18

There is a way to shift a dataframe column dependently on the condition on two other columns? something like:

df["cumulated_closed_value"] = df.groupby("user").['close_cumsum'].shiftWhile(df['close_time']>df['open_time])

I have figured out a way to do this but it's inefficient:

1)Load data and create the column to shift

df=pd.read_csv('data.csv')
df.sort_values(['user','close_time'],inplace=True)
df['close_cumsum']=df.groupby('user')['value'].cumsum()
df.sort_values(['user','open_time'],inplace=True)
print(df)

output:

   user  open_time close_time  value  close_cumsum
0     1 2017-01-01 2017-03-01      5            18
1     1 2017-01-02 2017-02-01      6             6
2     1 2017-02-03 2017-02-05      7            13
3     1 2017-02-07 2017-04-01      3            21
4     1 2017-09-07 2017-09-11      1            22
5     2 2018-01-01 2018-02-01     15            15
6     2 2018-03-01 2018-04-01      3            18

2) shift the column with a self-join and some filters

Self-join (this is memory inefficient) df2=pd.merge(df[['user','open_time']],df[['user','close_time','close_cumsum']], on='user')

filter for 'close_time' < 'open_time'. Then get the row with the max close_time

df2=df2[df2['close_time']<df2['open_time']]
idx = df2.groupby(['user','open_time'])['close_time'].transform(max) == df2['close_time']
df2=df2[idx]

3)merge with the original dataset:

df3=pd.merge(df[['user','open_time','close_time','value']],df2[['user','open_time','close_cumsum']],how='left')
print(df3)

output:

   user  open_time close_time  value  close_cumsum
0     1 2017-01-01 2017-03-01      5           NaN
1     1 2017-01-02 2017-02-01      6           NaN
2     1 2017-02-03 2017-02-05      7           6.0
3     1 2017-02-07 2017-04-01      3          13.0
4     1 2017-09-07 2017-09-11      1          21.0
5     2 2018-01-01 2018-02-01     15           NaN
6     2 2018-03-01 2018-04-01      3          15.0

There is a more pandas way to get the same result?

Edit: I have added one data line to make the case more clear. My goal is to get the sum of all transactions closed before the opening time of the new transaction

2
  • 1
    Is anything wrong with @Wen's answer? seems like the bounty was added after wen's answer but I don't see anything wrong with wen's answer. Can you elaborate if you want something more or different than that?
    – JohnE
    Feb 12, 2018 at 16:53
  • 1
    Ok , since you change the question , I am updating my answer
    – BENY
    Feb 15, 2018 at 2:55

3 Answers 3

9

I am using a new para here record the condition df2['close_time']<df2['open_time']

df['New']=((df.open_time-df.close_time.shift()).dt.days>0).shift(-1)
s=df.groupby('user').apply(lambda x : (x['value']*x['New']).cumsum().shift()).reset_index(level=0,drop=True)
s.loc[~(df.New.shift()==True)]=np.nan

df['Cumsum']=s




df

Out[1043]: 
   user  open_time close_time  value    New Cumsum
0     1 2017-01-01 2017-03-01      5  False    NaN
1     1 2017-01-02 2017-02-01      6   True    NaN
2     1 2017-02-03 2017-02-05      7   True      6
3     1 2017-02-07 2017-04-01      3  False     13
4     2 2017-01-01 2017-02-01     15   True    NaN
5     2 2017-03-01 2017-04-01      3    NaN     15

Update : since op update the question (Data from Gabriel A)

df['New']=df.user.map(df.groupby('user').close_time.apply(lambda x: np.array(x)))
df['New1']=df.user.map(df.groupby('user').value.apply(lambda x: np.array(x)))
df['New2']=[[x>m for m in y] for x,y in zip(df['open_time'],df['New'])  ]
df['Yourtarget']=list(map(sum,df['New2']*df['New1'].values))
df.drop(['New','New1','New2'],1)


Out[1376]: 
   user  open_time close_time  value  Yourtarget
0     1 2016-12-30 2016-12-31      1           0
1     1 2017-01-01 2017-03-01      5           1
2     1 2017-01-02 2017-02-01      6           1
3     1 2017-02-03 2017-02-05      7           7
4     1 2017-02-07 2017-04-01      3          14
5     1 2017-09-07 2017-09-11      1          22
6     2 2018-01-01 2018-02-01     15           0
7     2 2018-03-01 2018-04-01      3          15
9
  • 1
    Thank you Wen. I think that your solution is great but my case it's little more sophisticated. I have added some edits to make all clear Feb 6, 2018 at 16:47
  • 1
    @riccardonizzolo I believe , the back end logic should be same, just need to polish :-)
    – BENY
    Feb 6, 2018 at 17:05
  • 2
    this is amazingly concise ;-)
    – JohnE
    Feb 12, 2018 at 16:49
  • If you add the first date from my example, you'll see your method doesn't get the right answer. It works for a conditional shift, but not for the specific situation in the edit.
    – Gabriel A
    Feb 15, 2018 at 1:36
  • @GabrielA if you check the edit history of the question you will see he update the question my answer working for the first version
    – BENY
    Feb 15, 2018 at 2:04
8
+50

