25

I am trying to compare two .NET arrays. Here is an obvious implementation for comparing arrays of bytes:

bool AreEqual(byte[] a, byte[] b){
    if(a.Length != b.Length)
        return false;
    for(int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
        if(a[i] != b[i])
            return false;

    return true;
}

A more refined approach can be seen here (via Google).

  1. What is the simplest way (using less code but readable) to compare two .NET arrays?
  2. What is the most efficient way compare two .NET arrays?
1
  • 2
    you could also add an early out if they are reference equal. Feb 4, 2012 at 21:29

4 Answers 4

48

You could use SequenceEqual:

string[] a = { "1", "2", "3" };
string[] b = { "1", "2", "3" };

bool areEqual = a.SequenceEqual(b); // true


string[] c = { "1", "2", "5" };
areEqual = a.SequenceEqual(c);      // false
2
  • 3
    This page has some performance information and claims that SequenceEqual is about 10 times slower than custom implementation using a loop. I wonder why. Jun 12, 2012 at 15:42
  • 2
    The SequenceEqual method is not available by default, you have to use System.Linq. Nice to know in case you get confused (as I did).
    – Arne
    Dec 7, 2012 at 20:45
18

Kathy's approach seems a good one to me. I'd personally allow the comparer to be specified explicitly:

bool AreEqual<T>(T[] a, T[] b)
{
    return AreEqual(a, b, EqualityComparer<T>.Default);
}

bool AreEqual<T>(T[] a, T[] b, IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
{
    // Handle identity comparison, including comparing nulls
    if (a == b)
    {
        return true;
    }

    if (a == null || b == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    if(a.Length != b.Length)
    {
        return false;
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
    {
        if(!comparer.Equals(a[i], b[i]))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

SequenceEqual as mentioned by CMS is good, but due to its generality over IEnumerable<T> I don't think it can do the "early out" if the length aren't equal. (It's possible that it checks for both sequences implementing IList though, to check Count directly.) You could generalise a little more, to use IList<T>

bool AreEqual<T>(IList<T> a, IList<T> b, IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
{
    if(a.Count != b.Count)
    {
        return false;
    }
    for(int i = 0; i < a.Count; i++)
    {
        if(!comparer.Equals(a[i], b[i]))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

The straight array version will probably be the most efficient - adding generality and abstraction usually hits performance, although whether it's significant will depend on your app.

12
  • 4
    Shouldn't the above code snippets have if (!comparer.Equals(a[i], b[i]) return false ? Did I just detect an anomaly in my universe :)
    – Gishu
    Oct 5, 2010 at 12:38
  • also requires a closing parentheses after the second 'if' statement. Jun 21, 2011 at 12:32
  • @Jon Could you please explain what is the advantage of explicitly specifying the comparer?
    – Sandeep
    Jun 26, 2011 at 20:00
  • @Sandeep: Suppose you want to be able to compare two string arrays for equality, but using a case-insensitive comparison, so {"FOO", "BAR"} is equal to {"foo", "bar"}.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jun 26, 2011 at 20:30
  • Shouldn't the second code snippet also use !comparer.Equals(...)?
    – jv42
    Sep 20, 2012 at 14:19
9

With the advent of .NET 4 you can use the method Equals() being provided by .NET arrays' explicitly implemented interface IStructuralEquatable. Then the code might look like this (I rewrote CMS' example):

string[] a = { "1", "2", "3" };
string[] b = { "1", "2", "3" };
bool result = ((IStructuralEquatable)a).Equals(b, StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer);
// result evaluates to true.

(IStructuralEquatable is also implemented in Tuples (also new in .NET 4).)

2
  • 4
    or use StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer.Compare(a,b) Sep 21, 2013 at 9:23
  • 1
    Thank you Chris! Your solution has an important benefit over mine: it is null-aware.
    – Nico
    Sep 22, 2013 at 7:25
0

Maybe something like this?

static bool AreEqual<T>(T[] a, T[] b) 
{
    bool areEqual = false ;
    T[] result = a.Intersect(b.AsEnumerable()).ToArray();
    areEqual = (result.Length == a.Length) && (result.Length == b.Length);
    return areEqual;
}

I am not sure of the performance hit on this one though.

EDIT

revised version taking into account Jon suggestions:

    static bool AreEqual<T>(T[] a, T[] b) 
    {
        return a.SequenceEqual(b);
    }
5
  • If you can use LINQ and don't mind the performance hit over using arrays directly (and early out for differing lengths), SequenceEqual is the way forward.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jan 28, 2009 at 7:43
  • 1
    This solution fails when there are duplicates: { 1, 1, 1} = { 1, 1, 1} returns false. It also doesn't take ordering into account: { 1, 2} != {2, 1} returns true.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jan 28, 2009 at 7:49
  • "{ 1, 2} != {2, 1} returns true" should mean that ordering is taken into account, right? Jan 28, 2009 at 8:14
  • I'm saying that ordering should be taking into account, but isn't. The two arrays should be seen to be different, but the original version of AreEqual in this answer returns true. Sorry for the confusion.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jan 28, 2009 at 9:31
  • If you want to check if 2 sets have the same unique values then maybe use something like: return (new HashSet<T>(a)).SetEquals(b); (this ignores order and don't care if the same value exists more then once.
    – NiKiZe
    Jul 28, 2020 at 8:25

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