6

We cannot determine the order of the initialization of static objects.

But is this a problem in the following example?

  • one static variable is a map (or other container)
  • from other static variable we populate that map

the code:

class Factory
{
public:
    static bool Register(name, func);

private:
    static map<string, func> s_map;
};

// in cpp file
map<string, func> Factory::s_map;

bool Factory::Register(name, func)
{
    s_map[name] = func;
}

and in another cpp file

static bool registered = Factory::Register("myType", MyTypeCreate);

When I register more types I don't depend on the order in the container. But what about the first addition to the container? Can I be sure it's initialized "enough" to take the first element?

Or it's another problem of "static initialization order fiasco"?

4

Being lazy, here's a copy from http://en.cppreference.com/:

Non-local variables

All non-local variables with static storage duration are initialized as part of program startup, before the execution of the main function begins (unless deferred, see below).

...

Dynamic initialization

After all static initialization is completed, dynamic initialization of non-local variables occurs in the following situations:

...

Deferred dynamic initialization

It is implementation-defined whether dynamic initialization happens-before the first statement of the main function (for statics) or the initial function of the thread (for thread-locals), or deferred to happen after.

If the initialization of a non-inline variable is deferred to happen after the first statement of main/thread function, it happens before the first odr-use of any variable with static/thread storage duration defined in the same translation unit as the variable to be initialized.

The important part is odr-use:

ODR-use

Informally, an object is odr-used if its value is read (unless it is a compile time constant) or written, its address is taken, or a reference is bound to it;

Since the s_map is populated through Factory::Register, I don't see a problem here.


If the map implementation is very trivial, it may even be initialized as part of the static initialization/at compile time.

But even if the initialization is deferred, it will be initialized before the use in Factory::Register, as long as both are in the same translation unit.

However, if the map is defined in one translation unit, and Factory::Register is defined in another, anything can happen.

  • so the map is always initialized first - as it's the part of static initialization (zero initialization). Then s_registered is part of dynamic initialization (it calls a method) - so it will work fine.... is that correct? – fen Feb 2 '18 at 8:29
  • @fen: You will have issue if you split Factory::s_map and Factory::Register definition in different TU. – Jarod42 Feb 2 '18 at 8:37
  • 1
    @fen it seems like the map may be initialized before the first register call, but it depends on if the compiler supports the distinction. As far as I see, it's possible to use a map implementation that has no inline constructor, how sould the compiler decide if it's trivially initialized? I find this reference hard to keep in mind and have to deal with compilers that are not even C++11 compliant, so I even try to avoid to be forced to used the singleton approach shown in my answer. – Wolf Feb 2 '18 at 8:37
  • @Wolf so the answer is that map is initialized first in "zero initialization" step, and later s_registered variables in "dynamic init step". right? – fen Feb 2 '18 at 8:41
  • 1
    @fen if you declare an object of a class with a default constructor, it will exactly look like the zero-initialization of a language-level type like int. But in fact it may involve several non-trivial calls. If the constructor is declared inline and its implementation is trivial (zero or constant initialization), the compiler will mostly understand that. – Wolf Feb 2 '18 at 8:49
4

Your scenario is not guaranteed to work as expected. The success depends on the link order.

One approach to be sure is to access the map through a (static) function that creates the object as a static variable like this:

h file:

class Factory
{
public:
    static bool Register(name, func);

private:
    static map<string, func>& TheMap();
};

cpp file:

map<string, func>& Factory::TheMap()
{
    static map<string, func> g_;
    return g_;
}

bool Factory::Register(name, func)
{
    TheMap()[name] = func;
}

The downside of this is that the order of destruction of static variables is hard to control by you as the developer. In the case of the map this is no problem. But if static variables reference each other, the "static linking fiasco" gets even worse: In my experience it's much harder to prevent/debug a crash when a program ends compared to when it starts.

  • so it works when I'm in one translation unit but might fail when the static vars are spread over several units. Sounds logical. – fen Feb 2 '18 at 8:15
  • so when you access such map through a static function then we guarantee it's created before the first use. – fen Feb 2 '18 at 8:17
  • @fen I think it works over different compilation units. Of course your registered variable would be a problem, if it wouldn't be static but with extern linkage ... – Wolf Feb 2 '18 at 8:22
  • 2
    "the order of destruction of static variables is not defined.": It is: reverse order of creation. – Jarod42 Feb 2 '18 at 8:35
  • @Jarod42 Well, I over-simplified this. The problem is that it's hard to control it when the initialization order depends on actual runtime properties. I rephrased that. – Wolf Feb 2 '18 at 8:40
-1

Statics are initialized prior to first use. You should be fine.

edit: As pointed out, doesn't apply to multiple translation units.

  • 4
    If statics were always initialized prior to first use there would never be a problem. As far as I can see the OP does have a problem – john Feb 2 '18 at 8:11
  • this only applies to statics in function bodies, not static class members. – Andreas H. Feb 2 '18 at 8:46

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