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This is my first question in Stackoverflow. I am not new to R, although I sometimes struggle with things that might be considered basic.

I want to calculate the count median diameter (CMD) for each of my rows from a Particle Size Distribution dataset.

My data looks like this (several rows and 53 columns in total):

               date      CPC   n3.16   n3.55   n3.98   n4.47   n5.01   n5.62    n6.31    n7.08    n7.94
2015-01-01 00:00:00 5263.434  72.988 140.346 138.801 172.473 344.806 484.415  606.430  739.625  927.082
2015-01-01 01:00:00 4813.182 152.823  80.861 140.017 213.382 264.496 359.455  487.293  840.349 1069.846

Each variable starting with "n" indicates the number of particles for the corresponding size (variable n3.16 = number of particles of median size of 3.16nm). I will divide the values by 100 prior to the calculations, in order to avoid such high numbers that prevent from the computation.

To compute the CMD, I need to do the following calculation:

CMD = (D1^n1*D2^n2...Di^ni)^(1/N)

where Di is the diameter (to be extracted from the column name), ni is the number of particles for diameter Di, and N is the total sum of particles (sum of all the columns starting with "n").

To get the Di, I created a numeric list from the column names that start with n:

D <- as.numeric(gsub("n", "", names(data)[3:54]))

This is my attempt to create a new variable with the calculation of CMD, although it doesn't work.

data$cmd <- for i in 1:ncol(D) {
  prod(D[[i]]^data[,i+2])
}

I also tried to use apply, but I again, it didn't work

data$cmd <- for i in 1:ncol(size) {
apply(data,1, function(x) prod(size[[i]]^data[,i+2])
}

I have different datasets from different sites which have different number of columns, so I would like to make code "universal".

Thank you very much

  • Welcome to SO, in future adding data example with dput(data) is more suitable. – jay.sf Feb 14 '18 at 13:52
1

This should work (I had to mutilate your date variable because of read.table, but it is not involved in the calculations, so just ignore that):

> df
        date      CPC   n3.16   n3.55   n3.98   n4.47   n5.01   n5.62   n6.31   n7.08    n7.94
1 2015-01-01 5263.434  72.988 140.346 138.801 172.473 344.806 484.415 606.430 739.625  927.082
2 2015-01-01 4813.182 152.823  80.861 140.017 213.382 264.496 359.455 487.293 840.349 1069.846

N <- sum(df[3:11]) # did you mean the sum of all n.columns over all rows? if not, you'd need to edit this
> N
[1] 7235.488

D <- as.numeric(gsub("n", "", names(df)[3:11]))
> D
[1] 3.16 3.55 3.98 4.47 5.01 5.62 6.31 7.08 7.94

new <- t(apply(df[3:11], 1, function(x, y) (x^y), y = D))
> new
         n3.16    n3.55     n3.98       n4.47        n5.01        n5.62        n6.31        n7.08        n7.94
[1,]  772457.6 41933406 336296640  9957341349 5.167135e+12 1.232886e+15 3.625318e+17 2.054007e+20 3.621747e+23
[2,] 7980615.0  5922074 348176502 25783108893 1.368736e+12 2.305272e+14 9.119184e+16 5.071946e+20 1.129304e+24

df$CMD <- rowSums(new)^(1/N)

> df
        date      CPC   n3.16   n3.55   n3.98   n4.47   n5.01   n5.62   n6.31   n7.08    n7.94      CMD
1 2015-01-01 5263.434  72.988 140.346 138.801 172.473 344.806 484.415 606.430 739.625  927.082 1.007526
2 2015-01-01 4813.182 152.823  80.861 140.017 213.382 264.496 359.455 487.293 840.349 1069.846 1.007684
  • Thanks! It worked perfectly. Regarding N, it corresponds to the sum over rows. So I just used 'rowSums' and df$CMD <- rowSums(new)^(1/df$N). – ioar Feb 14 '18 at 16:04
  • 1
    Ah, just one more thing, in case somebody needs the exact same calculations. It's actually function(x,y) (x^y), x = D) (not y = D). – ioar Feb 14 '18 at 16:27

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