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To start with,Here in cplusplus.com it says every stream object has a associated std::streambuf
And in c++ primer 5th it says:

  1. Each output stream manages a buffer, which it uses to hold the data that the programreads and writes. For example, when the following code is executed
    os << "please enter a value: ";
    the literal string might be printed immediately, or the operating system might store the data in a buffer to be printed later

  2. There are several conditions that cause the buffer to be flushed—that is, to be written—to the actual output device or file:The program completes normally,using a manipulator such as endl,etc.

In my understanding,the sentence "the operating system might store the data in a buffer(not in the buffer)" in the context above means that both the stream object and OS use their own buffer,that is,one in the process address space,another in the kernel space managed by the OS.

And here is my question,

  1. why does every process/object(like cout) manage its own buffer?Why not just arose a system call and give the data directly to the OS buffer?

  2. Furthermore,is the term 'flushed' acting on object buffer or the OS buffer?I guess the flushed action actually arouse a system call and tell the OS to immediately put the data in OS buffer onto the screen.

  • 1
    suppose you write cout << 1; ... cout << 'Hello'; .... basically lots of small cout throughout your application, do you want cout to keep calling a system call each time you write it? Or do you want it to wait for a while till some internal buffer gets filled and it calls system call just 1 time? – Abhinav Gauniyal Feb 11 '18 at 4:53
  • 1. What if you don't have an operating system? 2. Flushing empties the stream buffer into whatever happens to be underneath. – user4581301 Feb 11 '18 at 6:19
  • @user4581301 So does the primer got something wrong?Since the term flushing of stream has literally nothing to do with the flushing of OS buffer. c++ Primer said"There are several conditions that cause the buffer to be flushed,that is,to be written—to the actual output device or file".Is it not true? – bigxiao Feb 11 '18 at 7:15
  • The Primer is correct enough. Any abstractions beneath C++ are outside the scope of C++, so anything on the path to the destination media might as well be the media. There could be hardware, an OS, a virtual machine, or a hamster wheel between the program and the actual media, and (for the most part) your program should neither know nor care. – user4581301 Feb 11 '18 at 7:45
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  1. why does every process/object(like cout) manage its own buffer?Why not just arose a system call and give the data directly to the OS buffer?

As a bit of a pre-answer, you could always re-write the stream buffer to always flush to a system OS call for output (or input). In fact, your system may already do this -- it just depends on the implementation. This system just allows buffering at the level of the iostreams library, but doesn't necessarily require it as far as I remember.

For buffering, it is not always the most efficient to send out or read data byte by byte. In cases like cout and cin in many systems this may be better handled by the OS, but you could adapt the iostreams to handle input and output streams that are reading sockets (I/O from internet connections). In sockets, you could write each individual character within a single package to your target over the internet, but this could become really slow depending on the type of link and how busy the link is. When you read a socket, the message can be split across packets so you need to buffer the input until you hit 'critical mass'. There are potentially ways to do this buffering at the level of OS, but I found at least I could get much better performance if I handled most of this buffering myself (since usually the size of messages had a large standard deviation across the runtime). So the buffering within iostreams was a useful way to manage the input and output to optimize performance, and this especially helped when you tried to juggle I/O from multiple connections at the same time.

But you can't always assume the OS will do the right thing. I remember once we were using this FUSE module that allowed us to have a distributed file system across multiple computer nodes. It had a really weird problem when writing and reading single characters. Whereas reading or writing a long sequence of single characters would take at most seconds on a normal hard disk using an ext4 system, the same operation would take days on the FUSE system (ignoring for the moment why we did it this way in the first place). Through debugging, we found the hang was at the level of I/O, and reading and writing individual characters exacerbated this run-time problem. We had to re-write the code to buffer our reads and writes. The best we could figure out is that the OS on ext4 did its own buffering but this FUSE file system didn't do a similar buffering when reading and writing to the hard disk.

In any case, the OS may do its own buffering, but there are a number of cases where this buffering is non-existent or minimal. Buffering on the iostream end could help your performance.

  1. Furthermore,is the term 'flushed' acting on object buffer or the OS buffer?I guess the flushed action actually arouse a system call and tell the OS to immediately put the data in OS buffer onto the screen.

I believe most texts will talk about 'flushed' in terms of the standard I/O streams in C++. Your program probably doesn't have direct control over how the OS handles its I/O. But in general I think the I/O of the OS and your program will be in sync for most systems.

  • Thanks for your detailed answer.According to your reply to the sencond problem,the term flushed used to refer to the std:iostream.object.However,in the context that i quoted from c++ primer 5th,it seems that flushed refer to the OS buffer,since it said "buffer to be flushed—that is, to bewritten—to the actual output device or file".Does the c++ primer make something wrong?If the flushed semantic just refers to object buffer,then the data would still be stored in the OS buffer for a while. – bigxiao Feb 11 '18 at 7:07
  • I forget the exact language of the standard, but I remember that when a program terminates normally that the various buffers are flushed to the OS but it is up to the OS to decide what to do next. For standard output, most OSes I know will then write any remaining output to the terminal/standard output when a program exits. But I don't think this is a guarantee. For example, if you are writing to a file (e.g., std::ofstream) but don't close the file, you could lose any data still sitting in the OS buffer, but most OSes will write to the file. – Daniel Feb 11 '18 at 7:16
  • Anyway, that is mostly me saying that most OSes I know will do the rational thing. But any given program will not have control of what the OS will do, so you are at the mercy of the OS. I've certainly lost output at times in random situations (for example, I will randomly lose my output from jobs I submitted to an LSF cluster, and it is possible the node and LSF decided not to flush its output buffer when the program finished). – Daniel Feb 11 '18 at 7:18
  • Yeah,so the statement of c++ Primer would be better if it said "There are several conditions that cause the buffer to be flushed—that is, to be written— to the OS buffer " instead. – bigxiao Feb 11 '18 at 7:26
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    @bigxiao Forget about the OS. C++ does not acknowledge the existence of OSes. The language is designed to neither know nor care what the runtime sits atop. – user4581301 Feb 11 '18 at 7:51

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