33

I noticed scrollIntoView has some new options since last I looked.

Namely, block and inline. What's the difference between these two? I'm guessing {block: "start"} will align the top of the element with the top of the page, but I'm not sure how that would be different from inline, or how you would use both these options simultaneously?

87

The block option decides where the element will be vertically aligned inside the visible area of its scrollable ancestor:

  • Using {block: "start"}, the element is aligned at the top of its ancestor.
  • Using {block: "center"}, the element is aligned at the middle of its ancestor.
  • Using {block: "end"}, the element is aligned at the bottom of its ancestor.
  • Using {block: "nearest"}, the element:
    • is aligned at the top of its ancestor if you're currently below it.
    • is aligned at the bottom of its ancestor if you're currently above it.
    • stays put, if it's already in view.

The inline option decides where the element will be horizontally aligned inside the visible area of its scrollable ancestor:

  • Using {inline: "start"}, the element is aligned at the left of its ancestor.
  • Using {inline: "center"}, the element is aligned at the centre of its ancestor.
  • Using {inline: "end"}, the element is aligned at the right of its ancestor.
  • Using {inline: "nearest"}, the element:
    • is aligned at the left of its ancestor if you're currently on its right.
    • is aligned at the right of its ancestor if you're currently on its left.
    • stays put, if it's already in view.

Both block and inline can be used at the same time to scroll to a specified point in one motion.

Check out the following snippet to see how each works in action.

Snippet:

/* ----- JavaScript ----- */
var buttons = document.querySelectorAll(".btn");

[].forEach.call(buttons, function (button) {
  button.onclick = function () {
    var where = this.dataset.where.split("-");
    document.querySelector("div#a1").scrollIntoView({
      behavior: "smooth",
      block: where[0],
      inline: where[1]
    });
  };
});
/* ----- CSS ----- */
body {
  padding: 500px;
  width: 2000px;
}

header {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 100;
}

div#a1 {
  width: 1000px;
  height: 300px;
  background: url(//www.w3schools.com/css/trolltunga.jpg);
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
}
<!----- HTML ----->
<header>
  <button class="btn" data-where="start-start">T-L</button>
  <button class="btn" data-where="start-center">T-C</button>
  <button class="btn" data-where="start-end">T-R</button>
  <button class="btn" data-where="center-start">C-L</button>
  <button class="btn" data-where="center-center">C-C</button>
  <button class="btn" data-where="center-end">C-R</button>
  <button class="btn" data-where="end-start">B-L</button>
  <button class="btn" data-where="end-center">B-C</button>
  <button class="btn" data-where="end-end">B-R</button>
</header>

<div id = "a1"></div>

9
  • 2
    Thank you. Good explanation. However, "aligned inside the visible area of its scrollable ancestor" doesn't appear to be the whole truth -- Chrome is scrolling both the iframe and the parent page. Seems strange that it's even allowed to do that.
    – mpen
    Feb 6 '18 at 17:09
  • 1
    Yes, I noticed it while running the snippet. It's probably not supposed to occur, but it's clearly mentioned that it's an experimental technology, so they'll likely fix it soon. Feb 6 '18 at 18:18
  • 4
    Thank you for this, the block and inline properties are not clearly explained on the MDN site.
    – hsimah
    Apr 19 '18 at 1:31
  • 1
    @AngelPolitis "it's an experimental technology, so they'll likely fix it soon." - so said the guy a year and a half ago. :D Jul 9 '19 at 19:34
  • 2
    @AngelPolitis unfortunately, this fell in the "less than likely" category. :P Jul 11 '19 at 15:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.