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I have an issue with ternary operation:

let a = undefined ? "Defined!" : "Definitely Undefined",
    b = abc ? "Defined!" : "Definitely Undefined", // ReferenceError
    c = (abc !== undefined) ? "Defined!" : "Definitely Undefined", // ReferenceError
    d = (typeof abc !== "undefined") ? "Defined!" : "Definitely Undefined"

// results: a = d = "Definitely Undefined", 
// while b and c throw ReferenceError when abc is undefined

What is the best and short way to check if abc is undefined before accessing its properties as well as assign blank object {} if undefined?

let a = [[best way to check abc]] ? {[abc.label1]: 2, [abc.label2]: 1} : {}

PS: I am currently using (typeof abc !== "undefined") in place of [[best way to check abc]]

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  • 1
    why do you have an undeclared variable? or do you need just to check for undefined? Feb 7 '18 at 8:51
  • exactly, in my case I am expecting somebody to make that variable available for me :D Feb 7 '18 at 8:54
  • To be precise I am developing a generic code and lets say abc may or may not have been defined Feb 7 '18 at 8:56
  • @KiranShakya In that case, your code typeof abc !== "undefined" also fail right ? since abc is not defined ? Feb 7 '18 at 8:57
  • no! to clearify a bit, I use that part as condition for trinary operation as you can see in 4th line Feb 7 '18 at 8:57
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while b and c throw ReferenceError when abc is undefined

So abc isn't just undefined, it's undeclared. There's a big difference there.

If you need to handle abc being undeclared, the only safe way to do that (without try/catch) is with typeof:

typeof abc === "undefined"

That will be true, without error, if abc is an undeclared identifier. It will also be true if abc is declared and contains the value undefined.

What is the best and short way to check if abc is undefined before accessing its properties as well as assign blank object {} if undefined?

Probably using var to ensure it's declared:

var abc = abc || {};

Duplicate var declarations are not errors (duplicate let declarations are). So with the above, if abc is undeclared, it gets declared with the initial value undefined and we assign it {}. If it's declared, we replace its value with {} if it's falsy. But, if it may or may not be declared with let or const, then the above will throw an error as well.

So to handle the case where it may or may not be declared with let or const, we need a different variable entirely:

let ourabc = typeof abc === "undefined" || !abc ? {} : abc;

That sets ourabc to {} if abc is undeclared or if it contains a falsy value. Since all non-null object references are truthy, and you've said you want to access object properties, that's probably the shortest way.

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  • Thank you for mentioning my spelling mistake, so using typeof is only the best bet here? Feb 7 '18 at 9:07
  • @KiranShakya: (No worries, and "trinary" is a word, just not this word. :-) ) typeof is the only safe way to check if an identifier is undeclared without throwing an error. The ReferenceError is catchable, though, so technically you could use try/catch as well, but it's more verbose and less efficient if this (abc being undeclared) isn't an exceptional situation. Feb 7 '18 at 9:13
  • var abc = abc || {}; looks like it need a comment why this is right, if seen in code. Feb 7 '18 at 9:24
  • @NinaScholz: Yeah. I mean, it's a common idiom, and yet as you say, it looks...wrong. :-) I've generally commented it in projects where we used it for pseudo-namespaces (e.g., ones that don't use proper modules). Feb 7 '18 at 9:25
  • @T.J.Crowder, so if I always expect object to be its type, then I can do let a = typeof abc === "object" ? abc : {}. Technically it is shorter and correct :) Feb 7 '18 at 9:53
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   state = (typeof state !== "undefined") ? state : '';

This way you can check undefined variable in a ternary operator.

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What is the best and short way to check if abc is undefined before accessing its properties as well as assign blank object {} if undefined?

And you said that

I am currently using (typeof abc !== "undefined")

Looks like you have abc defined and the value is undefined.

You can try doing

var a = abc || {};
console.log(a);

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