1

I apologize in advance if this is a basic question - I am extremely new to ElasticSearch and it's a lot to take in.

For now, I'm trying to implement a basic keyword search that searches all indexed columns and I get some weird results with a specific field, Year. I have a certain number of documents I know should come back from the results and if I do a search for "2014", all of them come back successfully. If I do a search for just "14", nothing comes back at all, and if I add a wildcard (e.g. *14), then I get a single result back, because it didn't use the Year in the search and instead pulled it from the Description field.

I'm 100% positive this is something I'm doing wrong with the query structure, so any tips? As an aside, if anyone can provide suggested places to learn more about Elastic with NEST, it'd be extremely helpful. Their documentation is lacking a bit, where you have to understand how to use Elastic already for most of it to make sense and since I don't, I'm left stumbling through.

Here is the structure of ElasticListing:

    public long Id { get; set; }

    public string Brand { get; set; }

    public string Manufacturer { get; set; }

    public string ActiveTags { get; set; }

    public string Description { get; set; }

    public int Year { get; set; }

    public string Location { get; set; }

The search structure I'm using with NEST is this, where keyword would be "2014" (no quotes):

var response = this.ElasticClient.Search<ElasticListing>(s => s
            .AllTypes()
            .Query(query => query
                .Bool(b => b
                    .Must(must => must
                        .QueryString(qs => qs.Query(keyword))
                    )
                )                   
            )
            .Size(pageSize)
            .Explain()              
        );
4

What you are looking to perform is a term query on the Year field in Elasticsearch

var response = client.Search<ElasticListing>(s => s
    .AllTypes()
    .Query(query => query
        .Term(f => f.Year, 2014)
    )
    .Size(pageSize)
    .Explain()
);

Take a look at the writing queries section of the documentation.

In order to perform a wildcard query on the Year field, it needs to be indexed as a keyword data type (keyword does not analyze the input at index time, which is probably what we want for a numerical value being indexed as a "string").

By default, NEST will serialize the Year field as a number within JSON and Elasticsearch will infer the mapping for this as a numeric data type. Even with NEST's automapping, NEST will infer an integer data type mapping for Year, to match the CLR type Int32 of the property. So, we need to override this inferred mapping to ensure Year is indexed as a keyword data type.

Here's a complete example

private static void Main()
{
    var defaultIndex = "listings"; 
    var settings = new ConnectionSettings(new Uri("http://localhost:9200"))
        .DefaultIndex(defaultIndex);

    var client = new ElasticClient(settings);

    // Make this example re-runnable. You likely want to remove this :)
    if (client.IndexExists(defaultIndex).Exists)
        client.DeleteIndex(defaultIndex);     

    client.CreateIndex(defaultIndex, c => c
        .Mappings(m => m
            .Map<ElasticListing>(mm => mm
                .AutoMap()
                .Properties(p => p
                    // override the default inferred mapping for Year
                    .Keyword(k => k
                        .Name(n => n.Year) 
                    )
                )
            )
        )
    );

    client.IndexMany(new [] {
        new ElasticListing { Id = 1, Year = 2012 },
        new ElasticListing { Id = 2, Year = 2013 },
        new ElasticListing { Id = 3, Year = 2014 },
        new ElasticListing { Id = 4, Year = 1014 },      
    });

    client.Refresh(defaultIndex);

    var pageSize = 10;

    // returns only document with Id = 3
    var response = client.Search<ElasticListing>(s => s
        .AllTypes()
        .Query(query => query
            .Term(f => f.Year, 2014)
        )
        .Size(pageSize)
        .Explain()
    );

    // returns documents with Ids = 3 and 4
    response = client.Search<ElasticListing>(s => s
        .AllTypes()
        .Query(query => query
            .Wildcard(f => f.Year, "*14", rewrite:(MultiTermQueryRewrite)null)
        )
        .Size(pageSize)
        .Explain()
    );
}

public class ElasticListing
{
    public long Id { get; set; }
    public string Brand { get; set; }
    public string Manufacturer { get; set; }
    public string ActiveTags { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public int Year { get; set; }
    public string Location { get; set; }
}
  • Amazing - thank you! It looks like searching will require wildcards, but otherwise that worked exactly as I needed it to. – RubyHaus Feb 15 '18 at 2:10
  • 1
    No worries @RubyHaus :) Just be careful about being overzealous with wildcard and regex queries; for some queries, consider them to be analogous to performing a table scan in a relational database. If wishing to perform these kinds of queries frequently on the Year field, consider creating it as a text datatype with suitable analysis for the kinds of queries you expect to perform. – Russ Cam Feb 15 '18 at 2:35

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