-1

I have a timer in my WFP, which I want to start and stop with a checkbox.

Currently if I use this:

    private void checkconnect_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {


        if (checkconnect.Checked.Equals(true))
        {
            Timer rsTimer = new Timer();
            var timeToWait = 1000;
            rsTimer.Interval = timeToWait;
            rsTimer.Start();
        }
        if (checkconnect.Checked.Equals(false))
        {
            rsTimer.Stop();
            rsTimer.Dispose();
        }

        if (rsTimer.Enabled == true)
        {
            Shorestatuslbl.Text = "Checking";
            buoystatuslbl.Text = "Checking";
            nistatuslbl.Text = "Checking";

            rsTimer.Elapsed += OnTimedEvent;
            void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs elapsed)
            {
                try
                {
                    UpdateList("test");
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(ex);
                    throw;
                }
            }
        }
        if (rsTimer.Enabled == false)
        {
            Shorestatuslbl.Text = "Idle";
            buoystatuslbl.Text = "Idle";
            nistatuslbl.Text = "Idle";
        }
    }

When I re-check the checkbox it gives and exception saying it can't access the disposed object.

If I remove the:

      rsTimer.Dispose();

Then when I restart the timer, it then prints two tests to my listbox every second.

How can I start and stop the timer correctly so when I un-check the checkbox and re-check it again, it doesn't run it twice?

  • Only create the timer once, and just start +stop it.. dont keep making more – BugFinder Jan 31 '18 at 13:23
2

It seems as you've created 2 rsTimer objects. One in the Designer mode and the other you creating a new one in the code. Use only the one in the designer and it will avoid confusion for you. Setting time interval and events you can manage in the Properties of the timer component.

You can probably do it a bit cleaner:

    public ImAConstructor()
    {
        rsTimer.Elapsed += OnTimedEvent;
    }

    public void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs elapsed)
    {
        try
        {
            UpdateList("test");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex);
            throw;
        }
    }

    private void checkconnect_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (checkconnect.Checked)
            rsTimer.Start();
        else
            rsTimer.Stop();

        if (rsTimer.Enabled)
        {
            Shorestatuslbl.Text = "Checking";
            buoystatuslbl.Text = "Checking";
            nistatuslbl.Text = "Checking";
        }
        else
        {
            Shorestatuslbl.Text = "Idle";
            buoystatuslbl.Text = "Idle";
            nistatuslbl.Text = "Idle";
        }
    }
  • Perfect, i have been looking for an answer to this for weeks. This does exactly what i wanted. Thanks so much. – James Morrish Jan 31 '18 at 13:56
3

You have local variable Timer rsTimer = new Timer(); inside your checkconnect_CheckedChanged-method. rsTimer variable is disposed immediately when method scope ends.

Move rsTimer to class-level, and then it is accessible in different event handler rounds. Also you have to ensure that event binding rsTimer.Elapsed += OnTimedEvent; is done only once in your application. Once event is hooked, then it is not needed to bind anymore.

  • 1
    This is technically correct, however it's worth noting that had there been a hook in the CheckChanged method to the Elapsed event, it would not be disposed immediately. – oppassum Jan 31 '18 at 13:29
  • ok so i move it to here: public partial class Form1 : Form { Timer rsTimer = new Timer(); and it still runs twice when i recheck the box – James Morrish Jan 31 '18 at 13:32
  • 1
    You have to ensure that event binding "rsTimer.Elapsed += OnTimedEvent;" is done only once in your application. Once event is hooked, then it is not needed to bind anymore. Only calling Start/Stop should be enough after event binding. – Risto M Jan 31 '18 at 13:40

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