I'm creating an application in Qt that allows users to drag around various "modules" in a QGraphicsView. Whenever one of these modules is selected, it emits a signal which is then picked up by a "ConfigurationWidget" which is a side-panel which should display all of the relevant parameters of the selected module:

class ConfigurationWidget : public QWidget
{
  Q_OBJECT

  public:
    ConfigurationWidget(QWidget *parent) : QWidget(parent) {}  

  public slots:
    void moduleSelected(Module* m)
    {
      if(layout())
      { 
        while (itsLayout->count()>0) 
        { 
          delete itsLayout->takeAt(0); 
        }
      }
      delete layout();

      itsLayout = new QFormLayout(this);
      itsLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Type:")),     new QLabel(m->name()));
      itsLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Instance:")), new QLabel(m->instanceID()));
      // ... Display a whole bunch of other fields that depends on the module
    }
};

The problem is that the ConfigurationWidget never actually gets cleared when a module is selected. The new fields are just drawn over the old ones. I've tried various combinations of hide() and show(), invalidate(), update(), etc. to no avail.

What's the correct way to make a widget that can change its fields like this on the fly?

  • 2
    You should be using a QStackedWidget – armonge Jan 31 '11 at 23:16

The code loop I've used before is as follows:

void clearLayout(QLayout *layout)
    QLayoutItem *item;
    while((item = layout->takeAt(0))) {
        if (item->layout()) {
            clearLayout(item->layout());
            delete item->layout();
        }
        if (item->widget()) {
            delete item->widget();
        }
        delete item;
    }
}

Hopefully that will be helpful to you!

  • 2
    I'd add if(QSpacerItem *SpacerItem = Item->spacerItem()){ delete SpacerItem; } to that as well :) – sjwarner Oct 20 '11 at 13:49
  • Further investigation also suggests that delete item is unnecessary, as Qt handles that for us (use Qlayout::count() to verify) – sjwarner Oct 20 '11 at 13:57
  • 1
    You don't need the if (item->widget()). Deleting NULL is a nop. – Timmmm Dec 9 '12 at 15:11
  • 1
    @sjwarner that causes an error: item->spacerItem() is essentially return dynamic_cast<QSpacerItem*>(item). I.e. you'd be double freeing that block of memory. Note: I know this only empirically. – chacham15 Apr 24 '14 at 7:30
  • This is the only valid code from all the answers. However, there is a more efficient way which does not require recursion. First you delete all the widget's direct children, then you delete layout items without recursion. – galinette Apr 4 '17 at 10:26

If you transfer the layout to another widget allocated on the stack, the widgets in that layout become the children of the new widget. When the temporary object goes out of scope it destroys automatically the layout and all the widgets in it.

void moduleSelected(Module* m)
{
    if(layout())
        QWidget().setLayout(layout());

    itsLayout = new QFormLayout(this);
    itsLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Type:")),     new QLabel(m->name()));
    itsLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Instance:")), new QLabel(m->instanceID()));
    // ... Display a whole bunch of other fields that depends on the module
}
  • 2
    This is insanely ugly and insanely clever simultaneously. ;) Thanks for sharing this hack. I wish there was QLayout::clear()... – leemes Jun 15 '13 at 19:07
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It looks like the best way to do this is to use a QStackedLayout, as hinted at by armonge:

void ConfigurationWidget::moduleSelectedSlot(Module* m)
{
  QStackedLayout *stackedLayout = qobject_cast<QStackedLayout*>(layout());

  QWidget *layoutWidget = new QWidget(this);
  QFormLayout *formLayout = new QFormLayout(layoutWidget);
  formLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Type:")),     new QLabel(m->name()));
  formLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Instance:")), new QLabel(m->instanceID()));
  // ... Display a whole bunch of other fields that depends on the module

  delete stackedLayout->currentWidget();
  stackedLayout->addWidget(layoutWidget);
  stackedLayout->setCurrentWidget(layoutWidget);
}

I recently run into the same problem with a QFormLayout. What worked for me (and is also in Qt's documentation: http://qt-project.org/doc/qt-5/layout.html) was the takeAt(int) method.

void clearLayout(QLayout *layout)
{
     QLayoutItem *item;
     while ((item = layout->takeAt(0)))
         delete item;
}
  • Be careful : this will not delete the widgets, only remove them from the layout, as layout items do not own widgets. So the program may end up eating all the memory if you recreate the ui a lot of times with that code. This is not a real memory leak, because the child widgets will be deleted with the parent widget, but this may have the same effect. – galinette Apr 4 '17 at 10:24

Using while((item = layout->takeAt(0)))will cause warning message "Invalid index take at 0". I use count() instead

void clearLayout(QLayout *layout) 
{
    if (layout) {
        while(layout->count() > 0){
            QLayoutItem *item = layout->takeAt(0);
            QWidget* widget = item->widget();
            if(widget)
                delete widget;
            delete item;
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    A valid layout item may return a null pointer with item->widget(), for instance with child layouts or spacers. This code will crash in these cases. – galinette Apr 4 '17 at 10:22
  • @galinette It depends, but yeah, in general case it is not wise to call delete on nulltpr. stackoverflow.com/questions/6731331/… – Dorian Apr 4 '17 at 15:01
  • 1
    Instead of using 'delete widget', I would suggest using widget->deleteLater(). In most cases, it would be hard to notice the difference, but there may be one. As documentation about QObject suggests: 'The object will be deleted when control returns to the event loop'. This is the main point. It is possible that widget sends some signal, and after sending the signal some other calls are made in that same widget instance. If you would delete widget in a 'raw way', then you would go out of scope, and in this case you can not handle anything after the signal is sent. – Vaidotas Strazdas Apr 24 '17 at 14:30

Reparent the items to NULL when you want them to disappear from a window. I had similar problems recently and reparenting solved them.

  • Welcome to Stack Overflow. This question already has a handful of answers as well as one that has been accepted. Please explain how your answer is different or better than those solutions already provided. – avojak Jul 14 '17 at 13:56

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