12

In Delphi 7 a the creation of an object was like this:

A := TTest.Create;
try
  ...
finally
  A.Free;
end;

However in a blog article Marco Cantù says that in Embercadero they use

A1 := nil;
A2 := nil;
try
  A1 := TTest.Create;
  A2 := TTest.Create;
  ...
finally
  A2.Free;
  A1.Free;
end;

Was something changed in the logic of try finally block during version upgrades? The second example seems like a typical error to me!

  • 9
    In the second example you create two objects, not one! Still, I prefer nested try..finally blocks in that case. – Andreas Rejbrand Feb 5 '18 at 12:20
  • 9
    I know it should not happen, but there can be a leak if destructor A2.Free; raises an exception. I'm for option 1, nested blocks. – Victoria Feb 5 '18 at 12:28
  • 1
    The funny thing is that Marco says they are going to use the code presented by the OP for their class library code. shrug – whosrdaddy Feb 5 '18 at 12:39
  • 1
    @David, if A2 destructor raises an exception, it will leak not only itself, but also A1 because its destructor won't get invoked. Nested block will fix at least that. And I'm not saying about fix. It's my preferable way of coding. Destructor should never raise an exception. That's the most important. – Victoria Feb 5 '18 at 15:30
  • 2
    @Victoria Now you have naff ugly code that still leaks. If you can't fix everything, it's better to have clean code than to fix half of the problem and have unreadable ugly code. And the issue is far bigger than simple leaking of heap memory. Resources, file handles, etc. won't be returned to the system. Leading to consequential failures, data corruption and lord knows what. The best thing to do if a destructor fails to run to completion is to forcibly terminate the process. – David Heffernan Feb 5 '18 at 15:38
25

Both are acceptable patterns. And this is not something that's changed.

First let's cover the one you're familiar with and why it's correct.

{ Note that here as a local variable, A may be non-nil, but
  still not refer to a valid object. }
A := TTest.Create;
try
  { Enter try/finally if and only if Create succeeds. }
finally
  { We are guaranteed that A was created. }
  A.Free;
end;

In the above: If A had been assigned after try, then there's a possibility that Create could fail and jump here. This would attempt to Free an object from an undefined location in memory. It can lead to an Access Violation or unstable behaviour. Note that the compiler would also give a warning that on A.Free; that A might be uninitialised. This is because of the possibility of jumping to the finally block before A is assigned due to an exception in the constructor.


So why is Marco's code acceptable?

A1 := nil; { Guarantees A1 initialised *before* try }
A2 := nil; { Guarantees A2 initialised *before* try }
try
  A1 := TTest.Create;
  A2 := TTest.Create;
  ...
finally
  { If either Create fails, A2 is guaranteed to be nil.
    And Free is safe from a nil reference. }
  A2.Free;
  { Similarly, if A1's Create fails, Free is still safe.
    And if A1's create succeeds, but A2's fails: A1 refers to a valid
    object and can be destroyed. }
  A1.Free;
end;

Note that Marco's code relies on some subtleties of the behaviour of Free(). See the following Q&A for more information:


The purpose behind the technique is to avoid nested try..finally blocks which can get messy. E.g.

A1 := TTest.Create;
try
  A2 := TTest.Create;
  try
    {...}
  finally
    A2.Free;
  end;
finally
  A1.Free;
end;

Marco's code reduces nesting levels, but requires 'pre-initialisation' of the local references.


Victoria has raised a caveat that if the destructor for A2 fails in Marco's code, then A1 will not be Freed. This would be a certain memory leak. However, I'd argue that as soon as any destructor fails:

  • it has not completed successfully;
  • so will probably already leak at least memory or resources;
  • and also, the overall integrity of your system falls into doubt. If 'simple cleanup' has failed: why, what went wrong, what future problems is this going to cause?

So the best advice I can offer is: take care to ensure the correctness of your destructors.

  • 7
    As Victoria pointed out, the only caveat is that your destructor may never throw an AV or else you will have a leak, maybe add that to your answer... – whosrdaddy Feb 5 '18 at 13:00
  • 3
    @whosrdaddy I agree it's a caveat; but if destructors are failing, you probably have more important things to worry about. It's a good reason to ensure destructors only concern themselves with the single task of destruction. – Disillusioned Feb 5 '18 at 13:14
  • 2
    The best practise is to assume that destructors never raise exceptions. Since you can't realistically handle that scenario, ensure it never happens, and code accordingly. – David Heffernan Feb 5 '18 at 15:03
  • 1
    Destructors themselves may not raise an exception, however it is possible for a destructor to cause an exception, which is why scenario 2 and 3 should always be used with caution – Dave Nottage Feb 5 '18 at 19:28
  • @DaveNottage I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "Destructors themselves may not raise an exception". Whether raise <exception>; is called inside destructor or in a method it calls is hardly relevant. It's still an exception within the context of the destructor. And in that regard: any exception, in any destructor (context), in any try..finally pattern means 1 or more destruction steps failed. Therefore some cleanup will have failed. Meaning some resource (memory, handle, lock etc.) is not released. No try..finally can guarantee perfect safety. – Disillusioned Feb 6 '18 at 13:40
15

There is one important addition to Craig's answer and explanation why using single try..finally block is also fine.

