9

I have a (long) array a of a handful of different integers. I would now like to create a dictionary where the keys are the integers and the values are arrays of indices where in a the respective integer occurs. This

import numpy

a = numpy.array([1, 1, 5, 5, 1])
u = numpy.unique(a)
d = {val: numpy.where(a==val)[0] for val in u}

print(d)
{1: array([0, 1, 4]), 5: array([2, 3])}

works fine, but it seems rather wasteful to first call unique, followed by a couple of wheres.

np.digitize doesn't seem to be ideal either as you have to specify the bins in advance.

Any ideas of how to improve the above?

  • 1
    Do you really need the dictionary? What are you going to do with the dictionary? If it's just a handful of values, you may be better off just calling numpy.where() whenever you need it. This isn't as wasteful as it sounds – you need to iterate over the result either way. – Sven Marnach Jan 30 '18 at 19:06
  • 1
    Are your handful of ints small and nonneg? – Paul Panzer Jan 30 '18 at 19:34
  • 1
    @PaulPanzer Sure, if it helps. – Nico Schlömer Jan 30 '18 at 19:37
  • @SvenMarnach To do where, I need at least once find out which values are there, so I can't get around the unique it seems. – Nico Schlömer Jan 30 '18 at 19:38
  • Depending on what your real needs are, np.unique's return_inverse=True option may be useful to you. – Mad Physicist Feb 1 '18 at 7:04
5

Approach #1

One approach based on sorting would be -

def group_into_dict(a): 
    # Get argsort indices
    sidx = a.argsort()

    # Use argsort indices to sort input array
    sorted_a = a[sidx]

    # Get indices that define the grouping boundaries based on identical elems
    cut_idx = np.flatnonzero(np.r_[True,sorted_a[1:] != sorted_a[:-1],True])

    # Form the final dict with slicing the argsort indices for values and
    # the starts as the keys
    return {sorted_a[i]:sidx[i:j] for i,j in zip(cut_idx[:-1], cut_idx[1:])}

Sample run -

In [55]: a
Out[55]: array([1, 1, 5, 5, 1])

In [56]: group_into_dict(a)
Out[56]: {1: array([0, 1, 4]), 5: array([2, 3])}

Timings on array with 1000000 elements and varying proportion of unique numbers to compare proposed one against the original one -

# 1/100 unique numbers
In [75]: a = np.random.randint(0,10000,(1000000))

In [76]: %timeit {val: np.where(a==val)[0] for val in np.unique(a)}
1 loop, best of 3: 6.62 s per loop

In [77]: %timeit group_into_dict(a)
10 loops, best of 3: 121 ms per loop

# 1/1000 unique numbers
In [78]: a = np.random.randint(0,1000,(1000000))

In [79]: %timeit {val: np.where(a==val)[0] for val in np.unique(a)}
1 loop, best of 3: 720 ms per loop

In [80]: %timeit group_into_dict(a)
10 loops, best of 3: 92.1 ms per loop

# 1/10000 unique numbers
In [81]: a = np.random.randint(0,100,(1000000))

In [82]: %timeit {val: np.where(a==val)[0] for val in np.unique(a)}
10 loops, best of 3: 120 ms per loop

In [83]: %timeit group_into_dict(a)
10 loops, best of 3: 75 ms per loop

# 1/50000 unique numbers
In [84]: a = np.random.randint(0,20,(1000000))

In [85]: %timeit {val: np.where(a==val)[0] for val in np.unique(a)}
10 loops, best of 3: 60.8 ms per loop

In [86]: %timeit group_into_dict(a)
10 loops, best of 3: 60.3 ms per loop

So, if you are dealing with just 20 or less unique numbers, stick to the original one read on; otherwise sorting based one seems to be working well.


Approach #2

Pandas based one suited for very few unique numbers -

In [142]: a
Out[142]: array([1, 1, 5, 5, 1])

In [143]: import pandas as pd

In [144]: {u:np.flatnonzero(a==u) for u in pd.Series(a).unique()}
Out[144]: {1: array([0, 1, 4]), 5: array([2, 3])}

Timings on array with 1000000 elements with 20 unique elements -

In [146]: a = np.random.randint(0,20,(1000000))

In [147]: %timeit {u:np.flatnonzero(a==u) for u in pd.Series(a).unique()}
10 loops, best of 3: 35.6 ms per loop

# Original solution
In [148]: %timeit {val: np.where(a==val)[0] for val in np.unique(a)}
10 loops, best of 3: 58 ms per loop

and for fewer unique elements -

In [149]: a = np.random.randint(0,10,(1000000))

In [150]: %timeit {u:np.flatnonzero(a==u) for u in pd.Series(a).unique()}
10 loops, best of 3: 25.3 ms per loop

In [151]: %timeit {val: np.where(a==val)[0] for val in np.unique(a)}
10 loops, best of 3: 44.9 ms per loop

In [152]: a = np.random.randint(0,5,(1000000))

In [153]: %timeit {u:np.flatnonzero(a==u) for u in pd.Series(a).unique()}
100 loops, best of 3: 17.9 ms per loop

In [154]: %timeit {val: np.where(a==val)[0] for val in np.unique(a)}
10 loops, best of 3: 34.4 ms per loop

How does pandas help here for fewer elements?

