6

If you've ever used Windsor Installers then you know what I'm talking about. You can have different installers for different parts of the application (repositories, logic, etc.)

public class RepositoriesInstaller : IWindsorInstaller
{
   public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
   {
      container.Register(...);
   }
}

And then we could call the installer from the Windsor bootstrapper like so

var container = new WindsorContainer();
container.Install(new RepositoriesInstaller());

Does asp.net core have anything similar?

If not I would implement it like so

public interface IServiceConfiguration
{
    void Install(IServiceCollection services);
}

public class DomainServiceConfiguration : IServiceConfiguration
{
    public void Install(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddScoped(...);
    }
}

And then call this from the startup file

new DomainServiceConfiguration().Install(services);
  • 2
    I would create a separate extension methods instead of classes. for example, services.UseAutofac() or services.UseMvc() or so. It will be more natural for asp.net core – Igor Gnedysh Feb 13 '18 at 17:10
  • So this is a good idea, I just have one issue with this. In Windsor you could find all installers in a given assembly. Meaning you don't have to update the IOC container every time you create a new installer as it uses reflection to get the installers. When you use extension methods you can't do that and everytime I create a new method I will have to update the startup file. – Storm Muller Feb 13 '18 at 17:14
  • 1
    The Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection is intended to keep simple and extendable so it can work out of the box. It do not have support for assembly scanning, modules (other the extension method pattern), decorators or any advanced DI stuff. If you need these you should plug-in a third party container – Tseng Feb 13 '18 at 17:39
  • 1
    I've answered a similar question in a different thread. It might help. stackoverflow.com/questions/48750761/… – Milan Vidakovic Feb 13 '18 at 18:42
5

So as many people mentioned in the comments, the IOC container in asp.net core is simple and light weight. However it is extensible.

The convention would be to write an extension method in a different file and call in the ConfigureServices method (So core's DI has no such thing as a module installer interface). This answers the question I posted originally.

My argument was that you would not be able to register the methods by convention. I.e. create the extension method and not have to worry about adding it to the ConfigureServices class.

I was wrong, this can be done. Here's the code:

This class lives in any .cs file within your assembly

public static class MyInstaller
{
    public static void Install(this IServiceCollection services)
    {
        // register stuff here
    }
}

Add This Method to your Startup.cs file

void LoadInstaller(Type type, IServiceCollection services)
{
    var installMethods= type.GetMethods(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public).Where(mi => mi.Name == "Install");

    var installMethod = installMethods.First();

    installMethod.Invoke(null, new object[] { services });
}

Add this to your ConfigureServices method

var assemblies = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().
        Where(assembly => assembly.GetName().Name.Contains("MyAssemblyName"));

        foreach (var assembly in assemblies)
        {
            var types = assembly.GetTypes().Where(t => t.IsClass && t.IsPublic && t.Name.Contains("Installer")); // You can create your own convention here, make sure it won't conflict with other class names that are not meant to be installers

            foreach (var installerType in types)
            {
                LoadInstaller(installerType, services);
            }
        }

Now you can add installers by convention and you never have to manually call the extension method for each new installer. The code could be cleaned up by adding error handling and throwing useful exceptions. But the idea is sound.

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