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i read several posts about how to create a self-signed certificate, however even if the certificate is created correctly, Firefox instead of showing me a green lock, it shows a warning symbol on green lock as "Connection is not Secure", while in Chrome instead of showing a green text, it displays a red text as "Not secured" and "Certificate Invalid".

So what should i do for local development to have it as valid certificate (except to purchase one) for my linux OS ?

i tried everything written on https://serverfault.com/questions/845766/generating-a-self-signed-cert-with-openssl-that-works-in-chrome-58 but without success to get the green TRUSTED and Valid certificate under chrome 64.x

What was valid for Chrome 58 seems to be invalid for Chrome 64.x

thx

  • i tried everything written on [link]serverfault.com/questions/845766/… but without success to get the green TRUSTED and Valid certificate under chrome 64.x and everything on [link]stackoverflow.com/questions/40951939/… does not work as well. What was valid for Chrome 58 seems to be invalid for Chrome 64.x – Alain Feb 5 '18 at 9:56
  • Even trying to create a file named /etc/opt/chrome/policies/managed/EnableCommonNameFallbackFor‚ÄĆ‚ÄčLocalAnchors.json with the contents: { "EnableCommonNameFallbackForLocalAnchors": true } did not help in Chrome v64 – Alain Feb 5 '18 at 11:52
  • To troubleshoot this issue, open Developer Tools, go to Security tab, and you will see what the problem is. It is likely to be a lack of subjectAltName extension in the certificate, which you can fix with this solution: stackoverflow.com/a/56530824/2873507 – Vic Seedoubleyew Jun 10 '19 at 17:24