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I need ideas to implement a (really) high performance in-memory Database/Storage Mechanism. In the range of storing 20,000+ objects, with each object updated every 5 or so seconds. I would like a FOSS solution.

What is my best option? What are your experiences?

I am working primarily in Java, but I need the datastore to have good performance so the datastore solution need not be java centric.

I also need like to be able to Query these objects and I need to be able to restore all of the objects on program startup.

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SQLite is an open-source self-contained database that supports in-memory databases (just connect to :memory:). It has bindings for many popular programming languages. It's a traditional SQL-based relational database, but you don't run a separate server – just use it as a library in your program. It's pretty quick. Whether it's quick enough, I don't know, but it may be worth an experiment.

Java driver.

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are you updating 20K objects every 5 seconds or updating one of the 20K every 5 seconds?

What kind of objects? Why is a traditional RDBMS not sufficient?

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  • Updating all 20,000 objects every 5 seconds. A traditional RDBMS does not seem to have the capability to keep up with this (I May be Wrong) – mainstringargs Jan 27 '09 at 21:32
  • These objects are proprietary.. About 20 or so fields with two 1-Many relationships. – mainstringargs Jan 27 '09 at 21:33
  • I would argue that most modern RDBMS would handle that ok depending on memory and hard disks. You would be more constrained by factors like the nature of the update (is a set based call or 20K separate calls) – keithwarren7 Jan 27 '09 at 21:40
  • I would also question - if you are ok to toss ACID principles out the window. Many in memory db techs dont provide the level of durability that you may want – keithwarren7 Jan 27 '09 at 21:42
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Check out HSQLDB and Prevayler. Prevayler is a paradigm shift from traditional RDBMS - one which I have used (the paradigm, that is, not specifically Prevayler) in a number of projects and found it to have real merit.

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Depends exactly how you need to query it, but have you looked into memcached?

http://www.danga.com/memcached/

Other options could include MySQL MEMORY Tables, the APC Cache if you're using PHP.

Some more detail about the project/requirements would be helpful.

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An in-memory storage ?

1) a simple C 'malloc' array where all your structures would be indexed.

2) berkeleyDB: http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/berkeley-db/index.html. It is fast because you build your own indexes (secondary database) and there is no SQL expression to be evaluated.

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Look at some of the products listed here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In-memory_database

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What level of durability do you need? 20,000 updates every 5 seconds will probably be difficult for most IO hardware in terms of number of transactions if you write the data back to disc for every one.

If you can afford to lose some updates, you could probably flush it to disc every 100ms with no problem with fairly cheap hardware if your database and OS support doing that.

If it's really an in-memory database that you don't want to flush to disc often, that sounds pretty trivial. I've heard that H2 is pretty good, but SQLite may work as well. A properly tuned MySQL instance could also do it (But may be more convoluted)

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Oracle TimesTen In-Memory Database. See: http://www.informationweek.com/whitepaper/Business-Intelligence/Datamarts-Data-Warehouses/oracle-timesten-in-memory-databas-wp1228511232361

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Chronicle Map is an pure Java key-value store

  • it has really high performance, sustaining 1 million writes/second from a single thread. It's a myth that a fast database couldn't be written in Java.
  • Seamlessly stores and loads any serializable Java objects, provides a simple Map interface
  • LGPLv3

Since you don't have many "tables" a full-blown SQL database could be an overkill solution, indexes & queries could be implemented with a handful of distinct key-value stores which are updated manually by vanilla Java code. Chronicle Map provides mechanisms to make such updates concurrently isolated from each other, if you need it.

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  • It's not that you can't get a fast database out of Java. It's that Java will never provide you THEE fastest database, ever. Any interpreted language loses in performance as long as you keep the playing field equal. For some workloads, Lazy Garbage Collection is actually more efficient than explicit deletion (as in DEFAULT C/C++). However, Java only wins in those scenarios if you don't use a garbage collection framework on the equivalent To-The-Metal solution. There's a reason IBM's AIX database is still king in the financial transaction world, and it's not written in Java. – patrickjp93 Oct 16 '17 at 2:57

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