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I have a System.Windows.Shapes.Polygon object, whose layout is determined completely by a series of points. I need to determine if this polygon is self-intersecting, i.e., if any of the sides of the polygon intersect any of the other sides at a point which is not a vertex.

Is there an easy/fast way to compute this?

31
  • Easy, slow, low memory footprint: compare each segment against all others and check for intersections. Complexity O(n2).

  • Slightly faster, medium memory footprint (modified version of above): store edges in spatial "buckets", then perform above algorithm on per-bucket basis. Complexity O(n2 / m) for m buckets (assuming uniform distribution).

  • Fast & high memory footprint: use a spatial hash function to split edges into buckets. Check for collisions. Complexity O(n).

  • Fast & low memory footprint: use a sweep-line algorithm, such as the one described here (or here). Complexity O(n log n)

The last is my favorite as it has good speed - memory balance, especially the Bentley-Ottmann algorithm. Implementation isn't too complicated either.

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  • 1
    I'm trying to get my head around the last algorithm as we speak; particularly, I'm having trouble tracking on the meaning/purpose of structure T. – GWLlosa Feb 2 '11 at 15:35
  • T is a structure, which contains the line segments that cross the sweep line L. The most efficient structure would be a binary search tree (see also the Bentley–Ottmann algorithm). – Daniel Gehriger Feb 2 '11 at 15:40
  • 1
    I added another link where the Bentley-Ottmann algorithm is described with illustrations. – Daniel Gehriger Feb 2 '11 at 15:43
  • So C(p) is all the line segments (found in T) where p is a point that is colinear with the line segment, then. – GWLlosa Feb 2 '11 at 15:44
  • 1
    Both of the sweep-line algorithm links are down :*( – Jaanus Varus Aug 6 '15 at 14:12
3

Check if any pair of non-contiguous line segments intersects.

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  • They should all intersect at the vertexes; the question then becomes what the fastest way to check for a non-vertex intersection among an arbitrary set of line segments is. – GWLlosa Feb 2 '11 at 15:18
  • Good point, edited it to check if non-contiguous segments intersect. I don't think there's a built-in method, you'll have to write a method. Start by getting the Polygon.Points – Justin Morgan Feb 2 '11 at 15:21
  • Don't you mean open line segments? I've never heard of non-contiguous line segments. – Björn Lindqvist Nov 14 '17 at 17:38
2

For the sake of completeness i add another algorithm to this discussion.

Assuming the reader knows about axis aligned bounding boxes(Google it if not) It can be very efficient to quickly find pairs of edges that have theirs AABB's clashing using the "Sweep and Prune Algorithm". (google it). Intersection routines are then called on these pairs.

The advantage here is that you may even intersect a non straight edge(circles and splines) and the approach is more general albeit almost similarly efficient.

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0

I am a new bee here and this question is old enough. However, here is my Java code for determining if any pair of sides of a polygon defined by an ordered set of points crossover. You can remove the print statements used for debugging. I have also not included the code for returning the first point of crossover found.

/**
 * Checks if any two sides of a polygon cross-over.
 * If so, returns that Point.
 * 
 * The polygon is determined by the ordered sequence
 * of Points P 
 * 
 * If not returns null
 * 
 * @param V vertices of the Polygon
 * 
 * @return
 */
public static Point verify(Point[] V)
{
    if (V == null)
    {
        return null;
    }

    int len = V.length;

    /*
     * No cross-over if len < 4
     */
    if (len < 4)
    {
        return null;
    }

    System.out.printf("\nChecking %d Sided Polygon\n\n", len);

    for (int i = 0; i < len-1; i++)
    {
        for (int j = i+2; j < len; j++)
        {
            /*
             * Eliminate combinations already checked
             * or not valid
             */

            if ((i == 0) && ( j == (len-1)))
            {
                continue;
            }

            System.out.printf("\nChecking if Side %3d cuts Side %3d: ", i, j);

            boolean cut = Line2D.linesIntersect(
                    V[i].X,
                    V[i].Y,
                    V[i+1].X,
                    V[i+1].Y,
                    V[j].X,
                    V[j].Y,
                    V[(j+1) % len].X,
                    V[(j+1) % len].Y);

            if (cut)
            {
                System.out.printf("\nSide %3d CUTS Side %3d. Returning\n", i, j);
                return ( ... some point or the point of intersection....)
            }
            else
            {
                System.out.printf("NO\n");
            }
        }
    }

    return null;
}
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  • I disagree with Peter Duniho. This code is useful because it is the algorithm that is important, not the programming language. Also, Java and C# are extremely similar, and anyone interested in this problem can easily port the code to their target language. – likebike May 6 at 21:42
  • @likebike maybe you can vote up so I get some points? I can also re-do this in C# if you think that is critical. – Para Parasolian May 10 at 14:35
  • @ParaParasolian, I did up-vote. You had -1; Now you have 0. I think you should have a lot more. – likebike May 12 at 6:07
  • I agree that in theory the language does not matter if you where focusing on an effective algorithm. But this is not an effective way to solve the problem. – lwallent Aug 20 at 12:39

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