2

I've seen the following snippet of PHP code, declaring some interfaces, abstract classes and concrete classes:

public interface MyInterface
{
    public function method1() : MyAbstractClass;
}

abstract class MyAbstractClass implements MyInterface
{
    protected $myVar = 1;
}

public class MyClass1 extends MyAbstractClass
{
    function method1(): MyAbstractClass
    {
        return new MyClass1();
    }
}

public class MyClass2 extends MyAbstractClass
{
    function method1(): MyAbstractClass
    {
        return new MyClass2();
    }
}

Some commentators argued that there is a circular dependency, and therefore, method1 should return MyInterface instead of MyAbstractClass.

would that be the case?

4

I'd post this as a comment, but it's a long read.

I suppose neither is "wrong" per-se. But what seems "right" would be something like this:

public interface MyInterface
{
    public function method1() : self;
}

abstract class MyAbstractClass implements MyInterface
{
    protected $myVar = 1;
}

public class MyClass1 extends MyAbstractClass
{
    function method1(): self // yes, you can return self
    {
        return $this;
    }
}

public class MyClass2 extends MyAbstractClass
{
    function method1(): self
    {
        return $this;
    }
}

The reasoning for return self in the interface is that a class who implements that interface and always return $this will always return...well...itself.

If you were to return MyAbstractClass in the interface, that would make the interface itself redundant since it can only be implemented by that Abstract Class, which completely defeats the purpose of even having an interface.

method1 should return self or the class in which it currently resides. You can of course return the parent class since by inheritance the return type is correct.

You can also return the interface, which is also perfectly fine. In fact, to some degree it seems "more better" or "more correct", but ultimately, it boils down to return self.

My 2 cents. The latter statement regarding method1 is open for interpretation, but ultimately the first one, regarding the interface, should definitely not be. An interface should never have a return type of the class that implements it.


It sucks that PHP doesn't yet have static as a valid return type. That would solve the problem by definition.


See this question also

PHP 7 interfaces, return type hinting and self

The accepted answer makes a fair point.

  • Perhaps it is a bit misleading. I returned $this for illustrative purposes, but can be a new instance of the same class. I will change that now @Andrew – Nicolas Feb 7 '18 at 9:47
  • 1
    What I wrote stands, if you return a new instance of the same class, the self part still applies. – Andrei Feb 7 '18 at 9:49

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