6

I read some codes:

class XXXX {
  init() {
    MyOBJ.on('EVENTNAME', this.myfunction.bind(this)); // Line3, MyOBJ extends EventEmitter
  }
}

Just curious how to use arrow function to replace Line3? Thanks

1
  • really @AlexanderNied - that won't call myfunction, ever Feb 8 '18 at 21:58
6

Function.prototype.bind creates a new function that, when called, has its this keyword set to the provided value, with a given sequence of arguments preceding any provided when the new function is called.

What this specific example - this.myFunction.bind(this) - achieves, is to be able to pass a reference to a function (that happens to also be referenced by this.myFunction) while making sure that any calls to that function are done in the context of this.

In ES2015+ we can do this:

class XXXX {
    init() {
        MyOBJ.on('EVENTNAME', (event) => this.myfunction(event));
    }
}

With ES2015 arrow functions this will inside the body be the declaration context of the arrow function. So in our case this.myFunction gets called in an arrow function whose context is the context of the call to init(), a.k.a. this within init.

The key difference is that now you actually create a call expression instead of just passing a reference to the function. This time the reference given to MyOBJ.on is the arrow function.

A strict ES5 equivalent to the snippet above would also use a function literal as callback given to MyOBJ.on:

class XXXX {
    init() {
        MyOBJ.on('EVENTNAME', function(event) {
            this.myfunction(event));
        }.bind(this));
    }
}
3
  • 1
    how do you remove that listener though?
    – PeterT
    Dec 27 '20 at 19:43
  • 1
    @PeterT You can do that, for instance, if you just have the arrow function as class property (as this.myFunction), and then call MyObj.on('EVENTNAME', this.myFunction). Jan 2 at 10:31
  • I discovered the result of .bind() creates a new function, so you need to assign that new function to a variable declared outside the listener to remove it. You need to do this because binding again creates another function: you need to store the original.
    – PeterT
    Jan 2 at 18:15
4

Replace this

this.myfunction.bind(this)

to this

() => {}

Your event binding would look as follow:

class XXXX {
  someMethod() {}
  init() {
    MyOBJ.on('EVENTNAME', () => {
        this.someMethod(); // The originating context it's actually your class XXXX
    });
  }
}

Resource

  • Javascript ES6 — Arrow Functions and Lexical this

    One of the most anticipated new features in the ES6 Javascript standard was the Arrow Function Expression. It promises a shorter syntax than it’s predecessor the Function Expression. In addition is how the new Arrow Function binds, or actually DOES NOT bind it’s own this. Arrow Functions lexically bind their context so this actually refers to the originating context.

0

Depending on how you add your function to your object, you can simply do:

MyOBJ.on('EVENTNAME', this.someMethod);

Using arrow functions like this will bind the methods to the instance of the class.

class XXXX {
  constructor() {
    this.init();
  };

  someMethod = () => {
    console.log('someMethod() called');
  };

  init = () => {
    MyOBJ.on('EVENTNAME', this.someMethod);
  };
}

const x = new XXXX();
const MyOBJ = new EventEmitter();
MyOBJ.emit('EVENTNAME'); // someMethod() called

Note: using mocks to test for this.someMethod being called will likely fail if you use this method because the EventEmitter actually replaces the context of this inside someMethod when it's called. https://github.com/sinonjs/sinon/issues/1536 describes this issue.

1
  • 3
    Using arrow functions like this will cause syntax error, because that's ES6 question, and this is not ES6. Feb 8 '18 at 22:11

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