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I was doing some interview problems when I ran into an interesting one that I could not think of a solution for. The problems states:

Design a function that takes in an array of integers. The last two numbers in this array are 'a' and 'b'. The function should find if all of the numbers in the array, when summed/subtracted in some fashion, are equal to a mod b, except the last two numbers a and b.

So, for example, let us say we have an array:

array = [5, 4, 3, 3, 1, 3, 5].

I need to find out if there exists any possible "placement" of +/- in this array so that the numbers can equal 3 mod 5. The function should print True for this array because 5+4-3+3-1 = 8 = 3 mod 5.

The "obvious" and easy solution would be to try and add/subtract everything in all possible ways, but that is an egregiously time complex solution, maybe O(2n).

Is there any way better to do this?

Edit: The question requires the function to use all numbers in the array, not any. Except, of course, the last two.

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  • a + b = a mod b. "if any of the numbers in the array" doesn't sound to me like you need to use every numbers.
    – Nelfeal
    Feb 3, 2018 at 23:05
  • @Nelfeal Sorry, I mis-represented the question. We do need to use all the numbers in the array
    – John Lexus
    Feb 3, 2018 at 23:10
  • Why is it obvious that we are not required to also use the last two? Feb 3, 2018 at 23:11
  • I second @גלעדברקן, if it's now "all", it includes a and b. Otherwise, the problem should not even state that a and b are part of the array.
    – Nelfeal
    Feb 3, 2018 at 23:13
  • @Nelfeal I am paraphrasing what the question asked, and making silly errors. So sorry about it
    – John Lexus
    Feb 3, 2018 at 23:14

3 Answers 3

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If there are n numbers, then there is a simple algorithm that runs in O (b * n): For k = 2 to n, calculate the set of integers x such that the sum or difference of the first k numbers is equal to x modulo b.

For k = 2, the set contains (a_0 + a_1) modulo b and (a_0 - a_1) modulo b. For k = 3, 4, ..., n you take the numbers in the previous set, then either add or subtract the next number in the array. And finally check if a is element of the last set.

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  • I'm having some trouble understanding this... It seems to me like you are saying I should be creating a recursive function that accesses the list and adds the first and second number (5 + 4) and subtracts the second number (5 - 4), and calls itself on both of those results. So, the first call would have a value of 9 (5+4), while the second call would have a value of 1 (5 - 4), and then continue that for the rest of the list and see if it equals 3 mod 5. So, after the first call (with a value of 9), it would do 9 + 4 and 9 - 4, and after the second call, it would do 1 + 4 and 1 - 4, and so on.
    – John Lexus
    Feb 3, 2018 at 23:42
  • Is that what you mean? I am probably incorrect... because I cannot see that being O(b*n)
    – John Lexus
    Feb 3, 2018 at 23:42
  • 1
    @JohnLexus At each index of the array, all you care about is which of the 5 possible answers can be reached. At index 0, you can only reach 0 (5 mod 5 = 0). At index 1, you can reach 4 and 1 (since -4 is congruent to 1 mod 5). At index 2, you can reach 1,2,3,4. At index 3, you reach every possible value and you're done. Once you can reach every possible value, you will always be able to reach every possible value. Feb 4, 2018 at 3:57
  • This is a correct solution, I only picked the other answer because it is a really good explanation/example.
    – John Lexus
    Feb 4, 2018 at 4:03
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O(b * n). Let's take your example, [5, 4, 3, 3, 1]. Let m[i][j] represent whether a solution exists for j mod 5 up to index i:

i = 0:
5 = 0 mod 5
m[0][0] = True

i = 1: 
0 + 4 = 4 mod 5
m[1][4] = True

but we could also subtract

0 - 4 = 1 mod 5
m[1][1] = True

i = 2:

Examine the previous possibilities:

m[1][4] and m[1][1]

4 + 3 = 7 = 2 mod 5
4 - 3 = 1 = 1 mod 5
1 + 3 = 4 = 4 mod 5
1 - 3 = -2 = 3 mod 5

m[2][1] = True
m[2][2] = True
m[2][3] = True
m[2][4] = True

i = 3:

1 + 3 = 4 mod 5
1 - 3 = 3 mod 5
2 + 3 = 0 mod 5
2 - 3 = 4 mod 5
3 + 3 = 1 mod 5
3 - 3 = 0 mod 5
4 + 3 = 2 mod 5
4 - 3 = 1 mod 5

m[3][0] = True
m[3][1] = True
m[3][2] = True
m[3][3] = True
m[3][4] = True

We could actually stop there, but let's follow a different solution than the one in your example backwards:

i = 4:

m[3][2] True means we had a solution for 2 at i=3
=> 2 + 1 means m[4][3] = True

+ 1
+ 3
+ 3
- 4

(0 - 4 + 3 + 3 + 1) = 3 mod 5

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I coded a solution based on the mathematical explanation provided here. I didn't comment the solution, so if you want an explanation, I recommend you read the answer!

def kmodn(l):
    k, n = l[-2], l[-1]
    A = [0] * n
    count = -1
    domath(count, A, l[:-2], k, n)

def domath(count, A, l, k, n):
    if count == len(l):
        boolean = A[k] == 1
        print boolean
    elif count == -1:
        A[0] = 1; # because the empty set is possible
        count += 1
        domath(count, A, l, k, n)
    else:
        indices = [i for i, x in enumerate(A) if x == 1]
        b = [0] * n
        for i in indices:
            idx1 = (l[count] + i) % n
            idx2 = (i - l[count]) % n
            b[idx1], b[idx2] = 1, 1
        count += 1
        A = b
        domath(count, A, l, k, n)

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