I don't understand why this code block throws the error :

Cannot read property 'then' of undefined

bcrypt.genSalt(10,(err, salt) =>{
    if(err){
        console.log(err);
    }
    return bcrypt.hash(password,salt); 
}).then((hash)=>console.log(hash));

when this successfully logs the hash

bcrypt.genSalt(10,(err, salt) =>{
    if(err){
        console.log(err);
    }
    bcrypt.hash(password,salt).then((hash) => console.log(hash));
});

since bcrypt.hash returns - Promise<string> shouldn't both these code blocks supposed to work(log hash) ?

thanks !

  • 6
    Because obviously bcrypt.genSalt doesn't return Promise. Returnning from callback doesn't propagate outside of bcrypt.genSalt and makes it return a Promise. In order for your first snippet to work bcrypt.genSalt needs to return Promise in the first place. – dfsq Feb 5 at 18:36
  • 4
    bcrypt.getSalt doesn't return a Promise. You're returning one from its callback but its callback's return value isn't used anywhere. If you want to use it like that you need to promisify it. – Paulpro Feb 5 at 18:37
  • 1
    If i'm not wrong, apparently the second code isn't working, when hash returns a promise. I could be wrong though. – Phiter Feb 5 at 18:39
up vote 4 down vote accepted

From the docs:

Async methods that accept a callback, return a Promise when callback is not specified if Promise support is available.

So just omit the callback and use then instead:

bcrypt.genSalt(10).then(salt => {
    return bcrypt.hash(password,salt); 
}).then(hash => {
    console.log(hash);
}, err => {
    console.log(err);
});

The genSalt function does not return a promise (EDIT: It does when the callback is omitted). Instead it takes a callback, and whatever you return from that callback function is completely separate from the return of genSalt. That is to say, genSalt returns undefined no matter what your callback function returns.

So in order to get this to work, you can wrap the genSalt function into a promise like so:

function genSaltPromise(num) {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        bcrypt.genSalt(num, (err, salt) => {
            if (err) return reject(err);
            resolve(salt);
        })
    })
}

Then you could use it like so:

genSaltPromise(10).then(salt => {
    return bcrypt.hash(password, salt);
}).then(hash => {
    console.log(hash);
});

EDIT: As pointed out by @Bergi, the genSalt does return a promise when no callback is specified. So the above could be simplified to just:

bcrypt.genSalt(10).then(salt => {
    return bcrypt.hash(password, salt);
}).then(hash => {
    console.log(hash);
});
  • 2
    genSalt does return a promise, just like hash does - when you don't pass a callback – Bergi Feb 5 at 18:47

The first snippet fails because .then(..) is being called in the return value for genSalt(..); based on the error message, I would say that the method does not return anything.

The second snippet works because you are calling is on bcrypt, which is a promise.

The Promise is returned by the callback function, not bcrypt.genSalt. So, then will work if chained with the callback function, not bcrypt.genSalt. If you want to use then with bcrypt.genSalt, you need to wrap it in a promise. e.g :-

new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  bcrypt.genSalt(10,(err, salt) =>{
    if(err){
        console.log(err);
    }
     resolve(bcrypt.hash(password,salt)); 
  })
}).then((hash)=>console.log(hash));
  • genSalt does return a promise - when you don't pass a callback – Bergi Feb 5 at 18:47
  • yes ok. But i have posted my answer with respect to the provided code, where a callback is passed. – Akash Dathan Feb 5 at 18:50
  • Yes, it's just that the proposed solution "wrap it in new Promise" is suboptimal – Bergi Feb 5 at 18:52
  • 1
    Yeah true, I agree. The best solution to the problem is to omit the callback, I would also prefer that. But my answer focuses on pointing out the difference between the two functions in the question. My intention was clarification of concept rather than the optimal solution. – Akash Dathan Feb 5 at 18:56

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