4

I am working on a small library which emulates multi-value return values in Streams. For this to work well, I would like to be able to use StreamTuple::new instead of StreamTuple::create or id -> new StreamTuple<>(id, id). I tried various modifications, but my generics-fu is not good enough to figure out how to change the source to allow this.

public class StreamTuple<L, R> {

    protected final L left;
    protected final R right;

    public StreamTuple(L left, R right) {
        this.left = left;
        this.right = right;
    }

    /**
     * Suitable for method::references.  Value is set to id.
     */

    public static <L> StreamTuple<L, L> create(L left) {
        return new StreamTuple<>(left, left);
    }
    ....

Calling code snippet:

    Map<String, String> m = Stream.of("1", "2", "3")
//          .map(StreamTuple::create)
            .map(id -> new StreamTuple<>(id, id))
            .collect(toMap(StreamTuple::left, StreamTuple::right));

Suggestions? Or can't it be done?


EDIT: I would like an additional constructor that only takes one argument and returns a StreamTuple where L and R is the same type. The current code does not reflect that because it was a while ago I couldn't make it work and I thought I replicated it. I can only find out how to provide one of L / R and that leaves the other one open. How to write a single argument constructor for this?

1

There's no way to do this with a constructor, because there's no way to specify that the argument is a subtype of both L and R (i.e. conjunction/intersection). The language has a construct for such a requirement, but an intersection between type variables is not allowed:

// not allowed (causes a compilation error)
//                 vvvvv
public <LR extends L & R> StreamTuple(LR val) {
    this.left = val;
    this.right = val;
}

That might work in a future version of Java, however.

You have to use a factory method or, I suppose, what tsolakp suggested. I think the factory makes more sense.

2

Have you considered extending StreamTuple in order to define single argument constructor?

 Map<String, String> m = Stream.of("1", "2", "3")
.map( UnaryStreamTuple<String>::new )
.collect( Collectors.toMap(UnaryStreamTuple::left, UnaryStreamTuple::right) );

public class UnaryStreamTuple<T> extends StreamTuple<T, T> {

    public UnaryStreamTuple(T left) {
        super(left, left);
    }

    public UnaryStreamTuple(T left, T right) {
        super(left, right);
    }        
}
  • I was thinking of generalizing it. I did not think of this. Interesting. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 13 '18 at 22:11
  • @ThorbjørnRavnAndersen I dont see many other ways of having the same argument assigned to both L and R (which are different types) so this to me seems the smartest way to impose L=R and assign the same value to both w/o risk of runtime errors. I was also suggesting a similar approach, w/o extending the class. – PaoloC Feb 13 '18 at 22:17
1

Stream's map method requires a Function that takes in exactly one parameter and returns something else.

However, what you are attempting to use is StreamTuple::new, and that takes in 2 parameters, e.g. a BiFunction, so that doesn't match.

I suppose you could use flatMap to have two copies of each stream element, then write a custom Collector to collect these items 2 at a time, but that sounds like a lot more work than referencing your create method, which already matches.

What will work best is what you've done -- a factory method that takes exactly one parameter and returns the desired StreamTuple.

  • I would like a constructor that only takes one argument and returns a StreamTuple where L and R is the same type. The current code does not reflect that (because it is too long ago I did this) – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 13 '18 at 22:07
1

It can't be done since you're passing id twice. StreamTuple::create is the way to go.

  • You are right. The code does not reflect that what I really wanted to have was a single argument constructor that can implement both L and R. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 13 '18 at 22:03
1

StramTuple::new will be translated differently based on the FunctionalInterface expected by the accepting method.

expecting Function (T -> R) ==> ::new translates to new StreamTuple(t)

expecting BiFunction (T,U -> R) ==> ::new translates to new StreamTuple(t,u)

expecting Supplier (() -> R) ==> ::new translates to new StreamTuple()

Since Stream#map is expecting a Function, this cannot translate to the 2-args constructor. So your create factory method seems a good way to go.

Having a 1-arg contructor (like the below) behaving like the create method is not possible since compiler will complain because R is not bound

public StreamTuple(L both) { //will fail compilation
    this.left = both;
    this.right = both;
}

BUT since you want a 1-arg constructor and its argument must be assignable to both R and L, then you have 2 options: 1) one extends the other (e.g. R is assignable to L)

public class StreamTuple<L, R extends L> {

    protected final L left;
    protected final R right;

    public StreamTuple(R both) {
        this.left = both;
        this.right = both;
    }
}

2) if R and L are not related, then you need Object with casts on getters:

public class StreamTuple<L, R> {

    protected final Object left, right;

    public StreamTuple(Object o) {
        this.left = this.right = o;
    }

    public <L> L getLeft() { return (L) left; }
    public <R> R getRight() { return (R) right; }
}
  • 1
    Unfortunately that constructor definition wont even compile. – tsolakp Feb 13 '18 at 22:27
  • 1
    Tried making such a constructor. Basically Java does not like it because R is not bound. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 13 '18 at 22:35
  • Thanks - updated answer (for the sake of truth). So this answer might still represent the best explanation, and @tsolakp's the best and most elegant solution (kudos).. to you Thor the hard choice :) – PaoloC Feb 13 '18 at 23:15
  • Thanks @PaoloC. But I personally think that static factory method is the best approach to take. – tsolakp Feb 13 '18 at 23:18
  • Me too, but that does not answer the question "How to write a single argument constructor for this" :) – PaoloC Feb 13 '18 at 23:25

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