5

I have two lists

List<String> names1;
List<String> names2;

I want a new list returned to me with values that exist in both lists. These values should not repeat as retainAll does.

This was my original approach:

return ListUtils.intersection(names1, names2);

And it works fine. But it is case-sensitive so AbC is not the same as abc. I need the comparison to be case insensitive. Is there another way to do this?

1
  • Are you ok with intersected list containing all string elements without the original case?
    – tsolakp
    Commented Feb 5, 2018 at 22:56

4 Answers 4

1

Just make a lowercase copy before using the intersection method:

return ListUtils.intersection(names1.stream().map(String::toLowerCase).collect(Collectors.toList()),
            names2.stream().map(String::toLowerCase).collect(Collectors.toList()));
3
  • This seems like the easiest approach so I don't really need to change much of what I already have. I forgot that I can just make everything lowercase. Commented Feb 5, 2018 at 22:49
  • works. but little bit performance impact
    – uma mahesh
    Commented Jul 16 at 10:29
  • @umamahesh I wrote this answer before I learned about data structures and algorithms. Yes, the runtime complexity is pretty bad. Commented Jul 16 at 11:51
1

Put the contents of one list into a Set<String>, lower-cased, say:

Set<String> lcNames2 =    
    names2.stream().map(String::toLowerCase).collect(Collectors.toSet());

Then:

List<String> intersection =
    names2.stream()
        .filter(n -> lcNames2.contains(n.toLowerCase())
        .collect(Collectors.toList());

But note that the notion of intersection is rather ill-defined when you are not dealing with equality as the equivalence relation.

Lists.intersection effectively treats the two lists as sets, since it will not add the same element twice.

But if you're not dealing with equals, what does it mean "not to add the same element twice"?

  • Do you mean that you only add one representative of every equivalence class (e.g. you won't add "Ab" if you already added "ab")? If so, how do you pick that representative? Unless you add a normalized form (e.g. the lower-cased string), your result depends upon order of appearance (which may or may not be what you desire).
  • Do you mean that you add all members of an equivalence class that you see, just not adding the exact same string twice (e.g. add both "Ab" and "ab", but not add "ab" again)?

Or something else.

The exact solution depends upon your actual requirements.

0

You could iterate through each list before-hand and convert each element to lower-case then run your intersection.

Something like:

List<String> names1;
List<String> names2;

for(int i=0; i < names1.size(); i++){
    names1[i] = names2[i].toLowerCase();
}

for(int i=0; i < names2.size(); i++){
    names2[i] = names2[i].toLowerCase();
}

return ListUtils.intersection(names1, names2);

You would have to look up exactly how to change values in a list, I can't remember if its the same as an array or some other method. You might also have to add or subtract 1 from the for loop conditional as I'm not sure if the .size() includes 0 or not.

-2

You can use retainAll:

names1.retainAll(names2);

I hope that help you! :)

0

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