3

I would like to be able to reuse fragments of my select lambda expressions in my Entity Framework Core 2.0 queries.

For example:

var result = await ctx.Customers
  .Select(cust => new CustomerDto {
    CustomerId = cust.Id,
    CustomerName = cust.Name,
    CurrentValue = cust.Orders
      .Where(order => order.OrderDate >= DateTime.Now.AddDays(-30)
      .Sum(order => order.TotalValue)
    })
    .ToListAsync();

Since I might want to calculate the CurrentValue property in other queries (in practice the sub-query is more complex than this), I would ideally like to refactor the above code to something like:

var result = await ctx.Customers
  .Select(cust => new CustomerDto {
    CustomerId = cust.Id,
    CustomerName = cust.Name,
    CurrentValue = CalculateCustomerCurrentValueExpr(cust)
  })
  .ToListAsync();

I have created Linq predicates using a Linq.Expression, but I have been unable to find a way to use an Expression as an element of the select statement.

Any help would be much appreciated.

Update - Performance with .AsExpandable()/.Invoke()

For anyone interested, I ran some test code ten times which produced the following result:

Standard Inline Code: 17ms (58,609 ticks) With .AsExpandable() and inline code 16ms (58,029 ticks) With .AsExpandable() and .Invoke() 16ms (58,224 ticks)

I suspect that if more test cycles had been run, the average processing time for all three scenarios would have been the same - at least with the level of accuracy I could measure at (simple StopWatch()).

Thanks to all contributors, particularly SergeyA for the solution and Ivan Stoev for the simple explanation of .AsExpandable()

  • You should be able to get away with just using a function as opposed to creating a new instance of Linq.Expression – Dmitry Feb 1 '18 at 17:19
  • You could simply extract CalculateCustomerCurrentValueExpr as method into Custormer. If you don't want to have the method there, create an extention method. cust.CalculateCustomerCurrentValueExpr() – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 1 '18 at 17:20
  • 1
    I tried that, but the problem I had was that the Customer object did not contain its sub-properties (e.g. Orders) in the Func<> – Neilski Feb 1 '18 at 17:21
  • 1
    Hi Olivier, I think if I do that it will not calculate the value as part of the SQL query as it will not understand the method. – Neilski Feb 1 '18 at 17:24
  • 1
    Hi Olivier, the problem with using the extension method is not that it doesn't work, but one of performance. With this approach, EF pulls back an IEnumerable of all the orders and then builds the model after the SQL call. Unfortunately, in my scenario, this isn't acceptable. – Neilski Feb 1 '18 at 17:28
4

You can reuse expressions with AsExpandable extension from LinqKit liblary (http://www.albahari.com/nutshell/linqkit.aspx).

Example:

Expression<Func<Customer,long>> func = c => c.Orders
  .Where(order => order.OrderDate >= DateTime.Now.AddDays(-30)
  .Sum(order => order.TotalValue);

var result = await ctx.Customers
  .AsExpandable() // this allow to unwrap injected expression
  .Select(cust => new CustomerDto {
    CustomerId = cust.Id,
    CustomerName = cust.Name,
    CurrentValue = func.Invoke(cust) // this inject predefined expression
  })
  .ToListAsync(); 
| improve this answer | |
  • Hello SergeyA, I tried this and it works, but I had some concerns over the performance impact of a) adding .AsExpandable() and b) issuing the .Invoke() method. Do you have any experience of this? (I could/should, of course, stop be lazy and test it form myself!) – Neilski Feb 1 '18 at 17:32
  • I haven't used this method in a heavily loaded application (only about 1-5 tps in my case). And I didn't notice a decrease in performance. In my case, most of the overhead is accounted for by network latency and delays within the DBMS. – SergeyA Feb 1 '18 at 17:49
  • Thanks Sergey, I’ll run some test with both the inline code and the Expression with .Expandable() and report back. – Neilski Feb 1 '18 at 17:51
  • 4
    @Neilski Invoke is a custom method which never gets executed. Think of it as a known "placeholder". AsExpandable is to allow preprocessing the final query expression tree, find that placeholder and replace it with the actual expression (expand). Think of it as expression equivalent of string replace. The performance impact is negligible compared to EF Core query translation, execution and materialization process. – Ivan Stoev Feb 1 '18 at 19:35
  • Thank you for the clear explanation Ivan - very helpful. – Neilski Feb 1 '18 at 20:04
0

I store my expressions in a static file and reuse the expressions where I need them to ensure to include all related data. Maybe this can work for you as well

In GetStore() I reuse an expression called ClientAccess and passes that to the expression at ShopExpressions.

GetPage() uses a simple straight forward implementation.

ShopExpressions.cs:

public static IQueryable<IStore> StoreLite(IQueryable<IStore> dbSet)
{
    var result = dbSet
        .Include(str => str.VATs)
            .ThenInclude(vat => vat.VAT)
                .ThenInclude(vat => vat.Culture)
                    .ThenInclude(cult => cult.Items)
                        .ThenInclude(itm => itm.Culture)
        .Include(str => str.Options)
            .ThenInclude(opt => opt.Items)
                .ThenInclude(itm => itm.Option)
        .Include(str => str.Cultures)
            .ThenInclude(cult => cult.Items)
                .ThenInclude(itm => itm.Culture)
                    .ThenInclude(cult => cult.Items)
                        .ThenInclude(itm => itm.Culture)
        .Include(str => str.Pages)
            .ThenInclude(page => page.Sections)
                .ThenInclude(section => section.Elements);

    return result;
}

public static IQueryable<IStore> Store(IQueryable<IStore> dbSet)
{
    var result = StoreLite(dbSet)
        .Include(str => str.Categorys)
            .ThenInclude(cat => cat.Products)
                .ThenInclude(prd => prd.InfoItems)
                    .ThenInclude(itm => itm.Culture)
                        .ThenInclude(cult => cult.Items)
                            .ThenInclude(itm => itm.Culture);

    return result;
}

public static IQueryable<IPage> Page(IQueryable<IPage> dbSet)
{
    var result = dbSet
        .Include(page => page.Sections)
            .ThenInclude(sec => sec.Elements)
        .Include(page => page.CSS)
        .Include(page => page.Script)
        .Include(page => page.Meta);

    return result;
}

Controller.cs:

[HttpGet]
public async Task<IStore> GetStore(int id)
{
    IStore result = await ShopExpressions.Store(GenericExpressions.ClientAccess(this.Worker.GetRepo<Store>().DbSet))
        .SingleAsync(str => str.Id.Equals(id));

    this.Worker.ValidateClientAccess(result);

    return result;
}

[HttpGet]
public async Task<IStore> GetStoreLite(int id)
{
    IStore result = await ShopExpressions.StoreLite(GenericExpressions.ClientAccess(this.Worker.GetRepo<Store>().DbSet))
        .SingleAsync(str => str.Id.Equals(id));

    this.Worker.ValidateClientAccess(result);

    return result;
}

[HttpGet]
public async Task<IPage> GetPage(int id)
{
    IPage result = await ShopExpressions.Page(this.Worker.GetRepo<Page>().DbSet)
        .SingleAsync(page => page.Id.Equals(id));

    return result;
}
| improve this answer | |

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