47

I'm very new to assembly, and have some very basic questions.

What is the difference between these four commands?

mov ebx, eax
mov [ebx], eax
mov ebx, [eax]
mov [ebx], [eax]

They say that the brackets mean "get the value of the address". But what, then, does that very first line really do? Does it not move the value of eax into ebx? If it does, then what are the point of the brackets?

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  • 7
    The point of the brackets is to access memory. You can think of it as the * operator in C. Also, the last one is invalid.
    – Jester
    Feb 4, 2018 at 13:15
  • But doesn't the first example access memory without the brackets?
    – ineedahero
    Feb 4, 2018 at 13:17
  • 3
    @ineedahero: The last line is invalid because there is no way to copy from memory to memory. In [ebx],[eax], ebx and eax contain addresses, i.e. both are referencing memory. and you can't copy from memory to memory directly: the processor doesn't have instructions for that. Feb 4, 2018 at 14:00
  • 4
    @RudyVelthuis: not quite true: the instruction set doesn't give a way to encode any instructions with two explicit memory operands. But movs, push [mem] and pop [mem] all copy memory to memory, with one or both operands being implicit. x86 instructions have at most one modrm + optional displacement explicit addressing mode. That's why mov doesn't work but other instructions do. Feb 4, 2018 at 14:18
  • 1
    What brackets mean in MASM: stackoverflow.com/questions/25129743/…
    – Ross Ridge
    Feb 4, 2018 at 18:28

2 Answers 2

102

Let's make a very simple example and imagine we have a CPU with only two registers, EAX and EBX.

mov ebx, eax

Simply copies the value in eax to the ebx register

 | EAX : 01234567 |   ---->   | EAX : 01234567 |
 | EBX : 00000000 |   ====>   | EBX : 01234567 |

Now let's add some memory space

ADDRESS           VALUE
00000000          6A43210D
00000004          51C9A847
00000008          169B87F1
0000000C          C981A517
00000010          9A16D875
00000014          54C9815F

mov [ebx], eax

Moves the value in eax to the memory address contained in ebx.

 | EAX : 01234567 |   --no-->   | EAX : 01234567 |
 | EBX : 00000008 | --change--> | EBX : 00000008 |

ADDRESS           VALUE
00000000          6A43210D   ->   6A43210D 
00000004          51C9A847   ->   51C9A847 
00000008          169B87F1 =====> 01234567 
0000000C          C981A517   ->   C981A517 
00000010          9A16D875   ->   9A16D875 
00000014          54C9815F   ->   54C9815F 

mov ebx, [eax]

Moves the value from the memory address contained in eax to ebx.

 | EAX : 00000008 |    ->     | EAX : 00000008 |
 | EBX : 01234567 |   ====>   | EBX : 169B87F1 |

[No change to memory]
ADDRESS           VALUE
00000000          6A43210D
00000004          51C9A847
00000008          169B87F1
0000000C          C981A517
00000010          9A16D875
00000014          54C9815F  

mov [ebx], [eax]

This, finally, you would think would move the value from the memory address contained in eax to the memory address contained in ebx.

 | EAX : 00000010 |   --no-->   | EAX : 00000010 |
 | EBX : 00000008 | --change--> | EBX : 00000008 |

ADDRESS           VALUE
00000000          6A43210D   ->   6A43210D 
00000004          51C9A847   ->   51C9A847 
00000008          169B87F1 =====> 9A16D875   
0000000C          C981A517   ->   C981A517 
00000010         *9A16D875   ->   9A16D875 
00000014          54C9815F   ->   54C9815F 

But this combination is disallowed by the x86 architecture. You cannot move from memory to memory.

The use of brackets is therefore equivalent to a dereferencing operation.

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  • So in order for the second line to make sense, the VALUE of ebx must be an ADDRESS in memory?
    – ineedahero
    Feb 4, 2018 at 13:36
  • 1
    @ineedahero Because it is - I've updated the answer.
    – J...
    Feb 4, 2018 at 13:42
  • 1
    @DannyS 9.16.7 - Memory References, under section 9.16 (80386 Dependent Features).
    – J...
    Nov 27, 2019 at 13:24
  • 2
    @DannyS: Why isn't movl from memory to memory allowed? goes into detail about why that's not encodeable into machine code. The GAS manual doesn't bother specifying it because it's not a complete ISA manual; just for the syntax. The ISA rules are the same regardless of syntax. Jan 13, 2022 at 21:30
  • 1
    Note for beginners like me: Unlike MOV or other instructions, LEA is quite special, don't get confused and see this. Anyways this answer is great. Thanks! Aug 2, 2022 at 9:07
5

You were missing the operand delimiter , in the instructions. I don't know (yet) of any assembler without it. I fixed that in the quotes.

In x86 assembly some registers can be used as data registers or as address registers (a difference to other architectures). These registers are called GPRs ("General Purpose Registers"). They can contain 32-bit-values or 32-bit addresses. Their "names" are EAX,EBX,ECX,EDX,ESI,EDI,ESP,EBP.

mov ebx, eax

does move the value in EAX to EBX.

mov [ebx], eax

does move the value in EAX to the 32-bit DWORD value pointed to by the 32-bit address in EBX

mov ebx, [eax]

does move the 32-bit DWORD value pointed to by the 32-bit address in EAX to EBX

mov [ebx], [eax]

is an invalid instruction in 32-bit Intel assembly, because x86 machine code does not support two arbitrary memory operands in one instruction, only in special cases where at least one memory operand is implicit, like push dword [ebx] reading memory at [ebx] and writing memory at [esp - 4]. See What x86 instructions take two (or more) memory operands?

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  • What is the difference between "the value in EAX" and "the 32-bit DWORD value pointed to by the 32-bit address in EAX"? That is to say, what practical difference is there between the first two lines?
    – ineedahero
    Feb 4, 2018 at 13:29
  • How could the last line be invalid and not the second line?
    – ineedahero
    Feb 4, 2018 at 13:41
  • 1
    The last line contains two memory references, and the second line only one.
    – zx485
    Nov 26, 2021 at 13:16

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