1

I'm trying to write a mock logger. I want to write mock so? that I get the messages sented to the log.

var logger = Substitute.For <ILogger> ();

logger.AddMessage (ProtocolMessageTypes.Debug, "blah bar");
logger.AddMessage (ProtocolMessageTypes.Error, "Error");

It would be desirable to receive that like (note: the interface ILogger does not contain method GetMessage())

List <ILogMessages> messages = Logger.GetMessages ()
2
  • The question in its current state is incomplete and therefore unclear. Read How to Ask and then edit the question to provide a minimal reproducible example that can be used to reproduce the problem, allowing a better understanding of what is being asked.
    – Nkosi
    Commented Feb 6, 2018 at 11:28
  • this isn't something you should be testing. that logger is a third party application and there's no point testing it. Focus on testing your own code, not someone else's.If the logger is your own code then test that in isolation with some integration tests. A mock does not add value in that case either. Commented Feb 6, 2018 at 11:42

3 Answers 3

5

It depends on the Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Abstractions that you are using.

// This works for Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Abstractions version 2.2.0
[Test]
public void Test_NSubstitute_ILogger_2_2_0()
{
    // Given
    var logger = Substitute.For<ILogger>();

    // When
    logger.LogError("Error message");
    logger.LogInformation("Information message");


    // Then
    logger.Received(1)
        .Log(LogLevel.Error, 0, Arg.Is<object>(x=> x.ToString().Equals("Error message")), null, Arg.Any<Func<object, Exception, string>>());

    logger.Received(1)
        .Log(LogLevel.Information, 0, Arg.Is<object>(x => x.ToString().Equals("Information message")), null, Arg.Any<Func<object, Exception, string>>());
}
// This works for Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Abstractions version 3.0.1
[Test]
public void Test_NSubstitute_ILogger_3_0_1()
{
    // Given
    var logger = Substitute.For<ILogger>();

    // When
    logger.LogError("Error message");
    logger.LogInformation("Information message");

    // Then
    logger.Received(1)
        .LogError("Error message");

    logger.Received(1)
        .LogError("Information message");
}
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  • 3
    Have you found a way to use arguments matchers in logger.Received().LogError() with version 3.0.1 or later? I'd like to match a substring only, but have not found a way to do it. Your solution works nicely for the whole string.
    – Yuhis
    Commented Feb 1, 2020 at 18:58
0

NSubstitute is not the simplest solution for this.

Instead, write your own TempLogger (or TestLogger) class which implements ILogger and writes entries to List<T> or ConcurrentQueue<T>. Then implement GetMessages there, to playback the log entries it received.

4
  • This is an easy way I use it if I do not find another solution But then why do we need Nsubstitute, Rhino Mock and others ..?
    – Sergey
    Commented Feb 6, 2018 at 16:37
  • Mocking libraries are generally used to setup stubs ('if you call this method, return that') or expectations ('I really need to ensure you call this'). That is subtly different to what you are asking for here - you want to store state and (after the fact) examine that state. If you really want to use NSubstitute you could use something like nsubstitute.github.io/help/received-in-order and verify that all of the logger.AddMessage callls were received in the order you expected. I suspect the code will be more verbose and brittle than using my suggestion.
    – mjwills
    Commented Feb 6, 2018 at 20:17
  • Mocking libraries judging by the name exist for the creation of the mocks but they can and the stubs create.
    – Sergey
    Commented Feb 7, 2018 at 11:01
  • The main purpose of the Mocking Library, for the creation of the Mock. But they can also make stubs that are of course simpler and this is often used.
    – Sergey
    Commented Feb 8, 2018 at 1:49
0

It's really very simple.I slightly modified the example from NSubsittute help. It was necessary to use the indexer

  public interface IFoo
    {
        void SayHello(string to);
    }
    [Test]
    public void SayHello()
    {
        var cals = new List<string>();
        var foo = Substitute.For<IFoo>();
        foo.When(x => x.SayHello(Arg.Any<string>()))
            .Do(x =>
            {
                cals.Add(x[0].ToString());// use the indexer
            });
        foo.SayHello("World");
        Assert.AreEqual(cals[0], "World");
    }
1
  • What is the point of that style of test? You are verifying the state of cals - but cals was manipulated only by your test code (not the code under test). I would suggest using nsubstitute.github.io/help/received-in-order to verify that SayHello was called in the way you expect.
    – mjwills
    Commented Feb 7, 2018 at 9:25

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