269

I would like to surround a number in a circle like in this image:

Number in Circle Image

Is this possible and how is it achieved?

19 Answers 19

470

Here's a demo on JSFiddle and a snippet:

.numberCircle {
    border-radius: 50%;
    width: 36px;
    height: 36px;
    padding: 8px;

    background: #fff;
    border: 2px solid #666;
    color: #666;
    text-align: center;

    font: 32px Arial, sans-serif;
}
<div class="numberCircle">30</div>

My answer is a good starting point, some of the other answers provide flexibility for different situations. If you care about IE8, look at the old version of my answer.

  • The current latest version of Internet Explorer, 9, actually supports border-radius. ...and div isn't a great choice for this. :) – reisio Apr 25 '12 at 3:15
  • To make it work in fiddle, you could go against a CDN, like jsdelivr, instead of using a relative path for the URL. If you update the URL in your fiddle with //cdn.jsdelivr.net/css3pie/2.0b1/PIE.htc it should work everywhere without additional retooling. – KyleMit Jan 6 '14 at 16:46
  • 1
    @KyleMit: That's a good idea, in theory. Unfortunately, CSS3 PIE has a same-domain limitation. – thirtydot Jan 6 '14 at 17:29
  • 4
    To avoid having to do math in the CSS whenever you change the font-size (a hassle if you are doing responsive design for example), you can use this adaption of thirtydot's jsfiddle that only uses pixels to describe the font-size: jsfiddle.net/dQR9T/7058 – Steven Sep 2 '16 at 16:04
  • 1
    @steven how to ensure the circle is always around the number , or can we make the circle bigger if the number is 24928 it overflows right now – transformer Jan 21 '17 at 18:56
119

The problem with most of the other answers here is you need to tweak the size of the outer container so that it is the perfect size based on the font size and number of characters to be displayed. If you are mixing 1 digit numbers and 4 digit numbers, it won't work. If the ratio between the font size and the circle size isn't perfect, you'll either end up with an oval or a small number vertically aligned at the top of a large circle. This should work fine for any amount of text and any size circle. Just set the width and line-height to the same value:

.numberCircle {
    width: 120px;
    line-height: 120px;
    border-radius: 50%;
    text-align: center;
    font-size: 32px;
    border: 2px solid #666;
}
<div class="numberCircle">1</div>
<div class="numberCircle">100</div>
<div class="numberCircle">10000</div>
<div class="numberCircle">1000000</div>

If you need to make the content longer or shorter, all you need to do is adjust the width of the container for a better fit.

See it on JSFiddle.

  • 2
    That's exactly the problem I was having, showing a percentage inside that could be '1', '10' or '100'. This works perfect, thanks! – Felipe Castro Mar 10 '14 at 21:23
  • Note this suggested edit was denied, but the changes actually center the text a bit better vertically, so I've added them to the answer manually. – Mike Sep 14 '15 at 3:44
  • This is the better answer. I would use translateY(-50%) instead of the negative top margin – Tobias Nov 11 '16 at 19:14
  • @Tobias Thank you for the great idea. I've updated my answer. – Mike Nov 11 '16 at 21:24
  • It would be much cleaner to remove the span and add the text-align and line-height to the div. Still the best answer probably. – dlsso Nov 22 '17 at 21:38
54

If it's 20 and lower, you can just use the unicode characters ① ② ... ⑳

http://www.alanwood.net/unicode/enclosed_alphanumerics.html

  • 11
    A nice idea but beware you are breaking semantics if the circle is for display purposes only – cubabit Aug 13 '14 at 7:28
45

For circle sizes varying based on the content this should work:

http://jsfiddle.net/nzsnw55s/

<span class="numberCircle"><span>30</span></span>
<span class="numberCircle"><span>1</span></span>
<span class="numberCircle"><span>5435</span></span>
<span class="numberCircle"><span>2</span></span>
<span class="numberCircle"><span>100</span></span>

.numberCircle {
  display:inline-block;
  line-height:0px;

  border-radius:50%;
  border:2px solid;

  font-size:32px;
}

.numberCircle span {
  display:inline-block;

  padding-top:50%;
  padding-bottom:50%;

  margin-left:8px;
  margin-right:8px;
}

It relies on the width of the content plus the margin-'s to determine the radius, then extends the height to match using the padding-'s. The margin-'s would need to be adjusted based on the font-size.

