I wonder how SortedList capacity property works. In constructor I set capacity equals 2, but I can add more elements. Why?

SortedList<int, string> sortedList = new SortedList<int, string>{ Capacity = 2 };
sortedList.Add(0, "zero");
sortedList.Add(1, "one");
sortedList.Add(2, "two");
sortedList.Add(3, "three");

sortedList.Values.ToList().ForEach(v => Console.WriteLine(v));
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    Capacity != Limit. Typically capacity means number of elements to initially allocate memory to hold. – Ken White Feb 6 at 18:24
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    From MSDN: The capacity of a SortedList<TKey, TValue> is the number of elements the SortedList<TKey, TValue> can hold. As elements are added to a SortedList<TKey, TValue>, the capacity is automatically increased as required by reallocating the internal array. The purpose of it it is to limit the number of dynamic allocations needed when you know you will be storing many items – WelcomeOverflow Feb 6 at 18:26
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    Generally with a question like "I wonder how ____ works" the first thing to do is read the documentation. The second hit on a google search of your question title (which is only second after this question) is the documentation which answers your question in the second paragraph under "Remarks". I have to down-vote for no effort. – Rufus L Feb 6 at 18:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The description of initialCapacity parameter of SortedList's constructor says that this parameter specifies the initial capacity of the list, not its final capacity:

initialCapacity Type: System.Int32 The initial number of elements that the SortedList object can contain.

This parameter is used to reduce the number of re-allocations when you know the number of elements that you want to add to the list. This parameter does not change the fact that SortedList is a dynamically sized collection capable of expanding when you add elements to it.

Remarks to the Capacity property of the list provide further clarifications:

Capacity is the number of elements that the SortedList object can store. Count is the number of elements that are actually in the SortedList.

Capacity is always greater than or equal to Count. If Count exceeds Capacity while adding elements, the capacity is automatically increased by reallocating the internal array before copying the old elements and adding the new elements.

  • Indeed expanding an List can be quite expensive of done often. It require allocating another, bigger array. Transfering all the existing elements. Then letting the exising array run out of scope. Not to mention the GC having to clean up that old array sometime too. And we can not say how big/small each expansion will be. So this could happen a lot of times. For that reason if you have an idea how big the final list will likely be, give that number during construction. It can save you considerable memory and processign overhead. – Christopher Feb 6 at 18:29

Capacity is always greater than or equal to Count. If Count exceeds Capacity while adding elements, the capacity is automatically increased by reallocating the internal array before copying the old elements and adding the new elements.

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.collections.sortedlist.capacity(v=vs.110).aspx

The capacity of any List (sorted or not) starts at 0 by default or whatever capacity you set in the constructor. When you add a new item that surpasses that capacity, the underlying data store is reinitialized at double the previous capacity and the references are copied over.

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