3

According to the inlined documentation, ControllerBase.RedirectToAction takes both the action name and the controller name:

// Parameters:
//   actionName:
//     The name of the action.
//
//   controllerName:
//     The name of the controller.
public virtual RedirectToActionResult RedirectToAction(string actionName, string controllerName);

Now, let's assume I want to redirect to the following action:

[Route("Whatever")]
public class WhateverController : Controller
{
    [HttpGet("Overview")]
    public IActionResult Overview()
    {
        return View();
    }
}

Naturally, I wanted to use the nameof operator:

[Route("Home")]
public class HomeController : Controller
{
    [HttpGet("Something")]
    public IActionResult Something()
    {
        return RedirectToAction(
            nameof(WhateverController.Overview), // action name
            nameof(WhateverController) // controller name
        );
    }
}

But that call fails with the error InvalidOperationException: No route matches the supplied values.

I know I could hardcode the controller name to "whatever" instead of using the nameof operator, but is there a way to get the proper name from the class name?

2
7

The problem is nameof(WhateverController) returns WhateverController, not (Whatever) that you and routing system expect.
You may use nameof(WhateverController).Replace("Controller", "") to get what you want.

Edit:
If all you want is not hard-coded controller/action names, Then it's better to use something like R4MVC.

2
  • 1
    Wait, that's all? I expected the MVC framework to provide a way to do that instead of having to do it manually..
    – Métoule
    Feb 1 '18 at 8:44
  • 1
    @Métoule, it won't, but you can get what you want by using R4MVC. Feb 1 '18 at 8:50
2

nameof(WhateverController) will return "WhateverController". RedirectToAction is expecting to take your controller's name in the form of "Whatever".
Using nameof instead of hardcoding strings is definitely good (in a lot of circumstances) but it looks like that's what's throwing you off in this case.

1

I am not a fan of extension methods because it pollutes the API in this case, but if you want, it is not the worst idea.

public static class StringExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Removes the word "Controller" from the string.
    /// </summary>
    public static string RemoveController(this string value)
    {
        string result = value.Replace("Controller", "");

        return result;
    }
}

Usage

nameof(WhateverController).RemoveController();

A Better Approach

Instead of extension method, create a base controller and put the method in it.

public class ControllerBase : Controller
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Removes the word "Controller" from the string.
    /// </summary>
    protected string _(string value)
    {
        string result = value.Replace("Controller", "");

        return result;
    }
}

If I think a method name serves no purpose, I sometimes use _ but you can replace it with a name if you want such as RemoveController.

Usage

public class SomeController : ControllerBase
{
    public ActionResult Index(string value)
    {
        return RedirectToAction(nameof(WhateverController.Overview), _(nameof(WhateverController)));
    }
}

You can see from above usage how _ stays out of the way and improves readability. Again this is what I do so if you don't like it, you don't need to do this.

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