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I am trying to add 10 strings containing the word "data" in a char array and return the result. Here is my code:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <string.h>

    char* concat () {
       char src[50], dest[1];
       strcpy(src,  "data");

       int i =0;
       for (i=0; i<=10; i++) {
          strcat(dest, src);
          strcat(dest, ",");
       }
       return(dest);
    }

    int main () {
        printf("Final destination string : |%s|", concat());
        return 0;
    }

But when I return my dest char array I get a segmentation fault.

  • Note that using strcat() repeatedly leads to quadratic behaviour (once you have the underlying memory management sorted out). I was working with some colleagues on a reproduction of a customer problem, and they'd created code to generate 700,000 numbers in a big string using strcat(). The program took about 70 seconds to run, generating a string of nearly 6 MiB. I rewrote it to use memmove() instead of strcat(), and it took less than 0.1 seconds — a factor of about 700 difference. Granted, that's an extreme case, but it shows the problem. (Look up Shlemiel the Painter, too.) – Jonathan Leffler Feb 2 '18 at 6:41
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i can not return my dest char array, i have segmentation fault => because dest is array of only one char, you can't store store "data" 10 times into dest. Instead of dest[1] , take dest as char pointer and allocate memory dynamically.

you may want to do like below

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
char* concat () {
        char src[50], *dest;
        dest = malloc(100 * sizeof(char)); /* allocating 100 bytes for dest, allocate according to your requirement */
        strcpy(src,  "data");

        int i =0,j;
        for (i=0,j=0; i<=10; i++) {
                strcat(dest+j, src);//first time dest points to starting address
                strcat(dest, ",");
                j = strlen(dest);/* next time put data at dest+j location */
        }
        dest[j]= '\0';
        return dest ;
}
int main () {
        char * ret = NULL;
        printf("Final destination string : |%s|\n", ret = concat());
        free(ret); /* to avoid memory leakage */
        return 0;
}

I hope it helps.

  • sizeof(char) is by definition always 1, so it's redundant to use it at all. – Bjorn A. Feb 1 '18 at 17:24
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You have the wrong idea that strcat allocates memory when it concatenates strings. It is wrong. So by using 1-length char array in strcat you have invoked undefined behavior because it will write to memory that is out of the bound of the single element char array.

Also the dest variable having automatic storage duration - you can't use it once the scope on which it is declared ends(which is in this case when the function ends). Using a variable after it's lifetime is over is undefined behavior.

Another thing is the strcat's first parameter is null terminated char array which is not the case here, so it is also undefined behavior using the wrong parameter to the strcat.

Provided that dest can hold any concatenated string you are working on this function you can do this

char s[]="data";
char* dest = malloc(MAXLEN);
if(!dest){ perror("malloc"); exit(EXIT_FAILURE);}
for(int i = 0; i <10; i++){
   if(!i) strcpy(dest,src);
   else
     strcat(dest,src);
   strcat(dest,",");
}
return dest;

In main():

char *s;
printf("Final destination string : |%s|", (s=concat()));
free(s);
  • @achal.: Check carefully. – user2736738 Feb 1 '18 at 16:19
  • @achal.: Because it hold the memory of the allocated chunk returned by malloc in the function concat. – user2736738 Feb 1 '18 at 16:21
  • Ohh .. I didn't see it. Thanks – Achal Feb 1 '18 at 16:23

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