A1 := nil;
A2 := nil;
try
  A1 := TTest.Create;
  A2 := TTest.Create;
  ...
finally
  A2.Free;
  A1.Free;
end;

Potential problem with above code is that if A2 destructor raises or causes an exception A1 destructor will not be called.

From that standpoint above code is broken. But, the whole Delphi memory management is built on top of premise that destructors should never ever raise or cause an exception. Or in other words, if there is a code in destructor that can cause an exception, destructor must handle that exception on site and not allow it to escape.

What is the problem with destructors raising exceptions?

Raising exception in destructor will break calling destructor chain. Depending on the code, inherited destructors may not be called and they will not be able to perform proper cleanup resulting in memory or resources leak.

But even more important fact is that even if you have a single destructor that causes an unhandled exception, the FreeInstance method that releases object instance memory allocated on the heap will not be called and you will leak that object instance's memory.

That means following code will leak TTest instance heap memory if A.Free contains code that will cause an exception.

A := TTest.Create;
try
  ...
finally
  A.Free;
end;

The same is valid for nested try...finally blocks. If any of the destructors causes unhandled exception memory will be leaked.

While nested try...finally blocks will leak less memory than single try...finally blocks they will still cause the leak.

A1 := TTest.Create;
try
  A2 := TTest.Create;
  try
    ...
  finally
    A2.Free;
  end;
finally
  A1.Free;
end;

You can use as many try...finally blocks as you wish, or you can even use interfaces and automatic memory management, but an exception raising (causing) destructor will always leak some memory. Period.


How about BeforeDestruction?

The same rule that applies to destructors applies to BeforeDestruction method. Unhandled exception in BeforeDestruction will break object release process and destructor chain as well as FreeInstance will not be called resulting in memory leak.


Of course, proper handling of any exceptions inside BeforeDestruction method or destructors implies that you must make sure that all code that is responsible for any kind of cleanup, including calling inherited methods, that absolutely must be executed is executed during exception handling process.


We can certainly argue how much is some code broken, point is it is broken. All above examples will cause memory leak if any of the destructors causes an unhandled exception. And the only way such code can be properly fixed is by fixing broken destructors.


What exactly is handling exceptions?

Handling exceptions is done within try...except block. Any exception that is caught with that block and is not re-raised is handled. On the other hand try...finally blocks are used for cleanup (executing code that absolutely must run even in case of exception) and not for handling exceptions.

For instance if you have some code in BeforeDestruction or destructor doing string to integer conversion that code can raise EConvertError. You can catch that exception with try...except block and handle it there not letting it escape and cause havoc.

destructor TFoo.Destroy;
var
  x: integer;
begin
  try
    x := StrToInt('');
  except
    on E: EConvertError do writeln(E.ClassName + ' handled');
  end;
  inherited;
end;

If there is some cleanup code you must perform you can also use try...finally block inside and make sure that any cleanup code executes properly.

destructor TFoo.Destroy;
var
  x: integer;
begin
  try
    try
      x := StrToInt('');
    finally
      writeln('cleanup');
    end;
  except
    on E: EConvertError do writeln(E.ClassName + ' handled');
  end;
  inherited;
end;

Another way of handling exceptions - is preventing them in the first place. Perfect example is calling Free on your inner fields instead of calling Destroy. That way destructors can handle partially constructed instances and perform proper cleanup. If the FBar is nil FBar.Free will do nothing, but FBar.Destroy would raise an exception.

destructor TFoo.Destroy;
begin
  FBar.Free;
  inherited;
end;

How not to handle exceptions during destruction process

Don't go around writing try...except blocks in every destructor you have ever written. Not every single line of code can cause an exception, nor absolutely all exceptions everywhere should be eaten up.

Exceptions are exceptional events that may occur in some code under specific circumstances, but that does not mean you cannot recognize code that may cause an exceptions and protect it.

Also, wrapping up all code with try...except block will not keep you safe. You have to deal with exceptions within each destructor.

For instance if FBar destructor can cause an exception then you must handle that exception within TBar destructor. Wrapping it up in exception handler inside TFoo destructor will leak FBar instance because its destructor is flawed and it will not release FBar heap memory.

destructor TFoo.Destroy;
begin
  // WRONG AS THIS LEAKS FBar instance
  try
    FBar.Free;
  except
    ...
  end;
  inherited;
end;

This is proper handling of exception that may be raised in TBar destructor

destructor TBar.Destroy;
begin
  try
    // code that can raise an exception
  except
    ...
  end;
  inherited;
end;

destructor TFoo.Destroy;
begin
  FBar.Free;
  inherited;
end;
  • As per my comment in the other answer, it's possible for a destructor to cause an exception (as opposed to raising one). This scenario does not cater for that – Dave Nottage Feb 5 '18 at 19:30
  • @DaveNottage Causing or raising exception is basically the same as far as memory management is concerned. I will edit the answer to make that more clear. Under no circumstances should exception escape destructor. No matter what kind of code you write in such scenario you will always create a leak. – Dalija Prasnikar Feb 5 '18 at 19:47
  • 1
    I know it’s the same thing: my point is about what is or is not “safe”. This scenario is less safe than nested blocks – Dave Nottage Feb 5 '18 at 19:49
  • 2
    @DaveNottage If it is broken does it matter how much? – Dalija Prasnikar Feb 5 '18 at 20:14
  • @DaveNottage No, a destructor can raise an exception. – David Heffernan Feb 6 '18 at 13:53

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