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There are plenty of examples of how to use WaitGroup to wait for all of a group of goroutines to finish, but what if you want to wait for any one of them to finish without using a semaphore system where some process must be waiting? For example, a producer/consumer scenario where multiple producer threads add multiple entries to a data structure while a consumer is removing them one at a time. In this scenario:

  • We can't just use the standard producer/consumer semaphore system, because production:consumption is not 1:1, and also because the data structure acts as a cache, so the producers can be "free-running" instead of blocking until a consumer is "ready" to consume their product.
  • The data structure may be emptied by the consumer, in which case, the consumer wants to wait until any one of the producers finishes (meaning that there might be new things in the data structure)

Question: Is there a standard way to do that?

I've only been able to devise two methods of doing this. Both by using channels as semaphores:

var unitary_channel chan int = make(chan int, 1)

func my_goroutine() {
   // Produce, produce, produce!!!
   unitary_channel<-0 // Try to push a value to the channel
   <-unitary_channel // Remove it, in case nobody was waiting
}

func main() {
   go my_goroutine()
   go my_goroutine()
   go my_goroutine()
   for len(stuff_to_consume) { /* Consume, consume, consume */ }
   // Ran out of stuff to consume
   <-unitary_channel
   unitary_channel<-0 // To unblock the goroutine which was exiting
   // Consume more
}

Now, this simplistic example has some glaring (but solvable issues), like the fact that main() can't exit if there wasn't at least one go_routine() still running.

The second method, instead of requiring producers to remove the value they just pushed to the channel, uses select to allow the producers to exit when the channel would block them.

var empty_channel chan int = make(chan int)

func my_goroutine() {
   // Produce, produce, produce!!!
   select {
      case empty_channel <- 0: // Push if you can
      default:  // Or don't if you can't
   }
}

func main() {
   go my_goroutine()
   go my_goroutine()
   go my_goroutine()
   for len(stuff_to_consume) { /* Consume, consume, consume */ }
   // Ran out of stuff to consume
   <-unitary_channel
   // Consume more
}

Of course, this one will also block main() forever if all of the goroutines have already terminated. So, if the answer to the first question is "No, there's no standard solution to this other than the ones you've come up with", is there a compelling reason why one of these should be used instead of the other?

  • Can you clarify what stuff_to_consume is in your samples? Is that a slice that my_goroutine appends to? – Peter Feb 2 '18 at 16:14
  • Doesn’t matter. It could be a database, a stack, a queue. The point is, either it’s got something in it for the consumer (so the consumer can pop a value from it), or its empty (where the consumer wants to stop consuming CPU cycles until a producer signals that it has added content to it). – Jemenake Feb 3 '18 at 20:52
  • It does matter. Channels behave exactly as you describe. So have producers send their results into a channel, and the consumers can be implemented in many ways; blocking, non-blocking, with a timeout, etc. – Peter Feb 4 '18 at 17:00
  • If not buffered, writing to channels would block the producers. If buffered, you have to make the buffer as big as you ever expect the back-log to be (which may be impossible to predict in many cases). – Jemenake Feb 7 '18 at 19:58
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you could use a channel with a buffer like this

// create a channel with a buffer of 1
var Items = make(chan int, 1)
var MyArray []int

func main() {
    go addItems()
    go addItems()
    go addItems()
    go sendToChannel()
    for true {
        fmt.Println(<- Items)
    }
}

// push a number to the array
func addItems() {
    for x := 0; x < 10; x++ {
        MyArray = append(MyArray, x)
    }
}

// push to Items and pop the array
func sendToChannel() {
    for true {
        for len(MyArray) > 0 {
            Items <- MyArray[0]
            MyArray = MyArray[1:]
        }
        time.Sleep(10 * time.Second)
    }
}

the for loop in main will loop for ever and print anything that gets added to the channel and the sendToChannel function will block when the array is empty,

this way a producer will never be blocked and a consumer can consume when there are one or more items available

  • 2
    Several problems with this. First, once len(Items) falls to zero, main() is, basically, going to spinlock, driving the CPU load up while it madly rechecks the length of Items (which is the whole point of blocking the consumer until the producer signals that something new is ready. In fact, you’re better off deleting the len(Items) check and letting the channel-read operation block your consumer). Second, it requires that you make a channel of a size as large as the biggest backlog you ever expect to see, which is wasteful (and/or risks blocking your producers). – Jemenake Feb 3 '18 at 20:49
  • you could append the items to an array, push them to the channel and then pop the array as shown in my edit – Pizza lord Feb 6 '18 at 9:36

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