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I am trying to reverse engineer the Fujitsu AC remote control protocol for a home automation project. I have gotten as far as identifying which bytes correspond to which control information, however there is a checksum at the end.

I believe the checksum is calculated using three other bytes (temperature, mode and fan speed).

I have used a spreadsheet to try reverse engineering what operations have been performed to get the checksum and found that for a temperature of "00001010" and any mode/fan speed combination the following algorithm holds true;

Checksum = 392 - (Temperature + Mode + Fan Speed)

Example
392 - (10 + 64 + 128) = 190
392 - (10 + 192 + 128) = 62
392 - (10 + 32 + 128) = 222

However no other temperature (that I have tested) works this way. My current theory is that the temperature has some other operation performed on it first and that whatever this operation is results in the same value for a temperature of "00001010", but not other temperatures.

Raw data:

Temperature, Mode, Fan Speed, Checksum

00000110, 10000000, 10000000, 01110110
00001010, 10000000, 10000000, 01111110
00000010, 10000000, 10000000, 01110001

Full spreadsheet at: This link

I can't work out what operation(s) are being performed on the temperature, or in fact if I am even correct in my assumptions about what the algorithm is.

I'm wondering if there is anyone with more experience with this kind of problem that might be able to shed some light on this?

Extras:

The temperature value is the integer of the temperature say 21 degrees (00010101)

1. Reversed to get 10101000
2. Only the first four bits taken - 1010
3. Then expanded to get a value of 00001010

So 00001010 in the raw data above is a temperature of 21 degrees

Original question has been edited as I was originally approaching this incorrectly and assuming my hypothesis was correct

  • 3
    This doesn't look like a single bitwise operation. What is the context and do you have more examples? – Alexis Olson Jan 30 '18 at 22:43
  • Thanks @AlexisOlson. Please see the edit. – Anthony Myatt Jan 30 '18 at 23:12
  • The examples before the edit look like bit toggling (which is 2/3 operations). Not sure about the ones after. – meowgoesthedog Jan 30 '18 at 23:24
  • Anthony, this definitely looks like an XY problem to me. I think you'd better to provide us the original bytes and checksums before they are mangled with your hypothesis. Obviously your hypothesis are welcome alongside the raw data but not instead of the raw data. – SergGr Jan 30 '18 at 23:26
  • @meowgoesthedog. Could you please elaborate. It could be that A is correct in the pre edit examples, in which case the examples post edit can be ignored. – Anthony Myatt Jan 30 '18 at 23:30
1

I found the following solution after some more sifting through Google search results.

Thanks George Dewar on Github

1. Reverse (flip) bytes 8 - 13 (I - N in spreadsheet)
2. Sum those bytes
3. (208 - sum) % 256
4. Reverse (flip) bytes of result

E.g.

Data: 00000110, 10000000, 10000000, 00000000, 00000000, 00000000

1. Reverse:
   01100000, 00000001, 00000001, 00000000, 00000000, 00000000
         96,        1,        1,        0,        0,        0
2. Sum:
   96 + 1 + 1 + 0 + 0 + 0 = 98

3. Calculate:
   (208 - 98) % 256 = 110 (dec) or 01101110 (bin)

4. Reverse:
   01110110

Answer provided by @george-dewar on Github. So a massive thank you to him. I would never have worked that out. Mine only differs in that my remote has less options and therefore less bytes to reverse and sum, otherwise it works exactly as George has it in his example code.

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