Update to remove inner element:

<span class="numberCircle">30</span>
<span class="numberCircle">1</span>
<span class="numberCircle">5435</span>
<span class="numberCircle">2</span>
<span class="numberCircle">100</span>

<style type="text/css">
.numberCircle {
    display:inline-block;

    border-radius:50%;
    border:2px solid;

    font-size:32px;
}

.numberCircle:before,
.numberCircle:after {
    content:'\200B';
    display:inline-block;
    line-height:0px;

    padding-top:50%;
    padding-bottom:50%;
}

.numberCircle:before {
    padding-left:8px;
}
.numberCircle:after {
    padding-right:8px;
}
</style>

Uses pseudo-elements to force the height. Need the zero width space for vertical alignment. Moved the line-height:0px from the outer to the pseudo so that it is at least visible when degrading for IE8.

  • 5
    For me, this was the best solution. It allows larger numbers, and is the most scalable. All the other solutions have way too much hard coding of sizes. This has the least. Font-size can be changed a fair amount without breaking this. If changed drastically, the margin needs to be adjusted, but it is very forgiving. Having to use a nested element is somewhat of a negative though. – Necreaux Feb 15 '16 at 19:48
  • @Necreaux Updated the answer with a version that replaces the explicit inner element with pseudo-elements. – ryachza Feb 16 '16 at 18:54
  • 1
    Best solution indeed. I just replaced the margin-left and margin-right size by 0.35em instead of 8px (padding in updated solution). So that you can change the number font-size and keep a suited margin. – Jibato Jan 12 '18 at 17:34
26

the easiest way is using bootstrap and badge class

 <span class="badge">1</span>
  • 4
    This is great! I'm already using bootstrap, I just didn't know this class existed. – Justin Jan 24 '17 at 5:59
  • 1
    Nice answer navid! – SeyedPooya Soofbaf Feb 8 '17 at 5:49
24

This version does not rely on hard-coded, fixed values but sizes relative to the font-size of the div.

http://jsfiddle.net/qod1vstv/

enter image description here

CSS:

.numberCircle {
    font: 32px Arial, sans-serif;

    width: 2em;
    height: 2em;
    box-sizing: initial;

    background: #fff;
    border: 0.1em solid #666;
    color: #666;
    text-align: center;
    border-radius: 50%;    

    line-height: 2em;
    box-sizing: content-box;   
}

HTML:

<div class="numberCircle">30</div>
<div class="numberCircle" style="font-size: 60px">1</div>
<div class="numberCircle" style="font-size: 12px">2</div>
  • 2
    hi this is very nice, but if the number is large, even in 100's or 1000's it scrolls out of the circle. Also, would it be possible to use the size of the font to create a new background color – transformer Jan 21 '17 at 19:04
  • 1
    Beautiful solution! – jomofrodo Aug 23 '19 at 19:04
8

You can use the border-radius for this:

<html>
  <head>
    <style type="text/css">

    .round
    {
        -moz-border-radius: 15px;
        border-radius: 15px;
        padding: 5px;
        border: 1px solid #000;
    }

  </style>
  </head>  
  <body>   
    <span class="round">30</span>
  </body>
</html>  

Play with the border radius and the padding values until you are satisfied with the result.

But this won't work in all browsers. I guess IE still does not support rounded corners.

  • dont forget ` -webkit-border-radius: 15px;` also there is a fix for IE htmlremix.com/css/curved-corner-border-radius-cross-browser but think twice about implementing it – Hannes Feb 1 '11 at 10:17
  • +1 probably the easiest method...fallback for IE looks ok as well (square). wordpress does it like this if i recall – Ross Feb 1 '11 at 10:17
4

My solution here - this easily allows for different sizes and colors and ties into a CMS for editorial control. For IE degrading to squares.

