33

List of dictionaries:

data = [{
         'a':{'l':'Apple',
                'b':'Milk',
                'd':'Meatball'},
         'b':{'favourite':'coke',
              'dislike':'juice'}
         },
         {
         'a':{'l':'Apple1',
                'b':'Milk1',
                'd':'Meatball2'},
         'b':{'favourite':'coke2',
              'dislike':'juice3'}
         }, ...
]

I need to join all nested dictionaries to reach at the expected output:

 [{'d': 'Meatball', 'b': 'Milk', 'l': 'Apple', 'dislike': 'juice', 'favourite': 'coke'},
  {'d': 'Meatball2', 'b': 'Milk1', 'l': 'Apple1', 'dislike': 'juice3', 'favourite': 'coke2'}]

I try nested list comprehension, but cannot join dict together:

L = [y for x in data for y in x.values()]
print (L)

[{'d': 'Meatball', 'b': 'Milk', 'l': 'Apple'}, 
 {'dislike': 'juice', 'favourite': 'coke'}, 
{'d': 'Meatball2', 'b': 'Milk1', 'l': 'Apple1'}, 
 {'dislike': 'juice3', 'favourite': 'coke2'}]

I am looking for the fastest solution.

1

4 Answers 4

25

You can do the following, using itertools.chain:

>>> from itertools import chain
# timeit: ~3.40
>>> [dict(chain(*map(dict.items, d.values()))) for d in data]
[{'l': 'Apple', 
  'b': 'Milk', 
  'd': 'Meatball', 
  'favourite': 'coke', 
  'dislike': 'juice'}, 
 {'l': 'Apple1', 
  'b': 'Milk1', 
  'dislike': 'juice3', 
  'favourite': 'coke2', 
  'd': 'Meatball2'}]

The usage of chain, map, * make this expression a shorthand for the following doubly nested comprehension which actually performs better on my system (Python 3.5.2) and isn't that much longer:

# timeit: ~2.04
[{k: v for x in d.values() for k, v in x.items()} for d in data]
# Or, not using items, but lookup by key
# timeit: ~1.67
[{k: x[k] for x in d.values() for k in x} for d in data]

Note:

RoadRunner's loop-and-update approach outperforms both these one-liners at timeit: ~1.37

4
  • 2
    I like your fair behaviour because add timing of another solution which is better, so no reaccepting ;) Thank you.
    – jezrael
    Feb 9, 2018 at 8:09
  • 2
    @jezrael Thx, nah, no need to hide that fact. It is interesting to compare these 3 stylistically so different approaches and to see that the straightforward loop beats the comprehension and particularly the kitchen sink of built-ins and itertools :) Feb 9, 2018 at 8:14
  • 2
    A more readable alternative to dict(chain(*map(... is [ChainMap(*d.values()) for d in data]. It's slower than the other methods, though. Feb 9, 2018 at 11:01
  • Why if I want to flatten the output of [{k: v for x in d.values() for k, v in x.items()} for d in data] which is a list of dictionary it give error TypeError: descriptor 'items' requires a 'dict' object but received a 'str'? This result is like the input data.
    – abdoulsn
    Dec 6, 2019 at 9:56
23

You can do this with 2 nested loops, and dict.update() to add inner dictionaries to a temporary dictionary and add it at the end:

L = []
for d in data:
    temp = {}
    for key in d:
        temp.update(d[key])

    L.append(temp)

# timeit ~1.4
print(L)

Which Outputs:

[{'l': 'Apple', 'b': 'Milk', 'd': 'Meatball', 'favourite': 'coke', 'dislike': 'juice'}, {'l': 'Apple1', 'b': 'Milk1', 'd': 'Meatball2', 'favourite': 'coke2', 'dislike': 'juice3'}]
0
7

You can use functools.reduce along with a simple list comprehension to flatten out the list the of dicts

>>> from functools import reduce 

>>> data = [{'b': {'dislike': 'juice', 'favourite': 'coke'}, 'a': {'l': 'Apple', 'b': 'Milk', 'd': 'Meatball'}}, {'b': {'dislike': 'juice3', 'favourite': 'coke2'}, 'a': {'l': 'Apple1', 'b': 'Milk1', 'd': 'Meatball2'}}]
>>> [reduce(lambda x,y: {**x,**y},d.values()) for d in data]
>>> [{'dislike': 'juice', 'l': 'Apple', 'd': 'Meatball', 'b': 'Milk', 'favourite': 'coke'}, {'dislike': 'juice3', 'l': 'Apple1', 'd': 'Meatball2', 'b': 'Milk1', 'favourite': 'coke2'}]

Time benchmark is as follows:

>>> import timeit
>>> setup = """
      from functools import reduce
      data = [{'b': {'dislike': 'juice', 'favourite': 'coke'}, 'a': {'l': 'Apple', 'b': 'Milk', 'd': 'Meatball'}}, {'b': {'dislike': 'juice3', 'favourite': 'coke2'}, 'a': {'l': 'Apple1', 'b': 'Milk1', 'd': 'Meatball2'}}]
  """
>>> min(timeit.Timer("[reduce(lambda x,y: {**x,**y},d.values()) for d in data]",setup=setup).repeat(3,1000000))
>>> 1.525032774952706

Time benchmark of other answers on my machine

>>> setup = """
        data = [{'b': {'dislike': 'juice', 'favourite': 'coke'}, 'a': {'l': 'Apple', 'b': 'Milk', 'd': 'Meatball'}}, {'b': {'dislike': 'juice3', 'favourite': 'coke2'}, 'a': {'l': 'Apple1', 'b': 'Milk1', 'd': 'Meatball2'}}]
    """
>>> min(timeit.Timer("[{k: v for x in d.values() for k, v in x.items()} for d in data]",setup=setup).repeat(3,1000000))
>>> 2.2488374650129117

>>> min(timeit.Timer("[{k: x[k] for x in d.values() for k in x} for d in data]",setup=setup).repeat(3,1000000))
>>> 1.8990078769857064

>>> code = """
      L = []
      for d in data:
          temp = {}
          for key in d:
              temp.update(d[key])

          L.append(temp)
    """

>>> min(timeit.Timer(code,setup=setup).repeat(3,1000000))
>>> 1.4258553800173104

>>> setup = """
      from itertools import chain
      data = [{'b': {'dislike': 'juice', 'favourite': 'coke'}, 'a': {'l': 'Apple', 'b': 'Milk', 'd': 'Meatball'}}, {'b': {'dislike': 'juice3', 'favourite': 'coke2'}, 'a': {'l': 'Apple1', 'b': 'Milk1', 'd': 'Meatball2'}}]
    """
>>> min(timeit.Timer("[dict(chain(*map(dict.items, d.values()))) for d in data]",setup=setup).repeat(3,1000000))
>>> 3.774383604992181
4

If you have nested dictionaries with only 'a' and 'b' keys, then I suggest the following solution I find fast and very easy to understand (for readability purpose):

L = [x['a'] for x in data]
b = [x['b'] for x in data]

for i in range(len(L)):
    L[i].update(b[i])

# timeit ~1.4

print(L)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.