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It occurred to me that in C++ it is possible to use the type std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>>. An object of this type is essentially a reference to an object of type T or a null value, i.e., pretty much a pointer. My questions:

  1. Is there any conceptual difference between std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>> and T*?

  2. Is there any practical difference? Are there situations where it might be advisable to choose std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>> over T*?

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    Yes, it makes sense. There is no optional<T&>, so optional< reference_wrapper<T> > is the closest we have. That conveys non-ownership, no uninitialised values, no accidental construct from nullptr, no accidental arithmetic, no ugliness with *, ->, and co. (albeit some other ugliness due to having to eschew auto when looping, use .get() if the context doesn't supply the wanted conversion, etc.). These are all concrete benefits to both semantics and safety. Just optional<T&> would be more concise, but then we'll be wondering why we could put that in a container but not T&.... Sep 30, 2018 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

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Is there any conceptual difference between std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>> and T*?

std::optional<>, as the name already suggest, is meant to be used when we could have a value or might not have any value at all.

The equivalent of having no value for a T* object would be assigning nullptr to it, i.e.: the pointer will point to nowhere, as opposed to somewhere (or even anywhere, i.e.: uninitialized). It can be said that std::optional<> exports the concept of nullptr for pointers to any arbitrary type. So, I would say they are conceptually very similar, being the std::option<> approach a kind of generalization.

Is there any practical difference? Are there situations where it might be advisable to choose std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>> over T*?

I can think of the size. std::optional<> contains an internal flag for indicating the presence/absence of a value, whereas for T* the nullptr is encoded directly as one of the values the pointer can store. So a std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>> object will be larger than a T*.

When it comes to safety, unlike T*, std::optional<> provides the member function value() which throws an exception if there is no value (it provides as well as the unsafe operator*() as T* does).

Also, using std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>> instead of T* , for example, as a function's return value may indicate in a more explicit way that there might be no value at all.

15

The main difference between std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>> and T* is that with T* you have to think about who owns the memory that is pointed to.

If a function returns T* you have to know if you are responsible for freeing the memory or someone else is. That's not something you have to be concerned with when it's a reference.

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    Unless you are interacting with some pure c library, heap memory is pretty much always owned by unique_ptr, or shared_ptr, some kind of pool or container like vector.
    – D. Dmitriy
    Feb 29, 2020 at 20:05
  • "heap memory is pretty much always owned by unique_ptr, or shared_ptr" <- This is rather a convention that you can trust or not at your own peril. As @TimK said, that with std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>> you don't own the memory is the semantics of the C++ language. Oct 11, 2022 at 12:07
0

There is some other difference. With T * you have two states. The pointer points to a valid object or to nullptr, which means empty.

With std::optionalstd::reference_wrapper<T> you have a third state : Uninitialized, where the pointer itself has no state yet.

Imagine like this :

void foo( std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<T>>& ref)
{
if (!ref)
{  // still not initialized
  initialize_reference(ref);
}

Now that you do have the reference set up, you can check if it has valid pointer or not.

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