I made a modification to you test case that I think you should include. This solution does handle your edit.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df = pd.read_csv("cond_shift.csv")
df

input:

   user open_time   close_time  value
0   1   12/30/2016  12/31/2016  1
1   1   1/1/2017    3/1/2017    5
2   1   1/2/2017    2/1/2017    6
3   1   2/3/2017    2/5/2017    7
4   1   2/7/2017    4/1/2017    3
5   1   9/7/2017    9/11/2017   1
6   2   1/1/2018    2/1/2018    15
7   2   3/1/2018    4/1/2018    3

create columns to shift:

df["open_time"] = pd.to_datetime(df["open_time"])
df["close_time"] = pd.to_datetime(df["close_time"])
df.sort_values(['user','close_time'],inplace=True)
df['close_cumsum']=df.groupby('user')['value'].cumsum()
df.sort_values(['user','open_time'],inplace=True)
df


   user open_time   close_time  value   close_cumsum
0   1   2016-12-30  2016-12-31  1       1
1   1   2017-01-01  2017-03-01  5       19
2   1   2017-01-02  2017-02-01  6       7
3   1   2017-02-03  2017-02-05  7       14
4   1   2017-02-07  2017-04-01  3       22
5   1   2017-09-07  2017-09-11  1       23
6   2   2018-01-01  2018-02-01  15      15
7   2   2018-03-01  2018-04-01  3       18

Shift columns (explanation below):

df["cumulated_closed_value"] = df.groupby("user")["close_cumsum"].transform("shift")
condition = ~(df.groupby("user")['close_time'].transform("shift") < df["open_time"])
df.loc[ condition,"cumulated_closed_value" ] = None
df["cumulated_closed_value"] =df.groupby("user")["cumulated_closed_value"].fillna(method="ffill").fillna(0)
df


user    open_time   close_time  value   close_cumsum    cumulated_closed_value
0   1   2016-12-30  2016-12-31  1       1               0.0
1   1   2017-01-01  2017-03-01  5       19              1.0
2   1   2017-01-02  2017-02-01  6       7               1.0
3   1   2017-02-03  2017-02-05  7       14              7.0
4   1   2017-02-07  2017-04-01  3       22              14.0
5   1   2017-09-07  2017-09-11  1       23              22.0
6   2   2018-01-01  2018-02-01  15      15              0.0
7   2   2018-03-01  2018-04-01  3       18              15.0

All of this has been written is such a way that it's done across all users. I believe the logic is easier if you only focus on one user at a time.

  • Assume no events happens at the same time. This is the same thing as shifting the cumulative sum down one row.
  • Remove events that happens at the same time as other events.
  • Fill in the missing values. With a forwards fill.

I would still thoroughly test this before you use it. Time intervals are weird and there are a lot of edge cases.

6

(Note: @wen's answer seems fine to me, so I'm not sure if the OP is looking for something more or something different. In any event, here's an alternate approach using merge_asof that should also work well.)

First reshape the dataframes as follows:

lookup = ( df[['close_time','value','user']].set_index(['user','close_time'])
           .sort_index().groupby('user').cumsum().reset_index(0) )

df = df.set_index('open_time').sort_index()

The idea with "lookup" is simply to sort by "close_time" and then take a (grouped) cumulative sum:

            user  value
close_time             
2017-02-01     1      6
2017-02-05     1     13
2017-03-01     1     18
2017-04-01     1     21
2017-09-11     1     22
2018-02-01     2     15
2018-04-01     2     18

For "df" we just take a subset of the original dataframe:

            user close_time  value
open_time                         
2017-01-01     1 2017-03-01      5
2017-01-02     1 2017-02-01      6
2017-02-03     1 2017-02-05      7
2017-02-07     1 2017-04-01      3
2017-09-07     1 2017-09-11      1
2018-01-01     2 2018-02-01     15
2018-03-01     2 2018-04-01      3

From here, you just want to conceptually merge the two datasets on "user" and the "open_time"/"close_time" but the complicating factor is that we don't want to do an exact match on the time, but rather a sort of "nearest" match.

For these sorts merges you can use merge_asof which is a great tool for various non-exact matches (including 'nearest', 'backward', and 'forward'). Unfortunately due to the inclusion of groupby, it's necessary to also loop over the users, but it's still pretty simple code to read:

df_merged = pd.DataFrame()

for u in df['user'].unique():
    df_merged = df_merged.append( pd.merge_asof( df[df.user==u],  lookup[lookup.user==u], 
                                                 left_index=True, right_index=True, 
                                                 direction='backward' ) )

df_merged.drop('user_y',axis=1).rename({'value_y':'close_cumsum'},axis=1)

Results:

            user_x close_time  value_x  close_cumsum
open_time                                           
2017-01-01       1 2017-03-01        5           NaN
2017-01-02       1 2017-02-01        6           NaN
2017-02-03       1 2017-02-05        7           6.0
2017-02-07       1 2017-04-01        3          13.0
2017-09-07       1 2017-09-11        1          21.0
2018-01-01       2 2018-02-01       15           NaN
2018-03-01       2 2018-04-01        3          15.0

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