1
class B {
  int x,y;
  int z;
  z=x*y;

  void show() {
    System.out.println(z);
  }
}

class A {
  public static void main(String as[]) {
    B b=new B();
    b.show();
  }
}

closed as not a real question by Sean Patrick Floyd, Vladimir Ivanov, Jon, Brian Agnew, George Stocker Feb 2 '11 at 14:49

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Could you format your code correctly and print the full error message (including line number)? – PaulJWilliams Feb 1 '11 at 10:01
  • 3
    do you have a question? – Jon Feb 1 '11 at 10:02
  • if you somehow make it correct (constructor or initializer block), you should heavily think of the logic behind it, because, you have x and y uninitialized. – Sarwar Erfan Feb 1 '11 at 10:07
  • @Sarwar, strictly speaking, x and y are initialized to the default value of zero. Thankfully, there is no such thing as uninitialized variables in Java. Of course, it still makes little sense to multiply two zeroes and store the result in another field. – Sergei Tachenov Feb 1 '11 at 10:36
  • @Sergey Tachenov: little sense or no sense? – Sarwar Erfan Feb 1 '11 at 10:44
14

You can't have statements in the class body (z=x*y;). You have (at least) two options:

  • int z = x * y;
  • use initializer block

    {
      z = x * y;
    }
    

These are virtually the same. I'd prefer the first option (cleaner) See here

  • Or a constructor, or even a field initializer (int z = x * y). – Sergei Tachenov Feb 1 '11 at 10:04
  • I showed the field initializer. The constructor is also an option, but not preferred if many constructors are likely to exist. – Bozho Feb 1 '11 at 10:05
  • +1 for initializer block. – Sarwar Erfan Feb 1 '11 at 10:06
  • well, these are virtually the same :) I'd prefer the first option – Bozho Feb 1 '11 at 10:07
  • 1
    I'd disagree and go with the constructor. The field initializer is practically equally as valid, but since the question here is almost definitely from a beginners perspective it's constructors he should be learning about for this sort of thing, or at least he should be learning about them before initialization blocks! – Michael Berry Feb 1 '11 at 10:08
3

z=x*y; you cant do it here. put it inside constructor

class B {
  int x,y;
  int z;
  //z=x*y; //you cant do it here. where are you getting x and y value by the way???

  public B()
  {
   //x and y values should be set 'somehow' before this
   z = x*y;
  }

  void show() {
    System.out.println(z);
  }
}
  • use Bozho's solution... initializer block... – Sarwar Erfan Feb 1 '11 at 10:05
0

I think that your problem is in these lines:

int z;
z=x*y;

This first line is perfectly fine - it declares a class instance variable called z of type int. This second line, however, is the source of your problem. In Java, it's illegal to have code in a class outside of a class method or static initializer. In this case, the statement z = x * y; is legal Java code, but it has to be inside of a method.

To fix this, you can move this code into a constructor or some other method.

0
  z=x*y;

mentioned not within method body. You can't do that. Move it to the constructor or another method.

Inside class body and outside method body you can mention only fields, methods and inner class declarations.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.