10

I'm new to programming and Java. I've noticed that, in the Java API, there are methods with strange assignments inside if statements.

Here is an example from the Map interface:

default V replace(K key, V value) {
    V curValue;
    if (((curValue = get(key)) != null) || containsKey(key)) {
        curValue = put(key, value);
    }
    return curValue;
}

Is there some sort of benefit to nesting the assignment this way? Is this purely a style choice? Why not just do the assignment when curValue is first declared?

// why not do it like this?
default V replace(K key, V value) {
    V curValue = get(key); // not nested
    if (curValue != null || containsKey(key)) {
        curValue = put(key, value);
    }
    return curValue;
}

I've noticed this in a lot of the newly added Java 8 methods in the Map interface and elsewhere. This form of nesting the assignment seems unnecessary.

Edit: another example from the Map interface:

default V computeIfAbsent(K key,
        Function<? super K, ? extends V> mappingFunction) {
    Objects.requireNonNull(mappingFunction);
    V v;
    if ((v = get(key)) == null) {
        V newValue;
        if ((newValue = mappingFunction.apply(key)) != null) {
            put(key, newValue);
            return newValue;
        }
    }

    return v;
}
15
  • 5
    @JacobG. Usually it's good practice to initialize variables when they're needed rather than when they're declared. It's considered good practice to only declare variables where they're needed, so that's kind of a moot point.
    – shmosel
    Feb 7, 2018 at 0:27
  • 1
    I see that this pattern compiles into a dup+store, whereas initializing it first compiles into a store+load. Does anyone want to benchmark whether that JITs differently? Feb 7, 2018 at 0:39
  • 1
    curValue will not maintain the value returned by get(key). Instead, the value it really exists for is the returned result of put. It seems the dev wanted to emphasize this. It seems they're emphasizing the fact that get is only used for the null check, and that the value it may return is redundant.
    – Dioxin
    Feb 7, 2018 at 0:39
  • 3
    They're not 'unncessary', whether 'seemingly' or otherwise. They're just in a different place from what you're 'seemingly' expecting.
    – user207421
    Feb 7, 2018 at 0:40
  • 1
    No benefit, it’d be better to do that assignment right away. But sometimes people prefer showing off instead of writing clean and readable code.
    – algrid
    Feb 7, 2018 at 0:41

2 Answers 2

3

What this is doing is actually copying to a local variable, this is producing smaller byte code, and it is seen as an absolute extreme way of optimization, you will see this in numerous other places in the jdk code.

One other thing is that reading a local variable multiple times, implies reading a shared variable only once, if that for example would have been a volatile and you would read it only once and work with it within the method.

EDIT

The difference between the two approaches is a single read AS FAR AS I CAN TELL

Suppose we have these two methods:

V replace(K key, V value) {
    V curValue;
    if ((curValue = map.get(key)) != null || map.containsKey(key)) {
        curValue = map.put(key, value);
    }
    return curValue;
} 

V replaceSecond(K key, V value) {
    V curValue = map.get(key); // write
    if (curValue != null || map.containsKey(key)) { // read
        curValue = map.put(key, value); // write
    }
    return curValue;
}

The byte code for this is almost identical, except for: replaceSecond is going to have:

 astore_3 // V curValue = map.get(key); store to curValue
 aload_3  // curValue != null; read the value from curValue

While the replace method is going to be:

 dup      // duplicate whatever value came from map.get(key)
 astore_3 // store the value, thus "consuming" it form the stack

In my understanding, dup does not count as yet another read, so I guess this is what is referred as an extreme optimization?

15
  • Hi @Eugene! I was about to answer about locality, but you wrote this first. Maybe you want to expand with something about locality, why it's good (I believe its main benefit is that it produces more cache hits at the instruction level, but I might be wrong here, you'd need to confirm). I think that code inside methods that have good locality is more easily predictable, and by this I mean that compilers can predict what parts to optimize aggressively, but again, I'm not sure about anything of this. Just to give you some background that is arising from the depths of my memory...
    – fps
    Feb 7, 2018 at 13:22
  • Disregard my previous comment. Locality is maintained, both now and if get(key) was invoked when curValue is being declared.
    – fps
    Feb 7, 2018 at 13:27
  • What do you mean by "copying to a local variable"? What does the assignment outside of the if statement do instead?
    – Ivan
    Feb 8, 2018 at 3:35
  • @Ivan outside of the if statement? I don't get it, are you not showing the entire code may be? As far as copying to a local variable goes, you are operating only with a local variable curValue instead of a shared variable map.get(....); that's common pattern in multi-thread code btw, where you would read once and operate on the value that you have read, operation with it on the stack
    – Eugene
    Feb 8, 2018 at 8:11
  • @Ivan and here may be is a better way to express the same words (I might have a slow morning today)... stackoverflow.com/questions/37776179/…
    – Eugene
    Feb 8, 2018 at 8:20
2

There is a almost no difference in the generated bytecode (One instruction difference): https://www.diffchecker.com/okjPcBIb