HTML:

<div class="circular-label label-outer label-size-large label-color-pink">
    <div class="label-inner"> 
        <span>Fashion & Beauty</span>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.circular-label {
    overflow: hidden;
    z-index: 100;
    vertical-align: middle;
    font-size: 11px;
    -webkit-box-shadow:0 3px 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
    -moz-box-shadow:0 3px 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
    box-shadow: 3px 3px 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
}
.label-inner {
    width: 85%;
    height: 85%;
    -moz-border-radius: 50%;
    -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
    border-radius: 50%;
    border: 2px dotted white;
    vertical-align: middle;
    margin: auto;
    top: 5%;
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
}
.label-inner > span {
    display: table;
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: middle;
    font-weight: bold;
    text-transform: uppercase;
    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    margin: auto;
    margin-top: 38%;
    font-family:'ProximaNovaLtSemibold';
    font-size: 13px;
    line-height: 1.0em;
}
.circular-label.label-size-large {
    width: 110px;
    height: 110px;
    -moz-border-radius: 55px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 55px;
    border-radius: 55px;
    margin-top:-55px;
}
.circular-label.label-size-med {
    width: 76px;
    height: 76px;
    -moz-border-radius: 38px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 38px;
    border-radius: 38px;
    margin-top:-38px;
}
.circular-label.label-size-med .label-inner > span {
    margin-top: 33%;
}
.circular-label.label-size-small {
    width: 66px;
    height: 66px;
    -moz-border-radius: 33px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 33px;
    border-radius: 33px;
    margin-top:-33px;
}

It's not too difficult to see how to do this. The bigger question is whether it is possible to make the dimensions of the circle scale to content.

Currently I don't think it is possible. Anyone?

4

Late to the party, but here is a bootstrap-only solution that has worked for me. I'm using Bootstrap 4:

<link href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/4.0.0/css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet"/>

<body>
<div class="row mt-4">
<div class="col-md-12">
<span class="bg-dark text-white rounded-circle px-3 py-1 mx-2 h3">1</span>
<span class="bg-dark text-white rounded-circle px-3 py-1 mx-2 h3">2</span>
<span class="bg-dark text-white rounded-circle px-3 py-1 mx-2 h3">3</span>
</div>
</div>
</body>

You basically add bg-dark text-white rounded-circle px-3 py-1 mx-2 h3 classes to your <span> (or whatever) element and you're done.

Note that you might need to adjust margin and padding classes if your content has more than one digits.

2

You work like with a standard block, that is a square

.circle {
    width: 10em; height: 10em; 
    -webkit-border-radius: 5em; -moz-border-radius: 5em;
  }

This is feature of CSS 3 and it is not very well suporrted, you can count on firefox and safari for sure.

<div class="circle"><span>1234</span></div>
2

HTML EXAMPLE

<h3><span class="numberCircle">1</span> Regiones del Interior</h3>

CODE

    .numberCircle { 

    border-radius:50%;
    width:40px;
    height:40px;
    display:block;
    float:left;
    border:2px solid #000000;
    color:#000000;
    text-align:center;
    margin-right:5px;

}
  • While this code is useful, it would be good to provide some explanation – mhatch Jun 16 '17 at 18:23
2

Late to the party but here's the solution I went with https://codepen.io/jnbruno/pen/vNpPpW

Css:

.btn-circle.btn-xl {
    width: 70px;
    height: 70px;
    padding: 10px 16px;
    border-radius: 35px;
    font-size: 24px;
    line-height: 1.33;
}

.btn-circle {
    width: 30px;
    height: 30px;
    padding: 6px 0px;
    border-radius: 15px;
    text-align: center;
    font-size: 12px;
    line-height: 1.42857;
}

html:

<div class="panel-body">
  <h4>Normal Circle Buttons</h4>
  <button type="button" class="btn btn-default btn-circle">
    <i class="fa fa-check"></i>
  </button>
  <button type="button" class="btn btn-primary btn-circle">
    <i class="fa fa-list"></i>
  </button>
</div>

Required no extra work. Thanks John Noel Bruno

  • 1
    Who is John Noel Bruno? If get it from a blog or tutorial, providing links would be a plus – Dush Sep 26 '19 at 13:39
1

Do something like this in your css

 div {
    width: 10em; height: 10em; 
    -webkit-border-radius: 5em; -moz-border-radius: 5em;
  }
  p {
    text-align: center; margin-top: 4.5em;
  }

Use the paragraph tag to write the text. Hope that helps

1

Something like what I've done here could work (for numbers 0 to 99):

CSS:

