112

I have a general question with a specific example: I'd like to use Kotlin coroutine magic instead of callback hell in Android when taking a picture.

manager.openCamera(cameraId, object : CameraDevice.StateCallback() {
    override fun onOpened(openedCameraDevice: CameraDevice) {
        println("Camera onOpened")
        // even more callbacks with openedCameraDevice.createCaptureRequest()....
    }

    override fun onDisconnected(cameraDevice: CameraDevice) {
        println("Camera onDisconnected")
        cameraDevice.close()
    }
    ...

How would I convert that to something less ugly? Is it possible to take an average callback with three or so functions, and turn it into a promise-chain by designating the primary flow as the promise-result path? And if so, should/do I use coroutines to make it async?

I'd love something with async and .await that would result in

manager.open(cameraId).await().createCaptureRequest()

I'm trying to do it through something like the following, but I don't think I'm using CompletableDeferred right!

suspend fun CameraManager.open(cameraId:String): CameraDevice {
    val response = CompletableDeferred<CameraDevice>()
    this.openCamera(cameraId, object : CameraDevice.StateCallback() {
        override fun onOpened(cameraDevice: CameraDevice) {
            println("camera onOpened $cameraDevice")
            response.complete(cameraDevice)
        }

        override fun onDisconnected(cameraDevice: CameraDevice) {
            response.completeExceptionally(Exception("Camera onDisconnected $cameraDevice"))
            cameraDevice.close()
        }

        override fun onError(cameraDevice: CameraDevice, error: Int) {
            response.completeExceptionally(Exception("Camera onError $cameraDevice $error"))
            cameraDevice.close()
        }
    }, Handler())
    return response.await()
}
1
  • 1
    Chaining callbacks works if there ale multiple callbacks in sequence, each providing a result or error. <s>Here are two callbacks in parallel, how do you imagine chaining two callbacks at once? Which one does your sample pick?</s> Oh, primary flow. But you still need to close it onDisconnected, how do you chain it? Commented Feb 1, 2018 at 0:05

3 Answers 3

284

In this particular case you can use a general approach to convert a callback-based API to a suspending function via suspendCoroutine function:

suspend fun CameraManager.openCamera(cameraId: String): CameraDevice? =
    suspendCoroutine { cont ->
        val callback = object : CameraDevice.StateCallback() {
            override fun onOpened(camera: CameraDevice) {
                cont.resume(camera)
            }

            override fun onDisconnected(camera: CameraDevice) {
                cont.resume(null)
            }

            override fun onError(camera: CameraDevice, error: Int) {
                // assuming that we don't care about the error in this example
                cont.resume(null) 
            }
        }
        openCamera(cameraId, callback, null)
    }

Now, in your application code you can just do manager.openCamera(cameraId) and get a reference to CameraDevice if it was opened successfully or null if it was not.

11
  • 9
    how do you handle coroutine cancellation in this case?
    – Bolein95
    Commented Jun 18, 2018 at 20:20
  • 4
    @Bolein95: by using suspendCancellableCoroutine instead.
    – Gábor
    Commented Jun 28, 2019 at 23:38
  • 2
    You can choose to represent your error with exception and do cont.resumeWithException(CameraException(error)) or represent your error with a special result type and do cont.resume(CameraErrorResult(error)). Commented Feb 28, 2020 at 10:25
  • 2
    this is just perfect! I <3 coroutines! :) Commented Apr 10, 2020 at 14:41
  • 5
    Note that this will crash if the callback fires more than once, e.g. in some cases when rotating the device Commented May 18, 2020 at 13:35
7

Use suspendCancellableCoroutine instead of suspendCoroutine with proper exception handling

suspend fun CameraManager.openCamera(cameraId: String): CameraDevice? =
    suspendCancellableCoroutine { cont ->
        val callback = object : CameraDevice.StateCallback() {
            override fun onOpened(camera: CameraDevice) {
                cont.resume(camera)
            }

            override fun onDisconnected(camera: CameraDevice) {
                cont.resume(null)
            }

            override fun onError(camera: CameraDevice, error: Int) {
                // Resume the coroutine by throwing an exception or resume with null
                cont.resumeWithException(/* Insert a custom exception */) 
            }
        }
        openCamera(cameraId, callback, null)
    }

It is preferable to always choose suspendCancellableCoroutine to handle cancellation of the coroutine scope, or to propagate cancellation from the underlying API. Source with other great examples

-2

I've used 2 solutions for this type of thing.

1: wrap the interface in an extension

CameraDevice.openCamera(cameraId: Integer, 
                onOpenedCallback: (CameraDevice) -> (), 
          onDisconnectedCallback: (CameraDevice) ->()) {

    manager.openCamera(cameraId, object : CameraDevice.StateCallback() {
        override fun onOpened(openedCameraDevice: CameraDevice) {
            onOpenedCallback(openedCameraDevice)
        }

        override fun onDisconnected(cameraDevice: CameraDevice) {
            onDisconnectedCallback(cameraDevice)
        }
   })
}

2: Make a simple container class with a more functional interface:

class StateCallbackWrapper(val onOpened: (CameraDevice) -> (), val onClosed: (CameraDevice) ->()): CameraDevice.StateCallback() {
    override fun onOpened(openedCameraDevice: CameraDevice) {
        onOpened(openedCameraDevice)
    }

    override fun onDisconnected(cameraDevice: CameraDevice) {
        onClosed(cameraDevice)
    }
}

Personally I would start with something like these, and then build whatever threading differences on top of that.

5
  • 2
    I'm not clear: what does this buy me? It calls the callbacks, so I still need to provide some sort of callback, so what it did was split out the single Callback (that holds 2 functions) into calling a method and passing in 2 distinct functions. Unless that would enable .await()?
    – Benjamin H
    Commented Jan 31, 2018 at 23:39
  • At the point of use you're passing lamdas or function references rather than having to create a whole object. Chances are the callbacks are already async. Are you just wanting to make a Class that manages the whole process?
    – GetSwifty
    Commented Jan 31, 2018 at 23:57
  • The callbacks are async, but I'm trying to worm my way out of callback-hell and into something where I can chain functions for the default-path. Like manager.open(cameraId).capture().saveFile() Which requires me to block the manager.open(cameraId) call on some value getting filled (which I think should be with CompletableDeferred?) to tie it all together.
    – Benjamin H
    Commented Feb 1, 2018 at 0:53
  • Classic example of indirection, where the problem is just moved under the guise of being fixed. We all do that from time to time. At least I do.
    – DarkNeuron
    Commented Nov 13, 2020 at 11:13
  • Looks like you missed the point here...
    – Renetik
    Commented Jul 25, 2023 at 12:59

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