I wrote this to generate the instructions and pretty print them:

package acid;

import jdk.internal.org.objectweb.asm.ClassReader;
import jdk.internal.org.objectweb.asm.tree.ClassNode;
import jdk.internal.org.objectweb.asm.tree.InsnList;
import jdk.internal.org.objectweb.asm.util.Printer;
import jdk.internal.org.objectweb.asm.util.Textifier;
import jdk.internal.org.objectweb.asm.util.TraceMethodVisitor;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.io.StringWriter;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class Acid {
    public interface Map<K,V> {
        default V replace(K key, V value) {
            V curValue;
            if (((curValue = get(key)) != null) || containsKey(key)) {
                curValue = put(key, value);
            }
            return curValue;
        }

        boolean containsKey(Object key);
        V get(Object key);
        V put(K key, V value);
    }


    public void print() {

        try {
            ClassNode node = loadRelativeClassNode(Map.class.getName());
            node.methods.stream().filter(m -> m.name.equals("replace")).forEach(m -> {

                System.out.println("\n\nMethod: " + m.name + "" + m.desc + "\n");
                System.out.println("-------------------------------\n");

                Printer printer = new Textifier();
                TraceMethodVisitor visitor = new TraceMethodVisitor(printer);
                Arrays.stream(m.instructions.toArray()).forEachOrdered(instruction -> {
                    instruction.accept(visitor);
                    StringWriter writer = new StringWriter();
                    printer.print(new PrintWriter(writer));
                    printer.getText().clear();
                    System.out.print(writer.toString());
                });
            });

        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    //Usage: `loadJVMClassNode("java.util.Map")`
    private static ClassNode loadJVMClassNode(String cls) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException {
        ClassLoader loader = ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();
        Class clz = loader.loadClass(cls);
        InputStream url = clz.getResourceAsStream(clz.getSimpleName() + ".class");
        ClassNode node = new ClassNode();
        ClassReader reader = new ClassReader(url);
        reader.accept(node, ClassReader.SKIP_DEBUG | ClassReader.SKIP_FRAMES);
        return node;
    }

    //Usage: `loadJVMClassNode(Acid.Map.class.getName())`
    private static ClassNode loadRelativeClassNode(String cls) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException {
        ClassLoader loader = ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();
        Class clz = loader.loadClass(cls);
        InputStream url = clz.getResourceAsStream(("./" + clz.getName() + ".class").replace(clz.getPackage().getName() + ".", ""));
        ClassNode node = new ClassNode();
        ClassReader reader = new ClassReader(url);
        reader.accept(node, ClassReader.SKIP_DEBUG | ClassReader.SKIP_FRAMES);
        return node;
    }
}

Usage: new Acid().print();

Output Difference is a single DUP instruction vs. ALOAD instruction..

For those that say.. well your interface isn't the Java JDK's interface.. I also did a diff: https://www.diffchecker.com/zBVTu7jK .

I'm very confident JIT will see the them as the exact same code regardless of whether you initialize the variable outside the if-statement or within it..

All code above was ran on:

java version "1.8.0_144"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_144-b01)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.144-b01, mixed mode)

OSX High-Sierra 10.13.3
IDE: Intelli-J

All in all, it's personal preference..

9
  • Performance isn't the only factor here. Why would someone prefer this style of nested assignments, which only appear in SOME areas? Some may believe it's for performance, which you're saying there seems to no apparent performance gain. These methods were comitted by the same developer, so the question still remains: what's the deal? It could be a design/readability concern we haven't noticed yet, or it could be some deep-down optimization that you haven't unearthed with your tests. May wanna analyze the JITed output to truly confirm your "personal preference" claim.
    – Dioxin
    Feb 10, 2018 at 17:19
  • (Continued) Not to mention, some devs are aware of future updates, writing their code in preparation for the next update. Some Java 8 features were pushed back, so this could be something which benefits in Java 9. If you care to fully debunk the relation to performance, please try Java 9 & upload JIT logs (or even just use JITWatch). I'd understand if you don't want to, would be excess work for potentially the same answer. I just don't feel analyzing only the bytecode for one version really does true justice for this mystery.
    – Dioxin
    Feb 10, 2018 at 17:25
  • @VinceEmigh; You think that assigning a variable outside vs. inside will cause a deep down optimization that isn't unearthed in the instructions but only in the JIT? It's an assignment. At the end of the function it returns the result. That's it. There's nothing more to it. There is even other languages that we do this in: stackoverflow.com/questions/151850/… It's a style that is inherent from C and C++. There is one case where it would be optimized out and that is short-hand evaluation..
    – Brandon
    Feb 10, 2018 at 18:13
  • For example: if (condition || ((err = someFunc()) == null)).. Then condition is true, someVar would be unassigned/null because of short-circuit evaluation: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation But that is the only optimization that could happen and requires conditions before the assignment. To not lose such a thing, many programmers adopted the style of putting assignments inside the if-statement. C99 recently allowed declarations inside if-statements as well. But that's about it.
    – Brandon
    Feb 10, 2018 at 18:18
  • 1
    You seem to like baroque code structure ;^). E.g. in loadRelativeClassNode, you can pass the cls parameter directly to the ClassReader, making the first three (nontrivial) statements obsolete. Also Arrays.stream(m.instructions.toArray()).forEachOrdered(instruction -> { can be replaced with m.instructions.iterator().forEachRemaining(instruction -> {. But actually, the entire thing you’re doing there can be simplified to Printer printer = new Textifier(); m.instructions.accept(new TraceMethodVisitor(printer)); printer.getText().forEach(System.out::print);
    – Holger
    Feb 14, 2018 at 13:32

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