With sorting based approach #1, for the case of 20 unique elements, getting the argsort indices was the bottleneck -

In [164]: a = np.random.randint(0,20,(1000000))

In [165]: %timeit a.argsort()
10 loops, best of 3: 51 ms per loop

Now, pandas based function gives us the unique elements be it negative numbers or anything, which we are simply comparing against the elements in the input array without the need for sorting. Let's see the improvement on that side :

In [166]: %timeit pd.Series(a).unique()
100 loops, best of 3: 3.17 ms per loop

Of course, then it needs to get np.flatnonzero indices, which still keeps it comparatively more efficient.

  • 2
    Very nice solution. This at least has a chance of being more efficient than what the OP tried, though it would be necessary to benchmark it to see whether it actually helps. And it's still O(n log n), while the problem can be trivially solved in O(n). – Sven Marnach Jan 30 '18 at 19:02
  • Note that the OPs solution is O(n·k), where n is the length of the array and k is the number of different values in the array. – Sven Marnach Jan 30 '18 at 19:07
  • @SvenMarnach Yeah that's the limiting point of the proposed one and hence the comment under it - So, if you are dealing with just 20 or less unique numbers, stick to the original one; . – Divakar Jan 30 '18 at 19:24
  • 1
    The benchmarks seem like a mission for perfplot. – Nico Schlömer Jan 30 '18 at 19:25
  • And one more thing I just noticed – it may be faster to use numpy.diff() instead of np.r_[True,sorted_a[1:] != sorted_a[:-1],True]. – Sven Marnach Jan 30 '18 at 19:25
3

If it's really just a handful of distincts it may be worthwhile using argpartition instead of argsort. The downside is that this requires a compression step:

import numpy as np

def f_pp_1(a):
    ws = np.empty(a.max()+1, int)
    rng = np.arange(a.size)
    ws[a] = rng
    unq = rng[ws[a] == rng]
    idx = np.argsort(a[unq])
    unq = unq[idx]
    ws[a[unq]] = np.arange(len(unq))
    compressed = ws[a]
    counts = np.cumsum(np.bincount(compressed))
    return dict(zip(a[unq], np.split(np.argpartition(a, counts[:-1]), counts[:-1])))

If the uniques are small we can save the sompresssion step:

def f_pp_2(a):
    bc = np.bincount(a)
    keys, = np.where(bc)
    counts = np.cumsum(bc[keys])
    return dict(zip(keys, np.split(np.argpartition(a, counts[:-1]), counts[:-1])))

data = np.random.randint(0, 10, (5,))[np.random.randint(0, 5, (10000000,))]


sol = f_pp_1(data)
for k, v in sol.items():
    assert np.all(k == data[v])

For small numbers of distincts where is competitive if we can avoid unique:

def f_OP_plus(a):
    ws = np.empty(a.max()+1, int)
    rng = np.arange(a.size)
    ws[a] = rng
    unq = rng[ws[a] == rng]
    idx = np.argsort(a[unq])
    unq = unq[idx]
    return {val: np.where(a==val)[0] for val in unq}

Here are my timings (best of 3, 10 per block) using the same test arrays as @Divakar (randint(0, nd, (ns,)) -- nd, ns = number of distincts, number of samples):

nd, ns: 5, 1000000
OP                   39.88609421 ms
OP_plus              13.04150990 ms
Divakar_1            44.14700069 ms
Divakar_2            21.64940450 ms
pp_1                 33.15216140 ms
pp_2                 22.43267260 ms
nd, ns: 10, 1000000
OP                   52.33878891 ms
OP_plus              17.14743648 ms
Divakar_1            57.76002519 ms
Divakar_2            30.70066951 ms
pp_1                 45.33982391 ms
pp_2                 34.71166079 ms
nd, ns: 20, 1000000
OP                   67.47841339 ms
OP_plus              26.41335099 ms
Divakar_1            71.37646740 ms
Divakar_2            43.09316459 ms
pp_1                 57.16468811 ms
pp_2                 45.55416510 ms
nd, ns: 50, 1000000
OP                   98.91191521 ms
OP_plus              51.15756912 ms
Divakar_1            72.72288438 ms
Divakar_2            70.31920571 ms
pp_1                 63.78925461 ms
pp_2                 53.00321991 ms
nd, ns: 100, 1000000
OP                  148.17743159 ms
OP_plus              92.62091429 ms
Divakar_1            85.02774101 ms
Divakar_2           116.78823209 ms
pp_1                 77.01576019 ms
pp_2                 66.70976470 ms

