*)voidptr;

Those are two different types. How do you convert between one type and another? Well, the obvious way would be a derived-to-base conversion.

Now, you may say that Request<int> is not a derived class. If we look at the whole program, that's true. But in the first phase of template compilation, the compiler hasn't seen any template specializations yet. There may still be a specialization of Request<int> that could introduce a base class later down the road (!)

I'd have to grab appropriate C++ standards to check is something subtle changed in this area, but from an engineering point is comes as no surprise when such code proves fragile in the face of minor compiler changes.

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