1

I'm trying to write a multi-threading helper with context managers. The idea is to define a bunch of functions inside a block and the context manager 'magically' takes care of the scheduling and everything. A simplified, working version looks like this:

import contextlib

@contextlib.contextmanager
def multi_threaded(count):
    funcs = []
    yield funcs
    my_slice = int(count / len(funcs))
    for i, func in enumerate(funcs):
        start = my_slice * i
        func(start, start + my_slice)   


def spawn_many():
    dataset = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    with multi_threaded(len(dataset)) as mt:
        def foo(start_idx, end):
            print("foo" + str(dataset[start_idx : end]))
        def bar(start_idx, end):
            print("bar" + str(dataset[start_idx : end]))
        mt.append(foo)
        mt.append(bar)

spawn_many()

This example works, but I'd like to get rid of these lines:

        mt.append(foo)
        mt.append(bar)

So that the user only needs to define the functions without adding them to the collection. Why? Because it's less error prone and I won't have control of the code that gets written with this library.

The problem is that after the yield I'm out of the scope where the def foo happened so I have no knowledge of the locals() existing in that scope, which is basically what I need to know which functions got defined in there. Any ideas/tricks/words of encouragement?

Thanks for reading!

3 Answers 3

1

A decorator might be a bit nicer:

import contextlib

@contextlib.contextmanager
def multi_threaded(count):
    funcs = []
    yield funcs
    my_slice = int(count / len(funcs))
    for i, func in enumerate(funcs):
        start = my_slice * i
        func(start, start + my_slice)   

def add_to_flist(mt):
    def _add_to_flist(func):
        mt.append(func)
        return func
    return _add_to_flist

def spawn_many():
    dataset = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    with multi_threaded(len(dataset)) as mt:
        @add_to_flist(mt)
        def foo(start_idx, end):
            print("foo" + str(dataset[start_idx : end]))
        @add_to_flist(mt)
        def bar(start_idx, end):
            print("bar" + str(dataset[start_idx : end]))

spawn_many()
3
  • Yeah that definitely looks a lot better. I'll leave the question unanswered for a little bit longer because I'm still hoping for a solution that doesn't require potentially-miss-able lines of code from the user.
    – Marcelo
    Commented Feb 9, 2018 at 14:19
  • Did you find anything better? Commented Feb 17, 2018 at 9:51
  • You may find my answer a reasonable solution.
    – blhsing
    Commented Jan 5 at 6:03
0

I read that this is not possible, at least not without ugly hacks, but i think my solution is not that ugly in the end:

You pass the locals() dictionary into the contextmanager on creation, and contextmanager interrogates that dictionary after yielding, to collect any callables:

@contextlib.contextmanager
def multi_threaded(block_locals, count):
    yield

    funcs = [fn for fn in block_locals.values() if callable(fn)]

    my_slice = int(count / len(funcs))
    for i, func in enumerate(funcs):
        start = my_slice * i
        func(start, start + my_slice)   

def spawn_many():
    dataset = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    with multi_threaded(locals(), len(dataset)):
        def foo(start_idx, end):
            print("foo" + str(dataset[start_idx : end]))
        def bar(start_idx, end):
            print("bar" + str(dataset[start_idx : end]))

        # Re-sync locals-dict handed earlier to multi_threaded().
        locals()

spawn_many()

NOTE that the trick works because of the last call to locals() in the block. It seems that Python synchronizes locals()-dictionary <--> function-local variables ONLY WHEN the locals() is called. Without that last call, multi_threaded would have seen {'dataset': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]} as locals.

1
  • You may find my answer a reasonable solution.
    – blhsing
    Commented Jan 5 at 6:10
0

The locals() dictionary of the caller is available as the f_locals attribute of the caller's frame, which you can obtain by calling sys._getframe(1), so you can save a copy of f_locals of the caller's frame in the __enter__ method of a context manager, and then in the __exit__ method, the keys that are added to f_locals of the caller's frame compared to the saved copy would be the functions defined in the with block:

import sys

class multi_threaded:
    def __init__(self, count):
        self.count = count

    def __enter__(self):
        self.old_locals = sys._getframe(1).f_locals.copy()

    def __exit__(self, exc_type, exc_val, exc_tb):
        new_locals = sys._getframe(1).f_locals
        funcs = list(map(new_locals.get, new_locals.keys() - self.old_locals.keys()))
        my_slice = int(self.count / len(funcs))
        for i, func in enumerate(funcs):
            start = my_slice * i
            func(start, start + my_slice)

def spawn_many():
    dataset = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    with multi_threaded(len(dataset)):
        def foo(start_idx, end):
            print("foo" + str(dataset[start_idx : end]))
        def bar(start_idx, end):
            print("bar" + str(dataset[start_idx : end]))

spawn_many()

This outputs:

foo[1, 2]
bar[3, 4]

Demo: https://ideone.com/7CF5Hm

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