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I'm learning golang. I have a goroutine to print variable i and after it I write a deadloop. But when var i up to 491519(or some other value), there is no output on the terminal. It looks like the goroutine which print var i is no longer be scheduled, the CPU execute the deadloop all the way after output 491519. Who can tell me the reason?
thanks.

My code:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "runtime"
)

func main() {
        go func() {
                i := 1
                for {
                        fmt.Println(i)
                        i = i + 1
                }
        }()
        runtime.GOMAXPROCS(4)
        for {
        }
}

I'd like to add that:
When I add fmt.Println("ABC") in the last deadloop, the alternation of ABC or i output on the terminal forever.

my go version: go version go1.9.1 darwin/amd64

  • You have a busy loop. There's never a reason to have a busy loop in your code. – JimB Feb 12 '18 at 16:15
  • @JimB Thank you for answering me. I have set the maximum number of CPUs that can be executing simultaneously, the busy loop and the other goroutine should be execute simultaneously in theory. But the goroutine is not be scheduled after running for some time. – Mann King Feb 13 '18 at 3:00
  • goroutines need to be interruptable by the runtime. A busy loop with no preemption points can’t be preemted, and therefore can eventually block the process. This isn’t really an issue in practice, because an empty busy is a programming error, and there’s no reason to have one in your code. – JimB Feb 13 '18 at 3:18
2
0

Goroutines are scheduled by Go runtime, therefore there are some limitations in comparison to the processes scheduling done by an operating system. An operating system can preempt processes by using timed interrupts, Go runtime cannot preempt goroutines.

Go runtime schedules another goroutine when goroutine

  • makes channel operation (this includes select statement, even empty)
  • make system call
  • explicitly calls runtime.Gosched

Setting GOMAXPROCS does not help much. Take a look at following program. It will use all processors and will stay in tight busy loops.

func runForever() {
   for {
   }
}

func main() {
    for i := 0; i < runtime.GOMAXPROCS(-1); i++ {
        go runForever()
    }
    time.Sleep(time.Second)
}

There are few ways of fixing your program:

go func() {
    for i:= 1; true; i++ {
        fmt.Println(i)
    }
}()

for {
    runtime.Gosched()
}

Or

go func() {
    for i:= 1; true; i++ {
        fmt.Println(i)
    }
}()

select {
}

The work on improving the case of tight loops is ongoing.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Oh, a wonderful answer!!! Thank you very very much! I get it from your answer. ^_^ – Mann King Feb 13 '18 at 11:37
2
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The dead loop will use a ton of CPU and possibly cause scheduler issues. If you want to block a goroutine, it's much more efficient to read from a channel that's never written:

ch := make(chan struct{})
<-ch

Or better still, set up a channel to wait for a signal to close the application:

stop := make(chan os.Signal, 1)
signal.Notify(stop, os.Interrupt)
<-stop

Also there should be no need to set GOMAXPROCS.

| improve this answer | |
  • Or use an empty select {} statement to block indefinitely. – Peter Feb 12 '18 at 17:49
  • True, but waiting on a signal would still be preferable to an empty select. – Adrian Feb 12 '18 at 17:53
  • @Adrian Thank you for answering me. I also think it is a scheduler bug, but I'm nor sure. And thank you for your other suggestions, it helps me. – Mann King Feb 13 '18 at 3:06
  • @Peter Thank you for your another approach. – Mann King Feb 13 '18 at 3:08

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