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I'm trying to locate price values in a body of text. I've found a few example regex's, which almost solve the problem, but none are perfect yet. The problem I have is that the numbers in my text may or may not have decimals. With this regex \d{1,3}(?:[.,]\d{3})*(?:[.,]\d{2}) I can't locate correctly this price 1.300

My price values may are: From 0 to infinite with or without dot to separate the thousands (1000 or 1.000, 1.000.000 or 1000000, etc) With comma for decimals or without comma if the value is integer (10,20 or 10)

How do I adapt my regex for these cases? Thanks

Wi

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    \b\d{1,3}(?:\.?\d{3})*(?:,\d{2})?\b? Wow talk about downvotes... Give the guy a chance. He presented what he tried, told us what's not working, gave us samples of what he is trying to match. Sure the OP's English isn't on par, but it's understandable. Wow. – ctwheels Feb 13 '18 at 16:07
  • @ctwheels thanks for your nice regex! Works like I need. And thanks for your compression about downvotes. I'll try to ask better next time. – crossmax Feb 13 '18 at 16:25
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    You're very welcome. The SO community is very particular sometimes about how they want users' questions to be structured. I'd suggest looking at methods to make your question easier to read. Check out SO's Help Center - Asking for ways to improve your questions :) there are other topics under the help section as well, but that should be a good place to start! – ctwheels Feb 13 '18 at 16:28
3

See regex in use here

\b\d{1,3}(?:\.?\d{3})*(?:,\d{2})?\b
  • \b Assert position as a word boundary
  • \d{1,3} Match between one or three digits
  • (?:\.?\d{3})* Match the following any number of times
    • \.? Optionally match the thousands separator (a literal dot)
    • \d{3} Match any digit exactly 3 times
  • (?:,\d{2})? Optionally match the following
    • , Match this literally
    • \d{2} Match any digit exactly twice
  • \b Assert position as a word boundary
  • Pretty good. Thanks again. – crossmax Feb 13 '18 at 16:26

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