I have plotted the conditional density distribution of my variables by using cdplot (R). My independent variable and my dependent variable are not independent. Independent variable is discrete (it takes only certain values between 0 and 3) and dependent variable is also discrete (11 levels from 0 to 1 in steps of 0.1).

enter image description here

Some data:

dat <- read.table( text="y           x
3.00     0.0
2.75     0.0
2.75     0.1
2.75     0.1
2.75     0.2
2.25     0.2
3        0.3
2        0.3
2.25     0.4
1.75     0.4
1.75     0.5
2        0.5
1.75     0.6
1.75     0.6
1.75     0.7
1        0.7
0.54     0.8
0        0.8
0.54     0.9
0        0.9
0        1.0
0        1.0", header=TRUE, colClasses="factor")

I wonder if my variables are appropriate to run this kind of analysis.

Also, I'd like to know how to report this results in an elegant way with academic and statistical sense.

  • How about a heat map? – thc Feb 13 at 18:20
  • This appears suitable for proportional odds logistic regression and there are packages that have support for this method where the outcomes are multinomial. That suggestion rests on the supposition derived from you plot that both variables are ordered, and that the outcome is bounded. Post some sample data and we might offer code. That the way this forum works. If you need statistical consulting then SO is not the right place and you should go to CrossValidated.com. Generally on plots the independent variable on the x-axis and you seem to have reversed that. – 42- Feb 13 at 18:40
  • Cheers @42. Yes, independent variable (x) is on the x-axis. I had posted this same question in SO unsuccessfully (no answers), so I decided to try here (am I able to post the same question in both forums?). I've been also running non linear regressions to try to fit an exponential model to my data (see other questions), but it seems not very straightforward. Here, I'd like to receive some feedback to interpret and report the results of the graph with academic sense. – pyring Feb 13 at 18:57
  • Did you mean CV.com? SO is NOT the right place to ask for suggestion on interpreting graph. As I wrote ... post some data and we can offer code. Perhaps your other unanswered question had the same serious deficiency of no data and no code? – 42- Feb 13 at 19:10
  • I meant stackexchange Cross Validated, sorry. Some data has been posted. – pyring Feb 13 at 19:26

This is a run using the rms-packages `lrm function which is typically used for binary outcomes but also handles ordered categorical variables:

library(rms) # also loads Hmisc
      # first get data in the form you described
dat[] <- lapply(dat, ordered)  # makes both columns ordered factor variables

?lrm   
#read help page ... Also look at the supporting book and citations on that page
lrm( y ~ x, data=dat)
# --- output------
Logistic Regression Model

 lrm(formula = y ~ x, data = dat)


 Frequencies of Responses

    0 0.54    1 1.75    2 2.25 2.75    3 3.00 
    4    2    1    5    2    2    4    1    1 

                        Model Likelihood        Discrimination       Rank Discrim.    
                           Ratio Test              Indexes              Indexes       
 Obs             22    LR chi2      51.66    R2             0.920    C       0.869    
 max |deriv| 0.0004    d.f.            10    g             20.742    Dxy     0.738    
                       Pr(> chi2) <0.0001    gr    1019053402.761    gamma   0.916    
                                             gp             0.500    tau-a   0.658    
                                             Brier          0.048                     

         Coef     S.E.     Wald Z Pr(>|Z|)
 y>=0.54  41.6140 108.3624  0.38  0.7010  
 y>=1     31.9345  88.0084  0.36  0.7167  
 y>=1.75  23.5277  74.2031  0.32  0.7512  
 y>=2      6.3002   2.2886  2.75  0.0059  
 y>=2.25   4.6790   2.0494  2.28  0.0224  
 y>=2.75   3.2223   1.8577  1.73  0.0828  
 y>=3      0.5919   1.4855  0.40  0.6903  
 y>=3.00  -0.4283   1.5004 -0.29  0.7753  
 x       -19.0710  19.8718 -0.96  0.3372  
 x=0.2     0.7630   3.1058  0.25  0.8059  
 x=0.3     3.0129   5.2589  0.57  0.5667  
 x=0.4     1.9526   6.9051  0.28  0.7773  
 x=0.5     2.9703   8.8464  0.34  0.7370  
 x=0.6    -3.4705  53.5272 -0.06  0.9483  
 x=0.7   -10.1780  75.2585 -0.14  0.8924  
 x=0.8   -26.3573 109.3298 -0.24  0.8095  
 x=0.9   -24.4502 109.6118 -0.22  0.8235  
 x=1     -35.5679 488.7155 -0.07  0.9420  

There is also the MASS::polr function, but I find Harrell's version more approachable. This could also be approached with rank regression. The quantreg package is pretty standard if that were the route you chose. Looking at your other question, I wondered if you had tried a logistic transform as a method of linearizing that relationship. Of course, the illustrated use of lrm with an ordered variable is a logistic transformation "under the hood".

  • Thanks @42- Indeed, I've tried to linearize the relationship between my variables by doing lm(log(y)~x), lm(sqrt(y)~x), and many others. But even doing that the distribution of residuals remains weird, thus I can not run a prototypical linear regression. I decided then to fit a logistic function to my data by running a non linear regression by using nls(y ~ SSlogis(x, Asym, xmid, scal), data = f) [stackoverflow.com/q/48670990/7288088]. But by doing this is very difficult to get an idea of effect sizes. Can you help to interpret the summary of your analysis? – pyring Feb 14 at 11:34

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