1

When I run this code, the VS compiler return error and says that t1.mem is uninitialized local variable.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
struct T1
{
  int mem;
};

struct T2
{
  int mem;
  T2() { } // "mem" is not in the initializer list
};


int main()
{

  T1 t1;            // class, calls implicit default ctor
  std::cout << t1.mem << std::endl;
  const T2 t2;      // const class, calls the user-provided default ctor
                  // t2.mem is default-initialized (to indeterminate value)
  std::cout << t2.mem << std::endl;

}

If I have not assigned the constructor for struct T1, the compiler would have to generate the default constructor? And struct T2's constructor is empty initialization list, why it has no error tips?

  • 2
    This is perfectly valid code (albeit the values of T1::mem and T2::mem are indeed indeterminate). What is the EXACT error message you are seeing? It is an actual ERROR that stops compilation, or is it just a WARNING and the code runs? – Remy Lebeau Feb 8 '18 at 3:12
  • @RemyLebeau Error C4700 uninitialized local variable 't1' used ,stop compilation – linsir Feb 8 '18 at 3:26
  • 5
    @linsir That is actually a warning, not an error. You may have "treat warnings as errors" or the equivalent turned on. – Steve Feb 8 '18 at 3:30
  • @Steve I use vs compiler, it really can not run , and I can post photo – linsir Feb 8 '18 at 3:33
  • 3
    Possible duplicate of Implicit constructor versus "empty" constructor – xskxzr Feb 8 '18 at 8:32
0

My understanding is that the compiler is trying to protect you from its own generated code, and assumes "you know best" when using your provided constructor. In addition, checking whether or not your constructor actually ends up initializing T2.mem anywhere, including in the body of the constructor, could be an arbitrarily complex task, so the compiler authors may have decided that was a task better left unattempted than poorly executed.

This seems to be supported by the warning you would get from MSVC if you declared t1 as a const T1:

'const' automatic data initialized with compiler generated default constructor produces unreliable results

Note the wording "compiler generated default constructor".

Btw, you'll see this same warning if you request the compiler-generated default constructor with T2() = default.

0

Well, compilers aren't perfect. Sometimes they warn for one thing, but they don't for another, similar thing. Many compilers also offer runtime instrumentation of the generated code, where they insert special instructions that detect errors like use of uninitialized variables and will abort the program when that happens. But again, the system is not perfect and it can miss things.

In any event, you don't actually need a constructor. You can inline-initialize the class members:

struct T1
{
    int mem = 0;
};

The inline initialization will be used by default, unless a constructor initializes the member to something else:

struct T1
{
    int mem = 0;

    T1() = default;

    T1(int m) : mem(m) { }
};
// ...
T1 first; // first.mem == 0
T1 second(1); // second.mem == 1
  • Sorry but the second code snippet doesn't compile. T1 has no default constructor so T1 first; is invalid. – TobiMcNamobi Feb 8 '18 at 11:58
  • I guess that your example should include something like T1() {}. – TobiMcNamobi Feb 8 '18 at 12:05

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