3

I have a decorator to register some class methods. How can I get both self and run parameters correctly?

class Task(object):
    _tasks = []

    @staticmethod
    def register(name):
        def decorator(fn):
            @wraps(fn)
            def wrapper(self=None, run=True, *args, **kwargs):
                if not run:
                    task = defaultdict()
                    task['name'] = name
                    task['fn'] = getattr(self, fn.__name__, None)
                    task['obj'] = self
                    task['args'] = deepcopy(args)
                    task['kwargs'] = deepcopy(kwargs)
                    Task._tasks.append(task)
                else:
                    return fn(self, *args, **kwargs)
            return wrapper
        return decorator

class Test(object):
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name

    @Task.register('foo')
    def foo(self, v1, v2):
        print 'running foo in object {} with arguments {} {}'.format(self.name, v1, v2)

    @Task.register('hello')
    def hello(self):
        print 'running hello in object {} '.format(self.name)

    def load(self):
        self.foo('1', '2', run=False)
        self.hello(run=False)

t1=Test('t1')
t1.load()

Traceback (most recent call last):

TypeError: wrapper() got multiple values for keyword argument 'run'
  • Your code doesn't have the error you described. (assuming from functools import *) – user202729 Feb 5 '18 at 6:27
3

your problem has nothing to do with the decorator. in a simpler form: what you are doing is this:

def foo(run=False, *args, **kwargs):
    print(run, args, kwargs)

foo(1, 2, run=True)  # TypeError: foo() got multiple values for argument 'run'

from your function signature, python will try to set run=1, args = (2,) and then run into the TypeError.

a fix - though not a very nice one - could be:

def foo(*args, **kwargs):
    run = kwargs.pop('run', False)  # run defaults to False; remove from kwargs
    print(run, args, kwargs)
| improve this answer | |
  • What I am doing is that I want to pass a "run" argument to the decorator which will tell the decorator to register the task or just execute it. But I don't want to add this "run" argument in my class methods as it's doing nothing in the methods. In this case, how should I pass/handle the "run" paramter? – Mr.Dreamer Feb 5 '18 at 6:47
  • you could just use what i called foo as your wrapper function. change its signature and get run from kwargs. that is actually what the other answer already suggests in detail... – hiro protagonist Feb 5 '18 at 6:50
  • Yes, this can be a solution. Thanks! – Mr.Dreamer Feb 5 '18 at 7:01
1

The run parameter is from the fun, so try to get it from function's parameter:

from collections import defaultdict
from copy import deepcopy
from functools import wraps

class Task(object):
    _tasks = []

    @staticmethod
    def register(name):
        def decorator(fn):
            @wraps(fn)
            def wrapper(self=None, *args, **kwargs):
                run = kwargs.pop('run', True)
                if not run:
                    task = defaultdict()
                    task['name'] = name
                    task['fn'] = getattr(self, fn.__name__, None)
                    task['obj'] = self
                    task['args'] = deepcopy(args)
                    task['kwargs'] = deepcopy(kwargs)
                    Task._tasks.append(task)
                else:
                    return fn(self, *args, **kwargs)

            return wrapper

        return decorator
| improve this answer | |
0

Python3 seems has better hanlder for the parameters, but don't know how to do this in python2:

from functools import wraps
def optional_debug(func):
    @wraps(func)
    def wrapper(*args, debug=False, **kwargs):
        if debug:
            print('Calling', func.__name__)
        return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrapper

@optional_debug
def spam(a,b,c):
    print(a,b,c)

spam(1,2,3)         # 1,2,3

spam(1,2,3, debug=True)    # Calling spam    # 1 2 3

| improve this answer | |

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