I want to suppress specific warnings from g++. I'm aware of the -Wno-XXX flag, but I'm looking for something more specific. I want some of the warnings in -Weffc++, but not all of them. Something like what you can do with lint - disable specific messages.

Is there a built in way in gcc to do this? Do I have to write a wrapper script?

  • 1
    See this answer if you want to disable the warnings for n lines of code. – Keith Morgan Oct 6 '16 at 10:31
  • In case you are wiliiing to add it to the source code file(s) you can do the following as described here (and probably in other answers as well): codeyarns.com/2014/03/11/… – Guy Avraham Jul 18 at 12:39
up vote 19 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, this feature isn't provided by g++. In VC++, you could use #pragma warning to disable some specific warnings. In gcc, the closest you can have is diagnostic pragmas, which let you enable/disable certain types of diagnostics for certain files or projects.

For some warnings, there is a command line switch to disable them. In order to know which switch to use, pass -fdiagnostics-show-option to gcc.

  • The command line option to get the name of the warning is useful. – Troy Daniels Dec 24 '14 at 1:22

You could just use grep -v on the output.

Depending on the warning you wish to disable, you can sometimes correct in code. E.g.:

int main()
{
  int i;
}

Generates: foo.cc:4: warning: unused variable 'i'

Whereas this does not:

#define MARKUSED(X)  ((void)(&(X)))

int main()
{
  int i;
  MARKUSED(i);
}
  • 1
    GCC also has the keyword extension wish will suppress warnings from the next statement. – Gilad Naor Jan 29 '09 at 8:13
  • 4
    @GiladNaor Surround a section of code, e.g. #pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wfloat-equal" and #pragma GCC diagnostic pop – Evgeni Sergeev Dec 25 '13 at 11:40

pipe standard error to a filter that removes things you don't want to see. For example, this is my make file:

main.o: main.cpp g++ -c -Wall main.cpp 2>&1 | grep -v Wunused-variable

  • It seems to be more complex as a warning may fit multiple lines (say, when it contains code snippets). – AndreyS Scherbakov Jan 27 at 0:52

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