.circle {
    border: 0.1em solid grey;
    border-radius: 100%;
    height: 2em;
    width: 2em;
    text-align: center;
}

.circle p {
    margin-top: 0.10em;
    font-size: 1.5em;
    font-weight: bold;
    font-family: sans-serif;
    color: grey;
}

HTML:

<body>
    <div class="circle"><p>30</p></div>
</body>
1

Improving the first answer just get rid of the padding and add line-height and vertical-align:

.numberCircle {
   border-radius: 50%;       

   width: 36px;
   height: 36px;
   line-height: 36px;
   vertical-align:middle;

   background: #fff;
   border: 2px solid #666;
   color: #666;

   text-align: center;
   font: 32px Arial, sans-serif;
}
1

Heres my way of doing it, using square method. upside is it works with different values, but you need 2 spans.

.circle {
  display: inline-block;
  border: 1px solid black;
  border-radius: 50%;
  position: relative;
  padding: 5px;
}
.circle::after {
  content: '';
  display: block;
  padding-bottom: 100%;
  height: 0;
  opacity: 0;
}
.num {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}
.width_holder {
  display: block;
  height: 0;
  overflow: hidden;
}
<div class="circle">
  <span class="width_holder">1</span>
  <span class="num">1</span>
</div>
<div class="circle">
  <span class="width_holder">11</span>
  <span class="num">11</span>
</div>
<div class="circle">
  <span class="width_holder">11111</span>
  <span class="num">11111</span>
</div>
<div class="circle">
  <span class="width_holder">11111111</span>
  <span class="num">11111111</span>
</div>

1

enter image description here

Here's a demo on JSFiddle and a snippet:

/* Creating a number within a circle using CSS */
.numberCircle {
    font-family: "OpenSans-Semibold", Arial, "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, sans-serif;
    display: inline-block;
    color: #fff;
    text-align: center;
    line-height: 0px;
    border-radius: 50%;
    font-size: 12px;
    min-width: 38px;
    min-height: 38px;
}

.numberCircle span {
    display: inline-block;
    padding-top: 50%;
    padding-bottom: 50%;
    margin-left: 1px;
    margin-right: 1px;
}

/* Some Back Ground Colors */
.clrGreen {
    background: #51a529;
}
.clrRose {
    background: #e6568b;
}
.clrOrange {
    background: #ec8234;
}
.clrBlueciel {
    background: #21adfc;
}
.clrMauve {
    background: #7b5d99;
}
<span class="numberCircle clrGreen"><span>8</span></span>
<span class="numberCircle clrRose"><span>80</span></span>
<span class="numberCircle clrOrange"><span>800</span></span>
<span class="numberCircle clrMauve"><span>8000</span></span>

  • I like this solution better than the first one, because the circles stay at the same size, no matter what number is in them. – cslotty Oct 13 '20 at 14:53
0

The answer of thirtydot is right but is missing a little point. You need to add position: relative , if you want to have centered value in the circle and include also different range of number. For example 123;

HTML:

<div class="numberCircle">30</div>

CSS:

.numberCircle {    

border-radius: 50%;
behavior: url(PIE.htc); /* remove if you don't care about IE8 */
width: 36px;
height: 36px;
padding: 8px;
position: relative;
background: #fff;
border: 2px solid #666;
color: #666;
text-align: center;

font: 32px Arial, sans-serif;
}

but an easiest solution is to use Bootstrap

<span class="badge" style ="float:right">123</span>

0

I am surprised nobody used flex which is easier to understand, so I put my version of answer here:

  1. To create a circle, make sure width equals height
  2. To adapt to font-size of number in the circle, use em rather than px
  3. To center the number in the circle, use flex with justify-content: center; align-items: center;
  4. if the number grows (>1000 for example), increase the width and height at same time

Here is an example:

.circled-number {
  color: #666;
  border: 2px solid #666;
  border-radius: 50%;
  font-size: 1rem;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  width: 2em; 
  height: 2em;
}

.circled-number--big {
  color: #666;
  border: 2px solid #666;
  border-radius: 50%;
  font-size: 1rem;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  width: 4em; 
  height: 4em;
}
<div class="circled-number">
  30
</div>

<div class="circled-number--big">
  3000000
</div>

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