And if we don't use the first nd integers for uniques but instead draw them randomly from between 0 and 10000:

nd, ns: 5, 1000000
OP                   40.11689581 ms
OP_plus              12.99256920 ms
Divakar_1            42.13181480 ms
Divakar_2            21.55767360 ms
pp_1                 33.21835019 ms
pp_2                 23.46851982 ms
nd, ns: 10, 1000000
OP                   52.84317869 ms
OP_plus              17.96655210 ms
Divakar_1            57.74175161 ms
Divakar_2            32.31985010 ms
pp_1                 44.79893579 ms
pp_2                 33.42640731 ms
nd, ns: 20, 1000000
OP                   66.46886449 ms
OP_plus              25.78120639 ms
Divakar_1            66.58960858 ms
Divakar_2            42.47685110 ms
pp_1                 53.67698781 ms
pp_2                 44.53037870 ms
nd, ns: 50, 1000000
OP                   98.95576960 ms
OP_plus              50.79147881 ms
Divakar_1            72.44545210 ms
Divakar_2            70.91441818 ms
pp_1                 64.19071071 ms
pp_2                 53.36350428 ms
nd, ns: 100, 1000000
OP                  145.62422500 ms
OP_plus              90.82918381 ms
Divakar_1            76.92769479 ms
Divakar_2           115.24481240 ms
pp_1                 70.85122908 ms
pp_2                 58.85340699 ms
3

With ns,nd = number of samples, number of distincts, Your solution is O(ns*nd) so inefficient.

A simple O(ns) approach with defaultdict :

from collections import defaultdict
d=defaultdict(list)
for i,x in enumerate(a):d[x].append(i)

Unfortunately slow because python loops are slow, but faster than yours if nd/ns>1%.

Another O(ns) linear solution is possible if nd/ns<<1 (optimized here with numba) :

@numba.njit
def filldict_(a):
    v=a.max()+1
    cnts= np.zeros(v,np.int64)
    for x in a:
        cnts[x]+=1
    g=cnts.max()
    res=np.empty((v,g),np.int64)
    cnts[:]=0
    i=0
    for x in a:
        res[x,cnts[x]]=i
        cnts[x]+=1
        i+=1
    return res,cnts,v

def filldict(a):
    res,cnts,v=filldict_(a)
    return {x:res[x,:cnts[x]] for x in range(v) if cnts[x]>0}    

Faster on random numbers with little keys. runs :

In [51]: a=numpy.random.randint(0,100,1000000)

In [52]: %timeit d=group_into_dict(a) #Divakar
134 ms ± 17 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

In [53]: %timeit c=filldict(a)
11.2 ms ± 1.78 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

A lookup table mechanism can be added if keys are big integers, with little overload.

0

pandas solution 1: Use groupby and its indices function

df = pd.DataFrame(a)
d = df.groupby(0).indices

a = np.random.randint(0,10000,(1000000))
%%timeit
df = pd.DataFrame(a)
d = df.groupby(0).indices
42.6 ms ± 2.95 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

a = np.random.randint(0,100,(1000000))
%%timeit
df = pd.DataFrame(a)
d = df.groupby(0).indices
22.3 ms ± 5.11 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

pandas solution 2: Use groupby only (if you already know the keys or can get keys fast using other methods)

a = np.random.randint(0,100,(1000000))
%%timeit 
df = pd.DataFrame(a)
d = df.groupby(0)
206 µs ± 14 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

groupby itself is really fast but it won't give you keys. If you already know the keys, you can then just the groupby objects as your dictionary. Usage:

d.get_group(key).index  # index part is what you need!

Disadvantage: d.get_group(key) itself will cost non-trivial time.

%timeit d.get_group(10).index 
496 µs ± 56.4 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

so it depends on your application and whether you know the keys to decide whether to go with this approach.

If all your values are positive, you may use np.nonzero(np.bincount(a))[0] to get the keys at a reasonable speed. (1.57 ms ± 78.2 µs for a = np.random.randint(0,1000,(1000000)))

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.