4

I'm trying to create a function that takes two parameter packs of objects. There are two templated base classes and I'd like to pass instances of derived classes to this function. Consider this example.

template <int N>
struct First {};

template <int N>
struct Second {};

// there are a few of these
struct FirstImpl : First<5> {};
struct SecondImpl : Second<7> {};

template <int... firstInts, int... secondInts>
void function(float f, First<firstInts> &... first, Second<secondInts> &... second) {
  // ...
}

What I would like to do is call function like this

FirstImpl firstImpl;
OtherFirstImpl otherFirstImpl;
SecondImpl secondImpl;
OtherSecondImpl otherSecondImpl;
function(9.5f, firstImpl, otherFirstImpl, secondImpl, otherSecondImpl);

but this example won't compile. The compiler seems to be trying to pack everything into the second parameter pack and failing because FirstImpl can't be implicitly converted Second<N>.

How do I get around this?

  • 2
    Actually, the compiler is probably trying to stuff everything into the first parameter pack, and not the second one. Once a parameter pack gets encountered, it likes to consume everything else in sight; and the first one won't leave any crumbs for the second one. I don't immediately see any way to implement this calling convention, but if you're open to alternative calling parameters, you could probably make something work with two variadic tuples, instead of two variadic packs. – Sam Varshavchik Feb 12 '18 at 4:42
  • Oooh, I should have thought of that! Put that into an answer and I’ll accept it. – Kerndog73 Feb 12 '18 at 4:50
  • Do you need the indices in the function? You could add a static constexpr value = N; member to First and Second. – O'Neil Feb 12 '18 at 6:31
  • O’Neil yes, I need to expand the firstInts pack and first pack in the same expression – Kerndog73 Feb 12 '18 at 6:34
  • O’Neil do you have a solution in mind? – Kerndog73 Feb 12 '18 at 6:35
1

Let's first code a variable template which determines whether a type derives from First or not:

template <int N>
constexpr std::true_type is_first(First<N> const &) { return {}; }
template <int N>
constexpr std::false_type is_first(Second<N> const &) { return {}; }

template <class T>
constexpr bool is_first_v = decltype( is_first(std::declval<T>()) )::value;

And a struct Split which collects the indices of the First and Second types:

template <class, class, class, std::size_t I = 0> struct Split;

template <
    std::size_t... FirstInts,
    std::size_t... SecondInts,
    std::size_t N
>
struct Split<
    std::index_sequence<FirstInts...>,
    std::index_sequence<SecondInts...>,
    std::tuple<>,
    N
> {
    using firsts = std::index_sequence<FirstInts...>;
    using seconds = std::index_sequence<SecondInts...>;
};

template <
    std::size_t... FirstInts,
    std::size_t... SecondInts,
    std::size_t I, 
    typename T,
    typename... Tail
>
struct Split<
    std::index_sequence<FirstInts...>,
    std::index_sequence<SecondInts...>,
    std::tuple<T, Tail...>,
    I
> : std::conditional_t<
    is_first_v<T>,
    Split<std::index_sequence<FirstInts..., I>,
          std::index_sequence<SecondInts...>,
          std::tuple<Tail...>,
          I + 1
    >,
    Split<std::index_sequence<FirstInts...>,
          std::index_sequence<SecondInts..., I>,
          std::tuple<Tail...>,
          I + 1
    >
> {};

And like I told you in the comments, adding a member value to First and Second (or inheriting from std:integral_constant), this allows us to write the following:

template <std::size_t... FirstIdx, std::size_t... SecondIdx, typename Tuple>
void function_impl(float f, std::index_sequence<FirstIdx...>, std::index_sequence<SecondIdx...>, Tuple const & tup) {
    ((std::cout << "firstInts: ") << ... << std::get<FirstIdx>(tup).value) << '\n';
    ((std::cout << "secondInts: ") << ... << std::get<SecondIdx>(tup).value) << '\n';
    // your implementation
}

template <class... Args>
void function(float f, Args&&... args)  {
    using split = Split<std::index_sequence<>,std::index_sequence<>, std::tuple<std::decay_t<Args>...>>;
    function_impl(f, typename split::firsts{}, typename split::seconds{}, std::forward_as_tuple(args...));
}

Demo

2

It's pretty much next to impossible to define something with two variadic parameter packs. Once a variadic parameter pack gets encountered, it likes to consume all remaining parameters, leaving no crumbs for the second pack to feed on.

However, as I mentioned, in many cases you can use tuples, and with deduction guides in C++17, the calling convention is only slightly longer than otherwise.

Tested with gcc 7.3.1, in -std=c++17 mode:

#include <tuple>

template <int N>
struct First {};

template <int N>
struct Second {};


template <int... firstInts, int... secondInts>
void function(std::tuple<First<firstInts>...> a,
          std::tuple<Second<secondInts>...> b)
{
}

int main(int, char* [])
{
    function( std::tuple{ First<4>{}, First<3>{} },
          std::tuple{ Second<1>{}, Second<4>{} });
}

That's the basic idea. In your case, you have subclasses to deal with, so a more sophisticated approach would be necessary, probably with an initial declaration of two tuples being just a generic std::tuple< First...> and std::tuple<Second...>, with some additional template-fu. Probably need to have First and Second declare their own type in a class member declaration, and then have the aforementioned template-fu look for the class member, and figure out which superclass it's dealing with.

But the above is the basic idea of how to designate two sets of parameters, from a single variadic parameter list, and then work with it further...

  • std::tuple can’t be removed from the call site? – Kerndog73 Feb 12 '18 at 5:27
  • This almost works in my situation but I need to pass FirstImpl and take it as a First<N> &. My compiler says “could not match ‘First<firstInts> &’ against ‘FirstImpl’”. Should I just find some way of breaking this function call into two? I’d really like to avoid that because I would have to expose some implementation details to the caller but it looks like I don’t have a choice. – Kerndog73 Feb 12 '18 at 6:14
0

Why won't you simply pass the class itself as template parameter? Like this:

template <int N>
struct First {};

template <int N>
struct Second {};

// there are a few of these
struct FirstImpl : First<5> {};
struct SecondImpl : Second<7> {};

template <typename FirstSpec, typename SecondSpec>
void function(float f, FirstSpec & first, SecondSpec & second) {
  // ...
}
  • I need to pass multiple instances of multiple base classes. I also need the int parameters of the base classes – Kerndog73 Feb 12 '18 at 4:31
0

Not exactly what you asked but... you could unify the two list using a variadic template-template int container (Cnt, in the following example) and next detect, for every argument, if is a First or a Second (see the use of std::is_same_v)

The following is a full working example

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template <int>
struct First {};

template <int>
struct Second {};

// there are a few of these
struct FirstImpl : First<5> {};
struct SecondImpl : Second<7> {};

template <template <int> class ... Cnt, int... Ints>
void function (float f, Cnt<Ints> & ... args)
 {
    (std::cout << ... << std::is_same_v<Cnt<Ints>, First<Ints>>);
 }

int main()
 {
   FirstImpl firstImpl;
   FirstImpl otherFirstImpl;
   SecondImpl secondImpl;
   SecondImpl otherSecondImpl;
   function(9.5f, firstImpl, otherFirstImpl, secondImpl, otherSecondImpl);
 }

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