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I'm trying to run

f = open("FurElise.mp3", "rb")
for x in f.read():
    print x

Trying to read each character in a test mp3 file. However, I noticed that using this method takes way longer than just print(f.read()). Using print(f.read()) will output the whole file in ~10 seconds, but using the method above can take several minutes. Does anyone know why this is, or if there's a faster way to loop through the file character by character?

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  • What do you actually get from printing the contents of an mp3?
    – roganjosh
    Jan 30, 2018 at 20:40
  • 1
    Part of the problem is you are writing twice as many characters; the print statement adds an implicit newline character after every x.
    – chepner
    Jan 30, 2018 at 20:40
  • 2
    @Hugh printing to stdout is very slow. To my imagination, print cannot serve some reasonable purpose here, but it's not really down to the for loop itself - more about print I would say.
    – roganjosh
    Jan 30, 2018 at 20:45
  • 4
    "so is there any way to loop through a file character by character, without it taking so long?" Yes. Loop through the characters without printing them.
    – Kevin
    Jan 30, 2018 at 20:45
  • 1
    This isn't really a programming problem. If your goal is to examine the contents of an MP3 file, just use hexdump to write the output in a suitably readable form to a text file, and use your favorite editor or pager to examine the contents at your leisure.
    – chepner
    Jan 30, 2018 at 21:00

1 Answer 1

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Python has to do a lot more with your loop, as it first needs to setup everything for it, after calling f.read() and storing it somewhere in memory. It then needs to call the print() function for each byte of your file, when the loop-less way, it calls it once. Calling a function isn't magic, python creates a stack frame for it (it allocates some memory for its variables), and then executes it. Again, the print function does stuff to print your object. It probably calls other functions to format the argument, etc... Because all this work is done for each single byte, instead of once, it of course needs way more time.

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