1

I have to create the half of a pyramid in C, and it works, but I dont understand why in the second loop when I evaluate j < i still execute the code in the curly braces, if j = 0 and i = 0, they are equal, so i is no greater than j...so what's the difference between using < and <= in this case?

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    for(int i = 0; i <= 4; i++){
        for(int j = 0; j < i; j++){
            printf("#");
        }
       printf("\n");
    }
}
6
  • 2
    It won't. You are misreading something. Change the inner printf to printf("%d %d ", i, j);.
    – Art
    Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 6:34
  • 1
    I recommend you also print I and J. It will make more sense. Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 6:35
  • Yep, I have tested your code at the cpp.sh. It works, as expected. Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 6:36
  • 1
    Whatever evidence makes you believe that block is executing even when j == i, it belongs in your question, and how you drew your conclusion based on said-same. Adding instrumentation, as others have advised, will clarify far more about what is going on, rather than assuming you already know.
    – WhozCraig
    Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 6:38
  • 2
    Note that the outer loop runs 5 times (from 0 to 4) but creates a pyramid 4 units high. That might have been the source of confusion.
    – JJJ
    Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 6:38

4 Answers 4

1

To print out a 4-high pyramid without a leading blank line

int main()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j <= i; j++) {
            printf("#");
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}
0
i = 0
    j = 0, break out of loop
i = 1
    j = 0, print #
    j = 1, break out of loop
i = 2
    j = 0, print #
    j = 1, print #
    j = 2, break out of loop
i = 3
    j = 0, print #
    j = 1, print #
    j = 2, print #
    j = 3, break out of loop
i = 4
    j = 0, print #
    j = 1, print #
    j = 2, print #
    j = 3, print #
    j = 4, break out of loop
i = 5, break out of loop
4
  • then it works only because I'm printing a blank line in the beginning? Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 6:51
  • yeah, pretty much, if you want a 4 high pyramid without the blank line change the <= in the i loop to <' and the <` in the j loop to <= Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 6:55
  • You are right, Thanks Stephen Docy! Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 6:59
  • Or avoid printing the blank line with if (i) printf("\n"); (which should be putchar ('\n'); because you don't need to call printf for a single-character) Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 7:02
0

As others pointed out, it doesn't work (the way you are expecting it to). One way to see what is going on:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    for(int i = 0; i <= 4; i++){
        printf("%d>",i);
        for(int j = 0; j < i; j++){
            printf("#");
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}
2
  • it works, only with a blank line in the beginning Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 6:58
  • @ThisNameWasTaken, yes but the inner loop does not execute on the first iteration, because i=0 is not less than j=0 thus no # is printed.
    – visibleman
    Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 7:03
0

your code

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    for(int i = 0; i <= 4; i++){
        for(int j = 0; j < i; j++){
            printf("#");
        }
       printf("\n");
    }
}

is working as it should work. The first # is printed when i = 1 and j=0. So, you are somewhere misunderstanding the concept of for loop in c. In C language, first the initialization i.e first argument is called and then the second argument that is loop control is accessed and if condition is true then the loop is accessed.

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